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Hi,

I would like to know which software do you use for 3D-Construction?

until now I'm using Sketchup which is kind of a housewife's CAD-Software.

But I have to often problems that Cura does not slice in the right way regardless which options I use

keep open, close Type A, close Type B. There is too often wrong slicing.

So I'm looking for a 3D-CAD-software that's not overcrowded with special functions, intuitive to work with

I don't need things like parametrisation. (especially NOT OpenSCAD if I want to code I code for microcontrollers or delphi but I really don't want to code for 3D-objects)

thanks in advance for hints and links

best regards

Stefan

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The best 3D modelling CAD systems, as far as I'm aware, are all parametric: SolidWorks, Catia, ProEngineer, and Alibre to name but a few. They are all expensive and have a rather steep learning curve. But there's a new kid on the block: Autodesk Fusion 360. Its been out for a year or so, and is extremely powerful, plus, unlike the previously mentioned systems, its FREE for hobbyists, students and enthusiasts. It also has a rather super additional feature - T-spline modelling: its rather like moulding a lump of clay in 3D.

Do a Google for Fusion 360 and have a look at some of tutorials and videos - there's lots there.

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Hello Stefan,

I prefer "Cubify Invent" 49$ (there is also "Cubify Design" for 150$).

I designed many 3d objects for my projects with "Cubify Invent". Buy it, learn it in ono or two days and start your own design. For me Cubify Invent really enough but who needs more file formats he can choose also the Cubify Design version. (Cubify Invent = Cubify Design = Alibre Design). You can also download both demo trial softwares from Cubify.com.

Regards

Niyazi

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I recommend you try From Z, there is a free version Form Z Jr..

IMO, one of the easiest packages to get good quality results with a little training, they have some good you tube videos which help you learn the basics quickly!

GBR1

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This is a hard question to answer as what can work for me make confusing for you.

It all comes down to what type of design you want to do. Most cad software are specific to a certain type of design. So decide on that first.

I recommend trying as many as you can to find what works for you best and Google for "how to" tutorials. You will need to learn how to use some features so it helps if there are a lot of demos.

I found onshape worked best for me. It's based on solidworks and that's what I used in the past. It also has videos showing how to use every feature and how to draw some objects.

But you may find design spark or fusion360 is easier for your mind set.

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This is a hard question to answer as what can work for me make confusing for you.

It all comes down to what type of design you want to do.

Agreed. You'll get a whole lot of answers here about which is best. It's like asking what's the best ice cream flavor.

I bounced around looking for something that suited my needs and my budget, and ended up using Onshape for most everything. It's fast, smooth, and doesn't crash like Alibre :-)

Chris

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I'm not a CAD designer, i'm learning as i use the softwares.

For basic stuff, i liked DesignSparkMechanical, it's easy to use and effective.

Lately i've been playing around with Fusion 360, and i love it, it's fairly easy to use, very powerfull and free as mentionned. There are quite a lot of tutorials on youtube also which is always good to have

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Another vote for Fusion and it's (I guess) big brother Inventor.

RS also have a free tool called Design Spark Mechanical - not the easiest in the world to get started with, but it is free and it's got pretty much everything you need for a parametric CAD system.

For me, it has to be parametric, but most of my stuff is engineering or product based.

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It is funny. Good thing about young people is they can adopt very easily and haven't been taught many bad habits. but older people it can be a bit of "can't teach an old dog new tricks" kind of thing and it's easier to learn things that are similar to what they have already been taught. I just can't believe there are so many users of openscad.

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I have zero cad knowledge and until 7 months ago I didn't used any 3d software (since 18-19 when I learned to use the very very old caligari truespace and then some 3dsmax). The software I use now it's rhinoceros. It's easy I think and you get use to type the commands and also imports really well from illustrator which I use a lot to place texts and stuff. I started to learn 3d and got into 3dprint because my eyeglasses broke and decided to make my own frame and with the way rhino let's you curve objects and deform them from a simple extrude it was really easy (but hard as hell to do it right because I have zero cad knowledge).

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Fusion 360 and Inventor - the power under their hoods is phenomenal - you can take a design and print it or run it through an add on and mill it (the new addition to my printers is a shapeoko!) and parameters are wicked - not only in the initial design, but then for updates of it or links to other designs - you can really leverage the data.

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What i like with Fusion 360 is the history, you can be close to finishing your design but you need to change something done in the beginning, you can go back to that feature, change it, and all that has been done after will be re-processed, as long as you don't change big things it works pretty nicely.

Also it has a sculpting environnement which let's you do nice and complex things, and it's quite straight forward to use.

And lastly, you can render your design, which is pretty cool too :)

I'm totally convinced by it as you may notice :)

I was using DesignSpark Mechanical before which is quite easy to use and learn but i had some limitation and sometimes i would run in problems that made me go back to the first step of the design. It remains my second liked software though

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Fusion 360 Design history is indeed one really cool feature. Going back in the history and just changing that whole diameter is priceless.

An additional thing to mention about Fusion 360 is it's import capabilites if you are coming from a program like 123D Design or similar beginner type software.

Also, all your designs are stored in the cloud BUT you can also work offline... so not much worry with regards to data loss.

I am 39 ;). In general I think with each piece of fairly complex software (like inventor, F360 and the others) you will require a few iterations of designs. So, you design a few things and you get better and better... with each try. So my recommendation is pick one and stick to it at least in the beginning.

Only my thoughts... coming from 123D Design, and have had some limited history with 2D and 3D Design.

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Any tutorial videos you guys can suggest to get my 45 year old brain into gear :D

 

In general, the fusion 360 channel is pretty good:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiMwMz3RMbW5mbx0iDcRQ2g

They have multiple playlists to choose from, go with the "Fusion 360 Training" to start with... should be doable also for 45 and up as they are normaly just below 15 mins or shorter. :)

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I think Zbrush is VERY easy if you can draw (as its a sculpting program), its plays with tris and quads well too, and does nice retopology. I personally believe 3DSMAX to be very easy and intuative. I also use Maya, but everything in maya tends to be more menu driven and needs more tweaking where as max will have built in plugins for it. But Zbrush can do very nice flat geometrical stuff too and all upgrades to new versions are free. Id stick to 3dsmax when doing simple shapes its, childs play. Im glad i learnt it (pre-internet) when i did. I just picked up Zbrush a few months back and only used it a few times, but i got what i wanted out of it, so it means it works as I expect, unlike programs like illustrator, which you need to google practically anything you want to achieve on it, thats one program that is great but i hate using it as its got to have the slowest workflow know to man, I honestly think its impossible to work quickly in Illustrator as in other programs. Now days i just do my vector work in After Effects and then import it into illustrator to save time pissing around constantly reselecting all the vector points by accident in Illustrator.

Find a program that works for you thats the advice id give, basically download them all (trials if you want to go the legal route) or torrent them (the not so legal route) and try them all out. Remember some programs do thing better than others, for example shells. Maya is lame at doing complex shells and they are full of spikes, and Max has no problems at all and will produce flawless shells. just minor stuff like that which makes a huge help, as shell thickness is very important unless you print everything solid and just decide in cura, which i personally wouldn't recommend as it will always result in more filament use. I try and save on filament at all costs, like games developers will polygons, the less used the better.

Edited by Guest

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+1 for Rhino. I began 3D modeling only a few months ago and use it daily. It is very intuitive and tutorials are readily available. It probably helps that I took architecture and drafting in high school ~25 years ago, but we were drawing blueprints by hand, not CAD (using those stinky ammonia gas printers).

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I use DSM also. I was able to create things immediately but it took me a month to be as fast in DSM as I had been in sketchup. It takes a while to learn a new cad system. It takes a long time before you learn all the shortcut keys and memorize ways to rotate and switch modes without thinking about it and understanding all the several dozen ways to take advantage of "pull". The "push/pull" feature in DSM is, well, overwhelming in it's abilities and incredibly useful. And confusing (there's the alt-select blue part and then the shift select orange part and then the modes of pull).

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I just received my 2016 SolidWorks Academic version this week.

I'll be honest, it is complete and utter overkill for anything I will ever need.

But at $20, under the Military Veteran's Academic Version Program, it's a great deal.

I would like to check out the simpler programs you guys have mentioned.

I would also like to suggest subscribing to Lynda.com The tutorials are top notch and I can't say enough good about them. They've helped me get back up to speed on many things (Javascript, Visual Basic and C#)

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