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Community Contest | a robot walks into a bar..

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Alright, stop this contest, and give them the price :)

there is no way this can be topped !

[Edit]

Let Ultimaker use this for commercial use, and give Eraser and ultimaker Extended !

the Extrusion Upgrade is too little a price for this brilliant video :)

Edited by Guest
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haha whoooo what a brilliant video! You must have been rooting for the robot the entire time :p This is everything and more I was hoping to see uploaded, amazing.

I would love to see how you build the conveyor and crank assembly! The contest is officially not yet over, but I can say you have already won my respect!

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Thanks everyone for all the kind words. Made my day.

- We spent about 12 hours shooting the scene over and over - over 75 takes for sure. We made it to the end of the run only a handful of times, but in most of those we would later discover that something wasn't right - the boat was in view when it shouldn't be, the foreground and background elements didn't line up right, the Ultibot refused to fall at the end, etc. Of course, by the time we were filming, we had already sunk so much time into the whole production that we were determined to see it through.

- I could get behind that :p

It may be premature, but I want everyone to know that what we accomplished here could be done by any one of you. I don't work for a conveyor belt company, I am not a video producer, or a graphic artist. I am in fact a patent lawyer, which is fitting giving the genesis of the walking mechanism. I made the conveyor belt and crank assembly in Fusion 360 (free for "startups and enthusiasts") which I had only minimal experience with, and Lightworks (free version) which I had never used before now (Lightworks is awesome btw).

At the outset, I thought of walking the Ultibot down a handrail of an escalator. However, once I printed the Ultibot, I soon realized as many of you did I am sure, that this was never going to happen - the slope was far too steep and the surface has far too much grip. I ended up printing the Ultibot at 1.45 scale because I could not find an M2 bolt at the hardware stores in my area.

At first, I looked for a 3D printable conveyor online but couldn't find one, so I made my own. From the start, the design was made to allow for easy disassembly and reassembly to add and remove belts as we fine tuned the components. In the first iteration, the conveyor belt slacked (bowed) in the middle between the rollers, which affected the walking angle and prevented the Ultibot from continuing to walk. So, I added the support plate under the conveyor belt to keep the angle consistent. The first conveyor also didn't include a crank mechanism - I rolled my finger along the roller to see that the idea could actually work. The crank mechanism was designed to be placed away from the conveyor belt so that the crank-person could stay out of the camera's field of view.

As rightly noted, we ran a string down the middle of the conveyor belt, which rides between the Ultibot's legs to keep him from veering off course. We had to adjust the height of the string to keep the string as low as possible without the Ultibot being able to step over the string. In fact, earlier attempts used a think printed shaft instead of the string, but it created too much friction and would eventually bring the Ultibot to a halt.

The scenery elements began with framing the field of view with the Ultibot on the treadmill and a gridded background to get the sizing right (see below). I needed to size the height of the foreground to obscure the treadmill, and size the background to make sure we could see the right balance of landscape and sky.

IMG_2336.thumb.JPG.6538030dc8e449ebabb81043da8f59f5.JPG

Then with the sizing worked out, we sketched out the entire background to scale.

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Then we traced our scale sketches onto colored papers, cut it all out, and glued it to cardboard backing.

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If I had more time, I would have designed and printed proper tracks for the foreground and background to run along, but this did the trick.

Finally, we put it all together for the shot

IMG_2336.thumb.JPG.6538030dc8e449ebabb81043da8f59f5.JPG

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IMG_2353.thumb.JPG.ed1c594946aecb7e01ebb282e72fdb55.JPG

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Hi guys, first off - amazing video, @Eraser, this is truly a great achievement! But since the contest is not over just yet and it literally took us until now to finish our contribution, here it is anyway :-)

We would like to show you the story of our two bravest robots who have walked further than any of their five ancestors before them, but still unsure whether they will ever make it out of the gloomy "Graveyard of Failed Prints":

 

The final walk was captured in a single shot without cuts or "earthquakes", overall the video resulted from experience gathered in approx. 50 shots and uses outtakes footage from an additional five of them.

All robots were printed on our Ultimaker² and learned how to walk with the aid of some 4.3 mm blind rivets, and it sure was a blast preparing for this contest! If only we had seen it a bit earlier... :p

Greetings from Heidelberg Makerspace!

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First of all I wanted to thank everyone for joining in on this contest.

What looked like to be an easy task to make the Ultibot go out for a walk turned out to be a challenge for even our most expert users. I guess this means more acknowledgement and respect for the winner!

Perhaps the winner could share some tips on how he got his Ultibot to walk so consistent.

@Eraser set the bar amazingly high with his entry, but before the end of the contest there was a final offense from @HDMakerspace to steal the grand prize. Who would come out a winner?

As a team we watched all entries and we came to an agreement that even though we absolutely loved all the creativity and entries, there was one entry we could not stop watching.

The winner of this contest is...

 

@ERASER!

Congratulations on behalf of the entire team!!!

I will reach out to you in a personal message to get the shipping details aligned.

Enjoy your victorious Monday!

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@Eraser, I think the greatest thing your video has done is demonstrated how anyone with enough patience and some great imagination (and a very, very patient and supportive wife) can use the amazing technologies we have at our fingertips today to create such wonderful things. Your video is very slick, polished and suffused with whimsy. The solutions you created in order to get the result you wanted are breathtaking in their simplicity. Your dedication to completing this project is inspiring.

It was worth running this contest just to get such a marvellous result. Ultimaker could do no worse by pushing this video out to the interwebs, it simply is that good.

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