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jackseers3

3d scanner, what to buy?

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Hey guys,

I'd like to add a 3d scanner to my box of toys but I'm not sure what to look for.

There seem to be some scanners out there that are $400-$800 but the posted results look really awful.

And then there are scanners 1k-2k which seem to produce nice results but are, well, pretty expensive. (not even mentioning $5k-$100k, for obvious reasons :)

So, what do I need to look out for? Is it worth spending K's of dollars if i want to get really nice scans?

Do you guys own a 3d scanner that you are really happy with?

Please tell me about it.

-jack

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I am also looking for a good 3D scanner, and right now the Einscan-S is the best quality and price combinations.

when looking for a scanner, don't bother with scanners that can't scan 0.1mm or better.

with the 0.1mm accuracy, you can scan and object and enlarge the part, with all other cheap scanners you just get an overall shape with little detail, and an image overlay to pretend there is detail.

I have been saving up for this scanner, but also heard rumors about a newer and better version in the works, I still have to decide what to do :)

The einscan setup is very easy, and I have seen some great results, of the software is also very functional en get updated regularly.

 

Here is a forum that talks about the Einscan, and also has developers responding to questions.

http://3dprintboard.com/forumdisplay.php?130-Einscan-S-3D-scanner

and some scan results:

pic112.jpg?t=1438456410

pic113.jpg?t=1438456429

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I am also looking for a good 3D scanner, and right now the Einscan-S is the best quality and price combinations.

when looking for a scanner, don't bother with scanners that can't scan 0.1mm or better.

with the 0.1mm accuracy, you can scan and object and enlarge the part, with all other cheap scanners you just get an overall shape with little detail, and an image overlay to pretend there is detail.

I have been saving up for this scanner, but also heard rumors about a newer and better version in the works, I still have to decide what to do :)

The einscan setup is very easy, and I have seen some great results, of the software is also very functional en get updated regularly.

 

Here is a forum that talks about the Einscan, and also has developers responding to questions.

http://3dprintboard.com/forumdisplay.php?130-Einscan-S-3D-scanner

and some scan results:

pic112.jpg?t=1438456410

pic113.jpg?t=1438456429

 

That is very impressive :)

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it looks good compared to the David, in quality (same) and price (25%) because it comes with a turntable. I guess reading the forums will give you more practical information about the details (in promotion movies everything looks great...). If you are handy you can use your own camera/projector for the David setup, just buy the software dongle, that might save you some $$.

I have the David SLS2 setup and like it very much. Don't mind the manual rotations, because it is up to the model anyway, to judge which parts to scan for the best result.

What might be something to find out is the size of the scanned object: the turntable goes up to 200mm and without turntable 700mm size. The difference is that the Einscan has its projector and camera fixed in one box, but the David has them separated. This means that for bigger objects the projector and camera can be moved to get a better focus/angle.

If your object are all in the 200mm range, I guess The Einscan-S will be a good choice,,

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Hi

I was at the TCT show and missed the Einscan have you had your hands on these yet problem I see is its Chinese and sooner or later they cut corners, my opinion? But the David I have not seen have you a link?

I ordered a Fuel3D scanner last year but cancelled it at last min, I had read some revues on the forum so thought leave it for now, but I am keen todo some scanning.

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All in all, if this were to become a released product it will be in the 1800-2000 euro price range. The software is built from scratch by me and GhostKeeper, with some odds and ends from others. The control software shares a base with Cura (eg; it also uses Uranium as a base).

The control software must be released as open source due to AGPL licence. I'm not sure when this will hapen. We're still in the phase where we're looking how the scanner is going to be brought to the market.

If people have no problem with a prototype that still needs improvement & work, we could make this work.

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One alternative is to use your SLR, taking say 30-50 pics and then use the free Autodesk 123D Catch software. I have used it a couple of times and was impressed with the result. I am not suggesting it is a solution for everyone as it may well depend on the type of object you are scanning, but you never know.

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All in all, if this were to become a released product it will be in the 1800-2000 euro price range. The software is built from scratch by me and GhostKeeper, with some odds and ends from others. The control software shares a base with Cura (eg; it also uses Uranium as a base).

The control software must be released as open source due to AGPL licence. I'm not sure when this will hapen. We're still in the phase where we're looking how the scanner is going to be brought to the market.

If people have no problem with a prototype that still needs improvement & work, we could make this work.

 

maybe bring out a limited edition beta version (hard+software) and you have a testgroup ...

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Well, I have a prototype structured light scanner. Could well be that the source code of that is open sourced soon.

 

What kind of resolution are you getting with your setup ?

smaller then 0.1mm.

I am very interested in a 3D scanner, but for small objects.

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There are two things that are important for a scanner; Resolution (How many 'samples can you take per square cm of surface that you want to scan) and accuracy (How correct are the samples).

For scanning small objects, you need both. The scanner has an accuracy of about 0.2 mm with the most simple scanning pattern. A single scan has a theoretical resolution of 1,3 million points. Depending on how close you put the item, your resolution per cm2 will change.

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There are two things that are important for a scanner; Resolution (How many 'samples can you take per square cm of surface that you want to scan) and accuracy (How correct are the samples).

For scanning small objects, you need both. The scanner has an accuracy of about 0.2 mm with the most simple scanning pattern. A single scan has a theoretical resolution of 1,3 million points. Depending on how close you put the item, your resolution per cm2 will change.

 

Do you have any examples of scans you have done with the prototype? Would you be open to having beta-testers?

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I know lazer scanners are not considered to provide the same fidelity of scan as a structured light scanner, but this one looks nice and now that its kickstarter is over its being sold at their respective online store.

Any one have any experience with the Atlas 3d scanner?

 

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Do you have any examples of scans you have done with the prototype?  Would you be open to having beta-testers?

 

It's not quite clear what I can / can't share at this point. I still expect that there will be a first limited number trial run (similar to the first Ultimakers)

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On 02.12.2016 at 5:37 PM, xeno said:

It says it has a 0.5mm resolution, this is not really fine, but it depends what you want to scan.

For me 0.1mm is the absolute minimum resolutions to get nice detailed scans, more is better, but the file size also grows :)

Well, for 0.1 resolution they have Space Spider. But as I see by my experience Eva is more than enough for most of my tasks.

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Eeek. I just have the Qlone app on my phone to scan small things 😅
Fuel3D is for other stuff. I still need practice though....

If all goes well, I might invest in an artec scanner or similar.

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I have experience with both scan in the box (around 3000 euro high resolution scanning) and the 3D sense scanner (400 euro low resolution hand held scanning) and both of them work really well. It really depends on how much detail you want. If you want more than 1mm resolution never go for handheld scanners although they are easy to work with and ideal for big products they will not give high resolution scans. Scan in the box delivers the high resolution scanner with software, it does need some getting used to but we have had some amazing results with it up to 0.1mm resolution ideal for product reproduction. 

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