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Blake215

How to stop oozing

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I have an ultimaker original plus, and it has been printing fine. Other than when it is things where it has to cross an open space to reach the area of the part that it needs to print. It ends up leaving filament along the edge and it builds up as the print progresses. I have looked up solutions such as increasing the retraction speed incrementally and stopping at 60 m/s, increasing the distance it retracts incrementally until 5.5mm, lowering the flow rate of filament to 85% incrementally, and lowering the normal printing temperature of PLA from 210 to 205. . If anyone can help that would be much appreciated because I am a beginner at 3Dorinting. Only about 3 days now.

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Photo please - this might be oozing -- or it might be something comlpetely different. Everytime I think I understand a photo is published and I realize I'm giving bad advice.

For one thing, some pla's, particularly white (doesn't matter who makes it) seem to ooze more so consider trying a different color. In general lower temp, printing slow (like 25mm/sec) but moving fast when not printing (travel moves at 150mm/sec minimum - 300mm/sec probably best).

But post a pic please.

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Photo please - this might be oozing -- or it might be something comlpetely different.  Everytime I think I understand a photo is published and I realize I'm giving bad advice.

For one thing, some pla's, particularly white (doesn't matter who makes it) seem to ooze more so consider trying a different color.  In general lower temp, printing slow (like 25mm/sec) but moving fast when not printing (travel moves at 150mm/sec minimum - 300mm/sec probably best).

But post a pic please.

 

I posted some pictures. Hopefully they help you understand what's going on.

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Side view would be nice. Well it looks like you have "stringing" in the second photo but not so much in the rest. Usually lowering temp fixes this:

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/view/2872-some-calibration-photographs

But in general they tend to be very easy to clean up. But if you lower the temp you also need to slow down.

Here are my recommended top speeds for .2mm layers (twice as fast for .1mm layers):

20mm/sec at 200C

30mm/sec at 210C

40mm/sec at 225C

50mm/sec at 240C

The printer can do double these speeds but with huge difficulty and usually with a loss in part quality due to underextrusion. Different colors print best at quite different temperatures and due to imperfect temp sensors, some printers print 10C cool so use these values as an initial starting guideline and if you are still underextruding try raising the temp. But don't go over 240C with PLA.

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