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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/15/2018 in all areas

  1. Hi guys, I'm new to the community. I'm enjoying my ultimaker 2+ since couple of year now. This machine is super great and I never stop experiencing to get the most of it. Not easy to follow up though with all the updates, new material and stuff. But love this. I' using mostly my ultimaker to build mold therefore I'm not that into the detail of the best finishing of my prints. I use mostly the most rapid execution possible. here an example of my recent creation. It's a fully functional coffee machine based on Nespresso Essenza mini. ( I Love coffee) I have created a concrete version of the aesthetical cover. The mold have been printed with PLA filament. I use mostly PLA, simple, no odor and stuff. There are plenty of question I do have and therefore I will be visiting and participating to the community. Sharing experiences to get the most of each is great. If you have any question, let me know cheers daniele | bollicine-studio
    4 points
  2. I MADE A BETTER AND INTERACTIVE GRAPHS HERE: http://gr5.org/mat/ Okay well this post will grow when I add temperature properties. I've been thinking about posting this for a few years. Here is a graph showing some mechanical properties of some common filaments. Please read explanation as this is a complicated subject. Click to zoom in on chart (click 3 times - first click zooms, second click jumps to actual image, third click zooms into that). Higher up is stronger. Farther to the right is stiffer (not steel). Both axes are logarithmic. Most data is published by various manufacturers. I have personally verified a few of these numbers with my own equipment. VERTICAL AXIS So the vertical axis is tensile strength. It's measured by pulling on a cylinder of material from each end until it breaks. Divide the force by the cross sectional area and you get the strength in psi (pounds per square inch) or MPa (mega pascals) for those who prefer metric (like me). Anyway this is kind of complicated because the materials towards the left are quite stretchy and long before their breaking point the parts are damaged. The point where it won't bounce back is the yield strength but I choose the ultimate aka breaking strength. Or whichever was higher (some materials actually start to get weaker again - like steel. Or PLA). Now the weakest material shown, PP is actually showing the yield strength - it is actually much stronger than you would think so this is unfair. But the machine that UM used to test PP wasn't long enough to test this value (the part never broke). HORIZONTAL AXIS This is the tensile young's modulus wherever possible (sometimes it's the flexural modulus which is close enough). This is tricky and complicated but for the most part indicates how stretchy/flexible a material is. So ninjaflex on the left edge has very similar flexibility to a rubber band. Most nylons (except shapeways) are much more flexible than PLA or ABS and this makes them very tough. Materials to the upper left will be tough as hell. In fact anything to the left of and including "nylon UM" can probably be driven over by a car and come out just fine afterwards. Or a tank. Or you can throw it against a brick wall with full strength or hit it with a hammer. Most of those materials in most shapes can handle it. Tough. Materials to the lower right are more likely brittle (hence glass is the most brittle). XT is probably somewhat brittle among filaments (I've never tried it). Materials to the right tend to be hard. The hardness scale and the modulus are closely intertwined. Things to the right are harder, to the left are softer. Specific Materials The table that created the graphs here is at the bottom of this post. Red materials above are for comparison and are not filaments. ABS is shown in green above - this shows how different people testing the same material get different results. Most of these tests (maybe all) were done on printed parts which will be a bit down and to the left of injection molded parts. Two different companies tested Taulman Nylon 645. With professional equipment and also got different values hence the two data points. UM=Ultimaker in the chart. XT is colorfabb. POMC is delrin. I'm very skeptical about nylforce CF specs. If someone wants to send me some I'll print and test it with my stress/strain machine. In the graph above there are a few points to keep in mind. Materials with low softening temp are the easiest to print because they don't warp much in the temperature range from this temperature to room temp. It's only about 30C difference. As you move to the right the yellow group of materials is a little harder - parts are more likely to warp off the bed so you need to learn some tricks. Maybe. They really aren't much worse. The orange area with ABS and other materials are tricky now for a few reasons - they don't stick as well to the bed, you are now getting into materials with layer adhesion issues so you need to lower the fans, the bed takes much longer to heat up - you really need to enclose the printer to raise air temp to around 35C to get decent quality. The red group needs nozzles that can go over 300C (no teflon please!) and print beds that can go to 150C and ambient air in the printer at 80C. So this requires special equipment. Also as you move to the right your materials can handle working environments of higher temperature. The green materials can't handle a car with windows rolled up on a hot sunny day (neither can a human for that matter). The yellow materials can handle this but can't handle boiling water. The orange materials can handle boiling water. SOFTENING TEMP (horizontal axis) In the graph above the horizontal axis is a mythical characteristic called "softening temp". For many of these materials in the green and yellow area I have tested them myself personally by sticking them in hot water. Above a certain temp they can be easily bent and when they cool a few degrees they stay in the new shape. That's what I call the softening temp but in reality this value came from HDT (heat deflection temp) or glass temp in other cases or functional temperature in other cases. It's a mixed bag. So it's very approximate! Normally you want the heated bed at a temperature a bit above this temperature such that the material is soft enough to flex a little and spread out the warping forces. PRINTING TEMP (vertical axis) Also somewhat arbitrary as some materials like PLA have a wide range of printing temps. Also variation in heater block design and variations in nozzle length, filament diameter, airflow touching nozzle, and more - affect what this temp should be. But it is a good place to start. Mostly I'm just showing that the red materials need special equipment to print them. The green, yellow, and orange materials can all mostly be printed by most printers no problem. In table below, take all values with a grain of salt. Especially temperatures. For tensile modulus notes read "horizontal axis" paragraph far above. For tensile strength read "vertical axis" far above. For softening temp - please read "softening temp" paragraph above. I've already fixed several mistakes in the table below but ONLY on the website - please go my website for better data! gr5 materials
    1 point
  3. Hi guys, Thanks for trying out this feature, seeing some great examples already! I head a great time building it (was part of a research sprint, aka do whatever you want but deliver something awesome/useful)! As @ahoeben indicated, this will be in the 3.2 (beta) version of Cura, which is due in roughly 1 week. The stable version will go out about 2 weeks later. We're very interested in hearing how we can improve this feature in the future as well! - Chris
    1 point
  4. It worked really fine! Temp error only above 403 degrees... guess I’ll try printing at 400 and see what heapens... can’t thank you enough for you support!
    1 point
  5. Testing the first step for a better neosanding What’s new? Process layer with a 1-2mm horizontal expansion so the effect doesn’t suffer on small areas where a normal sanding would have way too much travel jumps. Changed the Z offset of the Sanding layer to -0.03 / -0.05 to actually ‘dig’ into the printed part and really sand / scratch. This isn’t Ironing but actually it does sand the surface. Extrusion must be removed completely or the nozzle drips when doing the sanding on areas where nothing is printed. I retract 4mm just before moving the Z. Ofc I use directdrive so the length will change for others. First tests at 0.1 nozzle size (for super smooth finish) show great promise. All done ofc in S3D, and the thing that I can’t do on s3d to improve this: - Force a one single pass (without travel hops). I hotfix this by increasing the expansion or making a custom shape of the area to sand. The results on Greentec are incredible. The surface looks almost without any extrusion and saves me a good 5minutes post process for each print. The speed should be pretty fast or overheat occurs. I use 100mm/s Also important point. I use Ruby nozzle. It’s so hard that it doesn’t suffer from scratching/sanding the surface but a brass or common nozzle might need slower speeds with extra fan to avoid extra dripping or damaging the print.
    1 point
  6. Feeder don’t care, will use a Bondtech > Yep, that will work fine Print head Olsson block - don’t care, will covert to 3D Solex Matchless V3. Is it possible to mod the UM2 head with that? Yes, though I'm not sure there will be any benefit vs a standard Olsson block Stronger heater - already ordered a set of 50W, I wonder if 2x 50W will get you into trouble with the available power, power management is an issue for some people already Spring vs. alu ring above the coupler - does that make a difference? The difference is in the life span of the PTFE, with the alu ring it will last longer if used correctly, if not used correctly you may have a increased risk of leakage, You can also print this spacer iso getting the alu one, models on YouMagine Fans and cabling: one was a different hotend Fan and how it’s connected (UM2 always on, UM2+ controlled by firmware?) ? Is it the same fan? If you connect the 2th head directly it will be always on, if you use the extra electronics board of Mark2 it will be controlled (both hot end fan and side fan) The fan shroud is optimized on the 2+. Could print one. indeed, i like this one; https://www.youmagine.com/designs/um2-dual-nozzle-fan-shroud And wasn’t there something with the model fans, too? Are they same or different? you mean the side fans? think they are the same, they need to support PWM, when you get the Mark2 electronics board they will be controlled separately, otherwise the fans of head 1 and 2 will always be on at the same time (=more noise even when printing single extrusion, so get the electronics board...)
    1 point
  7. Looks like the option "Avoid printed parts when traveling". It's in the "Travel" section of the settings, you can also specify the distance to the part. But you have to make these settings visible first like described in the manual.
    1 point
  8. If I am reading this correctly, if you choose to get email notifications, you will get notifications whenever someone comments on a thread. That means if there are 10 comments on a thread, it will then send you 10 notifications? No matter what? I thought that checking that " Only send one email notification for content I follow until I revisit the community " would mean that if someone commented on a thread, it would send an email for that thread. If someone else commented on that thread, I should not get an email since I've limited it to one email until I 'revisit the community.' Emails. I do not like to get binged or pushed or anything like that. I go to the email to check in when I am not busy, otherwise it is a bother for me. I get an email every time someone comments on a thread. I hope I have not muddied the waters more, or the communications part of me brain is a bit wonky this AM.
    1 point
  9. It is a feature that has been available through "Per Model Settings" for a long time (I think since Cura 2.4 or so), but it will be made much more prominent in Cura 3.2 (expect a beta in around 1.5 week). See https://github.com/Ultimaker/Cura/pull/2758 specifically the part at the beginning of the (slow-to-the-tooth) gif animation. As for your other question, yes it is fairly normal for issues in prints to be non-symmetric, since the printhead is not symmetric; though there's fans on both sides of the head, the left extruder is closer to the left fan. So when you print with the left extruder, the cooling is a bit different from the left then from the right. What you could do is rotate the part 90 degrees to see if that helps.
    1 point
  10. It will be part of Cura 3.2. Expect a beta in around 1.5 week.
    1 point
  11. The ridgid spacer, which you can just as easily print yourself using one of the models @conny_g linked to, will prevent the PTFE/TFM coupler from "lifting" causing internal leaks of hot filament that will, over time, degrade the coupler prematurely. With that spacer and the newer TFM coupler you can easily print thousands of hours before replacing it. You can get it from your nearest Ultimaker reseller also. They may not have it listed in their webshops...but they sell it...since its a spare part for your UM2+. (Here is the part in the Swedish resellers store) Note: This model is created by the inventor of the Olsson Block...so you can be sure it works Side note: Yes @rajilpahuja, using all capitals is commonly considered "screaming" and most people do not like it, or skip reading such posts
    1 point
  12. Oui 0,6 pour le bois si tu n'as pas de bondtech et 0.4 pour le reste. Cura gère sans problème les deux diamètres et niveau rendu seul ta calibration déterminera la qualité visuelle.
    1 point
  13. Why are you yelling at me? https://newrepublic.com/article/117390/netiquette-capitalization-how-caps-became-code-yelling
    1 point
  14. @rebekah_harper, are you not on W10? That seems to be giving people nightmares. I agree that going back to the version that worked solid for you may be the way to go. Wishing you luck there Bex!
    1 point
  15. Nice to hear! Did the firmware upgrade also solved your controller issue? Have fun with your UMO -- it is a great printer!
    1 point
  16. If permissions are correct and Cura still does not want to talk to your UMO, you can reflash manually. First you need to install the 'avrdude' package, then ensure you have the right firmware file. The UMO+ needs a file named 'MarlinUltimaker-UMOP-250000.hex' Then you need to cast the following spell: avrdude -C /etc/avrdude.conf -v -p atmega2560 -c wiring -P /dev/ttyACM0 -b 115200 -D -U "flash:w:MarlinUltimaker-UMOP-250000.hex:i" That's it!
    1 point
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