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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/15/2018 in all areas

  1. Hi guys, At the end of this year, I would like to share my design of a multi-nozzle tool head. A year ago I've posted some results of dual material 3d printing on my DIY Ultimaker 2 on G+ ( G+ link) I said there I used a different approach which has not been implemented (at least I didn’t find) elsewhere. Well, the nozzle changing idea I came up with was inspired by the multi-lens microscope (where three or four lenses are distributed around an axis, mounted on a plate. To change from one to another, one can simply rotate the whole plate so that the lens engaging is pointing towards the object). Took this idea, I replace the lenses with nozzles. For example, given three E3D kraken style heat breaks, heat blocks and nozzles distributes around a slightly leaned axis, at an even angle. The axis is leaned at a certain angle to ensure the nozzle engaged will be pointing perpendicularly towards the heated bed. Then the heat breaks will be inserted and mounted into a single heatsink. At the top of the heatsink a large 6807zz bearing is inserted to ensure the rotation with the given axis. Actually we use two bearings for the axis to avoid wobbling when performing the rotation. But a free rotation is not what we want, for the engaged nozzle will rotates away by fiction. To implement the intermittent rotation, I used the Geneva mechanism, as you can see the Geneva wheel is fixed in the back side of the heatsink. So that the drive gear rotates, drives the Geneva wheel rotates. And when the engaged nozzle is printing, Geneva wheel is constrained so that the rotation freedom is eliminated. To drive the gear, many approaches can be used. For simplicity, I took the mechanical way (inspired by the Ultimaker 3). I used a rack to drive the gear. So that if the rack is pushed from either sides, the drive gear rotates. To do that, two rods must be mounted on each sides of the printer, so that if the tool head moves towards the end of the rod, the rack will be pushed. Then a printed pivot part will connects these components together. The pivot part is also good for holding all the wires and Bowden tubes, which will be connected to the nozzles. Then comes with the printed enclosure and two fans. The left axial fan is for cooling the heatsink, and the right blower fan is for cooling the printed parts. Finally, at the bottom a sheet metal piece is mounted to the enclosure to prevent oozing from un-used nozzle. Also a printed shroud guides the air flow out from the blower fan to the printed parts. Currently the whole tool head design can be used as a module for UM2. The rack can be pushed by two rods which are fixed on two sides of the wall of the UM2 machine. As you may see here currently only two nozzles have been mounted. The repeat accuracy is impressive, I’ve printed a lot of dual-extrusion models, such as the Gyro, the traffic cone, the hand-drill and also a strandbeest I designed on thingiverse (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3263196). I’m working on the hardware and software to make three nozzle printing possible. Also, I’m trying to make this design more compact. The heatsink part needs to be simplified, improved, for easy making. And I have not give a good name for this tool head. So please help me to improve it! Any ideas, comments, names are appreciated! Also I’ve some spared parts, I’ll be very happy to help you to try this out. Best, XJ
    2 points
  2. I usually make from scratch and design, but just liked the idea of a static model.
    2 points
  3. Sorry you had issues with the printing process.....😟
    1 point
  4. Well heres my armless statue... Printed well untill.....support disaster. no closeups due to poor layer quality after this, just too much wobbling or something. Also 193 is too cool i started getting under extrusion later on which made matters worse! Ive already done a lot of remodelling and will reprint later. Im also going to clean the main screw a bit seeing as it could well be adding to the uneven layers later on.....learning.
    1 point
  5. Just finished building my Mark 2 and I thought I would share my results. First of all, I'm by no means a 3d printing expert but I think the results are pretty good. I have an original Ultimaker 2 but all replacement parts and materials I used are all China sourced. I used china made ABS filament to print the parts (about $3-4 usd per 1kg roll). Printed the cone with a mixture of Ultimaker blue PLA (came with the machine years ago) and cheap China made PLA (about $2usd per 1kg roll). Here's a first pic of my results, the first ever dual extrusion print I made. No prime towers so have head oozing where the print starts. This cleaned up ok but thinking a prime tower would have eliminated this. What I did notice is the Ultimaker PLA liquified (if that's even a word) more when heated to the same temp. So when the blue started to print it would sort of ooze over easily but not the black. I'm thinking adjustment of temperature for this extruder or changing the Z offset might help smoothen it out. Either way I'm happy with the results. I basically upgraded my machine with China made clone UM2+ type head with the Olsson block and all metal UM2+ type feeder. For about $200usd I got: 2 feeder step motors, 2 complete heads with the bowden tube/all electrical etc..., 2 aluminium feeders, extra olsson blocks, nozzles, bowden tubes, feeder gears, PT100 etc... Just to give you an idea of what this upgrade should cost. I think the only issue I had was with the bowden tube not sitting into the hot end easily but once this is in there wasn't a problem. Maybe also the nozzles aren't exactly the right size opening but I'm no expert so i can't tell the difference in quality. But considering what I paid I think the results are acceptable to me (maybe not to an expert though). Some things I realized when building the machine and testing is originally I had the feeder up high. (Now excuse the short power wires, I didn't want to spend the money on the expansion board so I just wired it up as is to see the results.) With the feeder up hight, I didn't shorten the bowden tube and as it neared the back of the machine, the stiffness of the bowden tube and filament knocked the head off the magnets. So I decided to move the feeder in the original intended location down low so the bowden tube would be the correct length. No problems now with the head falling off. Also I was able to mount the feeder upside down to get the tension screw facing the right way. Luckily I assumed the Tinkergnome firmware would have the ability to reverse the motor direction and sure enough it did! I just removed the filament guide and that's the hole I used to insert the wires. I don't even have a second spool yet! I just let it sit in a box on it's side for now. Once I make sure everything works well, I will probably clean it all up and make it presentable. I'm also going to install dual flow sensors to see how it all works out. But so far great project! Well worth the effort.
    1 point
  6. It would be helpful to see the complete layer 9 but I'm guess that it ends up with some skin partially covering the 3 big holes. Anyway, you have 2 options: (1) use support or (2) make the skin on layer 9 completely cover the holes and then drill them out when the part has completed. The skin only needs to be a single layer thick. I use this technique always when I have a small diameter hole directly above a larger diameter hole (i.e. when you have a nut trap or similar. Here's what I mean... Hope this helps!
    1 point
  7. Thank you all for your kind comments The Model is fully printed NO paint work involved, except for the lettering on the front which is marker pen on raised txt. I used print temp 195 Fillamentum Vertigo Grey Fillamentum Ruby Red Fillamentum Traffic yellow Colour Fab Mat Black A std Grey (was a sample from a show) And Elixire Gold Rush for the Bling Bling (which I hated to print with no good for small parts) to much z scarring and could not get S3D to print with it, I had to use Cura all the other parts where printed with S3D Glad you all liked it.
    1 point
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