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Kadows

Infill not touching wall

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Hi,

I got my Ultimaker Original + about 1 week ago. The printer prints amazing and it has really brought back the joy of 3D printing for me. I did have some small problem along the way but I managed to figure most of them out. Except this one.

As you can see on these pictures the infill does not go all the way to the wall at one end of the print. On the other end its fine.

Affected end:

JC8YQIm.jpg

Other end:

LJec6lv.jpg

How it looks in Cura:

l0m6lHA.jpg

I have tried everything I can think of. Different speeds and layer height, temperatures, re leveled the bed, different filament. All look the same. For the most part the prints turn out fine, but this can show in the top layer too, and that obliviously affect the strength of the part.

Any ideas?

Thanks,

-Fredrik

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You likely just have a bit of backlash caused by the short belts not being quite tight enough. The images here show an UM2 but the same applies for the UMO:

http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/23-a-visual-ultimaker-troubleshooting-guide#circles

You might also want to check the squareness of the head.

Edited by Guest

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You likely just have a bit of backlash caused by the short belts not being quite tight enough. The images here show an UM2 but the same applies for the UMO:

http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/23-a-visual-ultimaker-troubleshooting-guide#circles

You might also want to check the squareness of the head.

 

When you say the short belts, you are talking about the really short ones going on the motors, right? I did tighten down the motors pretty hard, but I will try it again.

Also, what do you mean about the squareness of the head? Can I read about this somewhere?

Thank you!

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Yes, I mean the belts on the motors.

IIRC I read about someone that had a similar problem and the issue in that case was that the wooden parts of the head where not perfectly square. The head is built out of 6 wooden pieces and in his case these were assembled so that the head had a slight rhombus shape rather than a square shape.

But the most common cause is slack in the short belts (or excessively tight ones that cause friction).

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