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Best clear plastic filament?


Edel

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Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

A lot of it is due to print settings. I have clear XT and PLA. If XT is printed to hot the it gets tiny bubbles which makes it cloudy. PLA can also be cloudy when I bit cold.

Using thicker layer like .2mm + helps make the print more clear.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    oh dear 0,2 is not the thinkness i normaly use for my model making... normaly 0,06...

    And i m more on PLA Site, because this filament i think i can handle best.

    but would you recomment a special suppler, like innofil or other whats best?

    for me its important to get i so clear as possible...

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    Where the layers join together it leaves a milky line. So the more layers the more milky the print will be. A print that has 0.3mm layer height has less amount of layers for the print and ends up a lot more clear. Also the clear thick layer has less light deformation so you can see through it more clearly.

    You will find THIS article help full. I have used XTC-3D and it does work but not as well as the advertisement.

    So far I have found diamond age clear PLA the best to print with so far.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    I recently published a paper that included some research about optimising transparency, I found that, contrary to the conventional wisdom, thicker layers is not the key to achieving transparency. Instead, it is avoiding under-extrusion meaning that slow printing and thin layers can give you good transparency.

    Trans2.PNG.65d886133b989d9de38bc67d590241c1.PNG

    The text in this image shows the print characteristics and is read through the device. I used Crystal Clear PLA from Fabberdashery.

    Link to the paper if you want more info: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0152023

    Trans2.PNG.65d886133b989d9de38bc67d590241c1.PNG

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    I recently published a paper that included some research about optimising transparency, I found that, contrary to the conventional wisdom, thicker layers is not the key to achieving transparency. Instead, it is avoiding under-extrusion meaning that slow printing and thin layers can give you good transparency.

    Trans2.PNG.65d886133b989d9de38bc67d590241c1.PNG

    The text in this image shows the print characteristics and is read through the device. I used Crystal Clear PLA from Fabberdashery.

    Link to the paper if you want more info: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0152023

     

    How slow? I'm brand new to 3D printing and have no idea what I'm doing. Is 30% speed good?

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    30% means nothing to most of us. 30% of what? The default cura speed? Well what's that then as each version of cura has a different default speed plus you need to know the layer height as usually we care more about *volume* versus linear speed. In cura 15.X you can hover over the linear speed to see the volume. I think cura 2.X might have this feature somewhere also. For 0.4mm nozzle I consider 1 cubic mm/sec to be slow and 10 cubic mm/sec to be about the limit of the machine (you can always go faster if you raise the temp and modify the feeder but many machines can't even do 8mm^3/sec let alone 10).

    Larger nozzles can print larger volumes. Smaller nozzles - smaller volumes.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    30% means nothing to most of us.  30% of what?  The default cura speed?  Well what's that then as each version of cura has a different default speed plus you need to know the layer height as usually we care more about *volume* versus linear speed.  In cura 15.X you can hover over the linear speed to see the volume.  I think cura 2.X might have this feature somewhere also.  For 0.4mm nozzle I consider 1 cubic mm/sec to be slow and 10 cubic mm/sec to be about the limit of the machine (you can always go faster if you raise the temp and modify the feeder but many machines can't even do 8mm^3/sec let alone 10).

    Larger nozzles can print larger volumes.  Smaller nozzles - smaller volumes.

     

    Okay, thanks. I was watching someone else operate the UM2 yesterday and I thought that a percentage was on the screen that said speed was 101%. Is the speed to use set in the GCODE file?

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    There are default printing speeds in CURA which are in mm/s these are user adjustable and can be saved in user defined profiles.

    Speed percentage can then be adjusted on the printer when it's printing. This is a percentage of your selected print speed in CURA.

    So just saying a percentage means nothing. You should never need to adjust it on the machine unless you set the wrong speed vs layer height in CURA. But in that case it's best to stop the print and reslice to get better control over your print.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    In Cura 2.3.1 the speed setting is divided into Print Speed (default 60 mm/s) and Travel Speed (default 120 mm/s) which is different from the volume-based speed of 1 cubic mm/s suggested above. Are our versions of Cura different? For a 2.85 mm filament, what setting is equivalent to 1 cubic mm/s?

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    The speed setting for all Cura versions are in mm/s but as suggested by @gr5 you can view what the cubic mm/s by hovering over the liner speed.

    (Copied from here :

    To figure out how fast you're trying to print you simply multiply your nozzle diameter with the layer height and speed. So for example, if you're printing with 0.2mm layers at 60mm/s you would do: 0.4*0.2*60 = 4.8mm 3/s.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    The speed setting for all Cura versions are in mm/s but as suggested by @gr5 you can view what the cubic mm/s by hovering over the liner speed.

    If I hover over the speed I get a blue tooltip with no mention of cubic mm:

    p83tN5q.png

    Am I doing it wrong?

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    Edited my last post about how to calculate it.

    Not at my computer at the moment but will verify how to check it if someone else doesn't before I get back to it.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    If I hover over the speed I get a blue tooltip with no mention of cubic mm:

    Am I doing it wrong?

     

    Well I just checked and you are right. Cura 2.X took the feature away. Well that sucks. So you need to multiply the layer height X nozzle width X speed.

    Or use Cura 15.X.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    I recently published a paper that included some research about optimising transparency, I found that, contrary to the conventional wisdom, thicker layers is not the key to achieving transparency. Instead, it is avoiding under-extrusion meaning that slow printing and thin layers can give you good transparency.

    Trans2.PNG.65d886133b989d9de38bc67d590241c1.PNG

    The text in this image shows the print characteristics and is read through the device. I used Crystal Clear PLA from Fabberdashery.

    Link to the paper if you want more info: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0152023

    The important (for this thread) figure from this paper is figure 6 and it basically says you need to print at 20 mm/s with 0.25 um layers or 10 mm/s with 0.5 um layers (10 mm/s with 0.25 um layers also works but I guess is slower?) for good transparency. The nozzle is presumably the default at ~0.4 um? The nozzle temperature was 215 °C for the Fabberdashery Crystal Clear PLA and print bed temperature 70 °C. Despite the better optical transparency at <20 mm/s the authors use prints at 30 mm/s. Perhaps they had already started experiments before discovering that slower was better.

    Edit: it would have been neat if they also investigated the effect of chloroform-vapour-bathing.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    I haven't tried clear PLA yet.

    But for PET I found that printing slow helps best: 20mm/s for a somewhat clear result. Temperature plays a lesser role at that slow speed: just don't print too hot (bubbles, fog), and not too cold (doesn't flow well into corners and thus leaves unfilled areas).

    A little bit of overextrusion also helps to push the melt into all holes, and to avoid voids. Try 105 or 110%.

    When the model is only a few layers thick, underlaying text shines through nicely. But the diagonal infill lines stay visible. Thicker models always get a "frosted glass" appearance. So you can't use it as a lens.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    I haven't tried clear PLA yet.

    But for PET I found that printing slow helps best: 20mm/s for a somewhat clear result. Temperature plays a lesser role at that slow speed: just don't print too hot (bubbles, fog), and not too cold (doesn't flow well into corners and thus leaves unfilled areas).

    A little bit of overextrusion also helps to push the melt into all holes, and to avoid voids. Try 105 or 110%.

    When the model is only a few layers thick, underlaying text shines through nicely. But the diagonal infill lines stay visible. Thicker models always get a "frosted glass" appearance. So you can't use it as a lens.

     

    Frosted glass is actually the exact effect I want in the end. I want it frosted enough to not be able to see the individual LED lights behind it but not much frostier so as to minimise absorption of the light. That said, I hope to not have to use more than 3 mm thick walls to do this.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    Hmm... A thought: Cura (2.3.1) has a Fuzzy option in the experimental settings. I assume it is in 2.4 as well. I wonder how Fuzzy would look for light diffracting? That might also give you interesting results for your project.

    Anyway, the thought just occurred to me. Hope it is useful. :)

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    I have coated a cylinder that was printed in transparent Nylon at around 200 micron, with xtc 3D and it got pretty clear! Not window clear but I could clearly see the 'background' (what was behind the cylinder) through it.

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    Posted · Best clear plastic filament?

    What about 3d printing for a Laptop screen protector? I have a Lenovo Y700-ACZ 80NY0006US that I need to protect. The Idea here is to make a crystal clear protector that keeps the LCD panel from being damaged. Lenovo failed to design this with an over-screen so I am stuck with buying filament and having one made for myself. If the Mod's feel this belongs in another area then fine. The question here is about Clear filaments and what the absolute 100% best one would be to use. I wouldn't mind having a custom Bezel with a single piece of clear made for it either, I think it would be a challenge to do so. I would like to enforce that this is a request to find out what the absolute best clear material for my project would be so that I get the best clarity and protection for the screen.

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