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kmanstudios

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About kmanstudios

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  1. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ Rit Dye is a textile colour dye, so yeah, I would think so.
  2. Food colours are not light-fast, i.e. will fade. I can only remember seeing Rit Dye used. Yeah, you are right about that.
  3. Absolutely. Great for rougher, organic types of things, but in no way for anything really functional. I have never seen a smooth print made from them, no matter the brand or artist.
  4. My next installment will have links to the types of metallic. chrome and chameleon powders to create different affects. I have almost finished the 'Fairy wings' project and will get back to regular posts about different prints. I did see your post of the sculpt you did. I can see a lot of potential with painting. πŸ™‚ It is a very nice sculpt.
  5. You can make your own with nylon filament. Follow from there. I know it is not gloss, but you can always put on your own gloss. This way you can create your own colour schemes.
  6. The filament was just TPLA. It is the paint that makes the difference. I am documenting how I paint things here: I have not gotten around to documenting how I did the weird critters. But I will be once I get some extra paint. But in short, it was Spaz Stix holographic paint. They make several varieties.
  7. 'Pause at height' does indeed work in Arachne. I just tested it out a day or two ago on a long print.
  8. I think your two examples best sum up what to look for visually. You can see the pocket and hole clearly and then completely fubar in the other view. I also wonder what people are doing when they go into the 'experimental section' and just click. I know why I did it, but cannot assume for others. I do remember early on how I had to learn this: Slice, see, make change, slice, then see change again. Repeat until things look right. I also remember clicking on 'close holes' on an inset circular design and it just capped everything into a cylinder. It did not make sense to m
  9. That is grinding on the filament and can happen with any filament if the feeder is not properly adjusted. You can see that the grinding also creates raised areas that really make it difficult to move through the bowden tube. This then increases the likelihood of more grinding and can really make the filament hard to get out of the feeder or tube. I have even had to take the feeder apart to get the pieces that broke off, or just a lot of other debris that makes life much more difficult. This is solid on what to look for and do. πŸ‘
  10. πŸ˜‚ The obvious caveat though is, "Do people not check their slice to see what is happening. It is not like it is guess work really. Exactly πŸ™‚ That's proof of why I do not think this has engineering purposes. But for artistic, non-functional printing, it is a fun, helpful oddity in slicing. But, seriously, check the slice before any printing, no matter what is being prepped for printing.
  11. I enjoy the feature. Sometimes, when I am printing without supports (designed that way) there may be times that I have inadvertently put an angle here or there that would create an issue when printing. The 'make overhang printable' lets me turn that on without ruining the whole print as well as means I do not have to go back into sculpting the piece. I would say that it has to do more with artistic prints than engineering though. Shape before slicing. You can see the hollows in the scooped areas. Sliced without overhang printable. Slice follows scoops as modeled.
  12. When it grinds, it creates ridges that can slow down the filament or even stop it in the bowden tube. Whenever I have this issue, I pull out the material (or unload) and make sure it does not have grin marks that cut into the filament.
  13. Check to see if the material has not been grinded until it cannot move. The material empty notification is also because material is not moving, not just finished.
  14. I have never experienced any of those issues you described. I have not used support blocker since upgrading to Cura 4.8. I am wondering what printer you are using with Cura.
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