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neotko

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neotko last won the day on May 11

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About neotko

  • Birthday 09/14/1977

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  1. I’m my personal experience the bootup of um2 boards usually are due a bad heater. It’s easy to debug, heat bed for X minutes (same as the time needed to reboot while printing). Then turn off. Then heat hotend for the same time (or more ofc). Then finally if doesn’t fail heat both hotend and bed for X minutes, if only then fails it might be the psu, otherwise is a heater block
  2. The slower the acceleration and jerk the bigger the issue. Assuming you have a um2 it should be 3000/20 Try to print it rotated 45 degrees. If the problem goes away I would triple check also x/y alignment of the axis
  3. You are forgetting an important factor when pointing out the slicer. Cura has control over acceleration and jerk, check a print done with one slicer and other doesn’t prove a thing. Speed vs temperature is the reason of that visual error. I was giving examples of layer heights as a guide, not a recipe. Cura is more focus-based on click-print recipes, but every object has his needs. Just print 3 benchys at the same time and see how at least 1 is perfect, and possibly 1 is meh and 1 is bad
  4. This an issue of any fdm. At 0.15-0.2 layers the time at that point shortens and it’s a small loop followed by different size infill. It’s easy to understand if you check the gcode preview what happens there. Since there’s no slicer out there that can compensate time va heat va flow, the temperature for that 2 layers changes making the print show a visual defect. Its the same effect that happens when a small island is detached from the model, as soon time and head stays more time on an area the difference from flow/temperature makes a visual defect. The solution is to print everything slower/cooler, that’s why this doesn’t show as much on 0.06-0.1 Also some materials show more this than others just because at different mm3 the filament stays ‘hot’ more time, shifting the color. So as soon the filament prints with delay (at that height suddenly it has 4 jerk slowdowns (max speed to change direction) the filament stays more time on the hotend, so is actually hotter than the filament of the lower layers that does suffer less jerks because the nominal extrusion speed is easier to achieve). Chechk your gcode with a good analyzer like https://www.gcodeanalyser.com/ and you will see a big slowdown on the affected area
  5. I did at that time of test, also got a x/y shift months after. In the end like I say on the other post I just moved out to duet3d and been enjoying the quality of life of a proper 32bit cpu with trinamic steppers. Happy printer, happy life
  6. Looks nice and clean, my only 'but' is that the heat craw will go up affecting the small boards and the printed part. The smothers easily get to 60-70C so you better print that on something else than pla or that enclosure will deform just like the plastic covers they sell with them. The other issue of the smoothers is the torque is reduced, so if you get a x/y slipping change the travel speed for non printing moves. I also observed a lot of torque lost on the extruder, so check that if you print at the limit or raise the hotend temperature to compensate the torque. For reference
  7. Also @hugoboc check duet3d forum, lots of users there, very experienced on mods and hacks
  8. I did ‘cut’ the psu to the board cutting the plug, I remember someone making a convert cable from um psu to plug, but can’t find it. They have been working absolutely fantastic on my 3 printers, would never to back to atmega or no wifi boards. I have them plug into a switch with buttons to turn of each printer cutting the power, but frankly I only turn them off in vacation and since you can upload the gcodes by wifi and do everything like reset, etc, I never actually turn them off. The config.g needs some work, and I would recommend to move the Z endstop to the top (like umo+) to save time, but duet3d you can plug a bed z sensor and do a mesh calibration if you want (I don’t do that). Overall the biggest difference is that you can rebuild everything (temp, sensors, fans, etc) by editing a gcode file, no need to reflash or prehistoric stuff.
  9. Impressive extra options. I wish someone fix your mac, great work
  10. That's not 'um3' magic, that's just another program But, you could do that on a Duet3D, more rustic, but totally doable since um3 doesn't pop the print out and like in 99% of the printers you need to go there, remove the print and go to your station. As 'magic' I mean the heat/cold sequence to print, the amps control to manage the weak PSU. Ofc if you mean as 'magic' the start-end sequence that the Core need to avoid clogging hard, ok, that's the linux firmware pythons.
  11. Sorry I love hour idea, but somehow isn’t easier to put a duet3d board, a better PSU (the only real work the um3 linux board does is to control the amps use of each head). 99% of the magic of um3 is all cura. You could also use mark2 firmware (that does that 1% magic cura can’t) and have a um2.5 working with a bit of effort but less money. As for um3 firmware they never released the source, (github style) but you can download the restore boot image and current firmware if you google a bit inside the forum and their website. Anyhow, good luck and keep modding!
  12. Fun fact. I found out about ironing (neosanding) year before writing about it, because forcing the second pass does indeed strength the parts. The way I use it is to print 2 parts that actually hit and reprint on the same area, then neosand it. I never published it because everyone would ask for ‘scientific proof’ and I don’t have the time to do the necessary tests. This being said, my proof is that 2 delicate items stopped snapping on poat office after I realized this 🙂 Slighly better explained on my twitter
  13. Ahh I get it now! Ty!
  14. Why not combing on infill? From precision point of view, it should be desired to avoid dripping on areas where the object should not have material. It's a recommendation for the printer model to avoid grinding or just is from the theory that 'dripping where you don't see doesn't matter' ? Because that's a very subjective matter.
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