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Tim_bc

Cooling settings help for Simplify3d

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Hi,

Like many of you I've taken the plunge and have started using simplify3d. I must admit, the amount of settings that can be configured is a bit overwhelming right now, but I'm sure I'll get the hang of it soon enough.

I tried searching the forum, but I'm having a hard time finding threads about the best approach when it comes to cooling etc.

I understand the first few layers I want to keep the fans off or to a minimum for better bed adhesion, but after that I assumed I should max the fan speed out..... It cannot be this easy can it? I guess I'm slightly confused to be honest.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to approach the cooling settings in simplify3D? In particular, are there ideal layer heights where you would increase/decrease fan speeds? Would the geometry of the print itself have to be taken into account when determining fan speeds for layer heights etc?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

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All your assumptions are correct. But there's no perfect answer and sometimes depends on what you print.

S3D fans go 'on' at specific layer number, so you need to remember that if you change the print layer height (resolution) the fans will go on sooner or later.

I use to set a minimum fan at layer 4-7 and then I ramp up 10-20% each 5-10 layers. But for hard overhagns I go slow at layer 2 and increase it.

If you use glue/hairspray on the bed, or the object it's just 1 on the center of the bed, you should be able set a higher fan sooner.

Also check that bridging has a specific fan speed (if you activate the option) so you can set a higher fan for that.

It really depends on what you print. Because if you print many small objects the fan really close to the bed might kill adhesion.

Also it's a good idea to avoid a full blast, because the air will hit the hotend and will lower the temp 1-2C. Doing it progressively helps the PID keep the heat constant without big drops in temp that can affect print quality.

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Thank you for taking the time,

I did end up reading last night cura slowly ramps fan speeds up to full by the 5mm height mark I believe. So the progression you've explained makes a lot of sense.

I'll have to experiment with some prints before I go for something big. It's funny, because I felt like I was starting to get excellent results fairly consistently from Cura, but the manual supports and ability to control virtually everything in the process is a major draw towards Simplify3D.

I've also been using hairspray since I switched to ColorFabb, and it works very well, so I'm happy about not having to use a brim.

Now to just find some time to get accustom to simplify ;)

Thanks again!

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First think first. Go to preferences menu on s3d and change the setting that shows speeds from mm/m to mm/s. This way you can copy your speeds settings to s3d easier. Ofc the way s3d set speeds it's a bit different but it's just a simple % calculation.

Also change z speed to 20-25mm/s and travel speed to 150-180 since s3d has a very horrible standard settings.

Other stuff to check:

Minimum layer time makes a progressive slowdown that you can define (play with that if your model needs it).

Auto extrusion width it's just lame, if you want to make consistent prints set it at 0.40, extrusion at 100% and set the correct diameter for your filament, since the crappy default profile sets it at 3mm and most probably your filament it's 2.85mm

I have write some about s3d and posted my profile (but it's for 1.75mm filament)

On this post

Also read the other posts, something might help you.

Other very nice read it's the troubleshooting S3D guide, specially because it explains how some s3d settings work to fix some issues.

Edited by Guest

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Depends on your model, the smaller it is the more fan you need because the layer print time will be small and you want about 10 secs with fans to ensure it is cool before the next layer is printed. If you are printing a DVD case you could probably get away with no fans.

Having said that, with PLA I always run 100% fan starting at around 0.5mm high and at 100% by 1.00 to 1.2mm high. You just need to ramp it so that the extruder temp. does not plunge and cause you a problem. I normally jump in steps of 30-40% and temp drops 3 or 4 degrees which is fine for me as I do not print tiny models - with these I am guessing that with a short layer print time adding another 30% fan after 10 secs could cause you temp problems

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Depends on your model, the smaller it is the more fan you need because the layer print time will be small and you want about 10 secs with fans to ensure it is cool before the next layer is printed. If you are printing a DVD case you could probably get away with no fans.

Having said that, with PLA I always run 100% fan starting at around 0.5mm high and at 100% by 1.00 to 1.2mm high. You just need to ramp it so that the extruder temp. does not plunge and cause you a problem. I normally jump in steps of 30-40% and temp drops 3 or 4 degrees which is fine for me as I do not print tiny models - with these I am guessing that with a short layer print time adding another 30% fan after 10 secs could cause you temp problems

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