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nether-designs

0.6 and 0.8 nozzle for an enlarges Ultimaker

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Greetings all.

RightyO. to business.

If you enlarge the nozzle size up to 0.6mm or 0.8mm resolution goes down. In theory printing should speed up yes?

If this is true does that mean that that there are less layers being printed?

i ask because i would like to make a giant ultimaker.

however with a 0.4mm nozzle even on normal detail an item say 12" high would take a month to print. detail isn't a major concern for the projects and their size its more for the form and shape.

any advise?

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You can up your layer thickness to something like .25mm with a nozzle setup like that and not experience too many issues, though you will likely want to slow down your first layer so it has a chance to stick. Going with a .25mm layer thickness will theoretically cut your print time down 20% over a .2mm layer, down 60% over a .1mm layer. Adjusting nozzle size will not adjust layer thickness, you have to do so in the slicer. It will, however, allow for a greater amount of material to be extruded, thus your lines will be thicker. This can save you a little time, maybe one perimeter/loop per layer.

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You can up your layer thickness to something like .25mm with a nozzle setup like that and not experience too many issues, though you will likely want to slow down your first layer so it has a chance to stick. Going with a .25mm layer thickness will theoretically cut your print time down 20% over a .2mm layer, down 60% over a .1mm layer. Adjusting nozzle size will not adjust layer thickness, you have to do so in the slicer. It will, however, allow for a greater amount of material to be extruded, thus your lines will be thicker. This can save you a little time, maybe one perimeter/loop per layer.

Joris is running the UM XL at http://3dea.openhouse.me with an 0.8mm nozzle to print large vases and buckets (0.4mm layers, 1.2mm wide). I made him a 1.2mm nozzle, and when it's a bit more quiet, we'll switch it and test how much PLA we can squeeze out. we'll probably go for 0.5mm layers and 2mm wide extrusion, and see how fast it can go.

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I was waiting for a Joris update... I've been printing with a nozzle in that size range and .25 has been a good layer thickness as far as not having to switch up too many settings and still getting good layer adhesion and print speeds. Anything really larger than that would seem to begin delving into the realm of individualized setups, but I could be wrong. Maybe it's still easily tune-able at the larger layer thicknesses, I just was trying to give a frame of reference.

Which slicer are you using? You are really going to be wanting one that allows for you to edit the printing profile because the layer thickness is how you are going to save time. Most detail/normal settings are adjusting that value, but if you are using one that doesn't have a "rougher" setting than the normal, you are not going to notice any significant savings in time to print. Cura and KISSlicer (2 most popular slicers it seems right now) both allow you to manually set your layer thickness.

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Thanks guys! you've been so helpful

Joergen : i would love to know what you would charge for a .6 and a .8 and would love to find out how testing with a 1.2mm nozzle goes - other than 3dea , do you have any other blogs on the project? would be awesome to find out more!

i currently use cura have only just looked into Kisslice. i have a little way to go as i do have some issues with the files i've got and they need to be picked apart as it were..

Detail isn't a massive issue for me. Shape and form is though along with size too.

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Understand, just remember that the more material you are trying to lay down at one, the more you can be at the mercy of filament diameter change (and shrinkage). If you do need a precise size, time and time again, you may not want increase your layer thickness too much. Even in bumping up from a .1 layer to a .25 layer, I can notice a difference in shrinkage on a bridged section verses a walled section. By keeping the layer thin, you limit your shrinkage differences. Joris is not going to have any issues with that as he's doing vases/other single walled things, thus not having a bridged section sandwiched in between some walled sections. Depending upon your prints, you may, hence why I recommended starting at .25 mm for a layer thickness. Test it, then try thicker. Point being, if size is truly important, I would definitely not recommend jumping to .6 mm or .8 mm and assume that nothing is going to change from a .2 mm.

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a rough surface i can deal with.. a warped surface/warped shape isn't in my best interest.

I'll be sanding down all the parts i print anyway but thats certainly not something i have though of!

because of the items i'm going to be using as a base to build up on from its going to be neither here nor there over a larger scaled item. but certainly worth noting!.. i get alot of you guys are making small items and using them as the final product.

For my self this is more of a step to creating the dimensions and the shapes/forms. which will them be sanding smooth and any extra detail would be added.

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