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Lindeke

Object too tall - what went wrong here?

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20150731_124547.thumb.jpg.a48d9ec4c4525e115e67ff0e9b9a651d.jpg

This was a 23 hour print that went wrong with about 4 hours to go. It reached a height of 10.7 cm and then it all went wrong. The print just got knocked to the side and it became a mess.

In Cura it said 'Print one at a time mode disabled, object too tall'. As it only is one object, that didn't seem like a problem to me.

However, I scaled the same vase down till it was 10.7 cm tall, which didn't give me the 'object too tall' warning anymore, and it printed just fine.

How do I print taller objects?

Thanks in advance!

20150731_124547.thumb.jpg.a48d9ec4c4525e115e67ff0e9b9a651d.jpg

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You can ignore the "too tall" error. That's unrelated.

If the object was knocked over your best fix is to have it stick better. My objects stick so well I often have to remove the glass and chill it and then spend 5 minutes getting the damn part off without breaking the glass.

The primary tricks to getting it to stick well: heat, glue, brim, squish. Using any 1 of these tricks will make a big difference, use all 4 tricks all the time and you never have part coming off the bed, you can pick up the whole machine by that vase and swing the machine around you.

standard "make it stick" notes:

=======

lifting corners, curling corners, part sticking to glass

1) Make sure the glass is clean if you haven't cleaned it for a few weeks. You want a very thin coat of PVA glue which is found in hairspray, glue stick, wood glue. If you use glue stick or wood glue you

need to dilute it with water - about 5 to 10 parts water to 1 part glue. So for example if you use glue stick, apply only to the outer edge of your model then add a tablespoon of water and spread with a

tissue such that you thin it so much you can't see it anymore. wood glue is better. hairspray doesn't need to be diluted. When it dries it should be invisible. This glue works well for most plastics.

2) Heat the bed. This helps the plastic fill in completely (no air pockets) so you have better contact with the glass. For PLA any temp above 40C is safe. I often print at 60C bed.

3) heat the bed (didn't I already say that?). Keeping the bottom layers above the glass temp of the material makes it so the bottom layers can flex a bit (very very tiny amount) and relieve the

tension/stress. For PLA 60C is better than 50C. 70C is even better but then you get other "warping" like issues at the corners where they move inward but if you are desperate it's worth it. For ABS you

want 110C (100C is good enough).

4) rounded corners - having square corners puts all the lifting force on a tiny spot. Rounding the corner spreads the force out more. This is optional if you use brim.

5) Brim - this is the most important of all. Turn on the brim feature in cura and do 10 passes of brim. This is awesome.

6) Squish - make sure the bottom layer is squishing onto the glass with no gaps in the brim. The first trace going down should be flat like a pancake, not rounded like string. don't run the leveling

procedure if it is off, just turn the 3 screws the same amount while it is printing the skirt or brim. Counter clockwise from below gets the bed closer to the nozzle. Don't panic, take a breath, think about

which way to move the glass, think about how the screw works, then twist. This may take 30 seconds but it's worth it to not rush it. You can always restart the print.

If you do all this you will then ask me "how the hell do I get my part off the glass?". Well first let it cool completely. Or even put it in the freezer. Then use a sharp putty knife under a c

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