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1.75 Filament with Ultimaker 2+

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No you cannot use 1.75mm filament in a printer designed for 2.85mm filament, it will simply fuck stuff up and cause you a lot of headaches. There is a whole bunch of threads on this forum with the same question.

It is possible to buy some new 3rd party parts made for 1.75mm and rebuild the printer to use exclusively 1.75mm filament, but that's not something I'd would reccomend if you do not have a very specific reason for doing it.

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I have not done this myself, but the 3D printing guys over at Adafruit.com have a tutorial for converting a UM2 to 1.75mm.

https://learn.adafruit.com/using-1-dot-75mm-filament-on-ultimaker-2/overview

I have no idea if it makes life easier or harder, but they seem to like it. I find it easier just to stick with 2.85mm. I have run into any limits on my filament choices, that's for sure! :)

Anyway, hope it helps. YMMV. Good luck.

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Adafruit doesn't convert to 1.75, they just use the standard um2 to use 1.75mm. That can work, but will never deliver as good print quality as a full hardware conversion. Also, um2+ extruder can't work with 1.75mm by default, due a 1.65mm standard gap on the extruder. Basically, it won't work as good as 2.85 without all the hardware adjustments.

Ofc if you just want to print boxes...

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Adafruit doesn't convert to 1.75, they just use the standard um2 to use 1.75mm. That can work, but will never deliver as good print quality as a full hardware conversion. Also, um2+ extruder can't work with 1.75mm by default, due a 1.65mm standard gap on the extruder. Basically, it won't work as good as 2.85 without all the hardware adjustments.

 

Oh! I did not know that. Thanks for the details! :)

 

Ofc if you just want to print boxes...

 

Heh, Noe and Pedro do seem to do a lot of that! :p

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Adafruit doesn't convert to 1.75, they just use the standard um2 to use 1.75mm. That can work, but will never deliver as good print quality as a full hardware conversion. Also, um2+ extruder can't work with 1.75mm by default, due a 1.65mm standard gap on the extruder. Basically, it won't work as good as 2.85 without all the hardware adjustments.

 

Oh! I did not know that.  Thanks for the details! :)

 

Ofc if you just want to print boxes...

 

Heh, Noe and Pedro do seem to do a lot of that! :p

 

Do you think i can use 3mm filament?

Also i was considering buying a UM2+ what are your thoughts on yours?

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90% of "3mm" filament is actually 2.85 or 2.9 +/- .05. But there are a few (very cheap chinese) suppliers that actually ship true 3mm filament which you can not use on an Ultimaker. Please post this kind of question in it's own topic as it is unrelated to 1.75mm.

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90% of "3mm" filament is actually 2.85 or 2.9 +/- .05.  But there are a few (very cheap chinese) suppliers that actually ship true 3mm filament which you can not use on an Ultimaker.  Please post this kind of question in it's own topic as it is unrelated to 1.75mm.

 

ok thanks, the filament i was looking at is 2.95 mm. And how do you like your UM2+?

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Also i was considering buying a UM2+ what are your thoughts on yours?

 

I love my Ultimaker 2(+)! There is nothing quite like taking the idea in your head and turning in to a real thing you can hold in your hand! ... Plus I get lots of cool and unique toys too. :D It is lots of learning and trial and error, though, so be prepared to sink some time in to it.

My only complaint with my printer is that my robot project got put on hold as I got distracted with the printer. That was more than a year ago! ;)

To keep this on topic, though, I have never had the urge to convert to 1.75mm and I have not trouble getting 2.85mm in Canada, both cheap stuff and quality name brand stuff. In the US or with having several different printers, maybe it makes more sense to convert, but for me, I do not see much point. Though maybe I do not know what I am missing! :p

Anyway, hope this helps.

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Also i was considering buying a UM2+ what are your thoughts on yours?

 

I love my Ultimaker 2(+)!  There is nothing quite like taking the idea in your head and turning in to a real thing you can hold in your hand! ... Plus I get lots of cool and unique toys too. :D It is lots of learning and trial and error, though, so be prepared to sink some time in to it.

My only complaint with my printer is that my robot project got put on hold as I got distracted with the printer.  That was more than a year ago! ;)

To keep this on topic, though, I have never had the urge to convert to 1.75mm and I have not trouble getting 2.85mm in Canada, both cheap stuff and quality name brand stuff.  In the US or with having several different printers, maybe it makes more sense to convert, but for me, I do not see much point.  Though maybe I do not know what I am missing! :p

Anyway, hope this helps.

 

ok thanks i probably will purchase one next year. And same with me i was making a guitar and then i started using my high school's 3-D printer and Solidworks and havent worked on the guitar. lol

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>ok thanks, the filament i was looking at is 2.95 mm. And how do you like your UM2+?

Well what printer do you have - you shouldn't hijack someone else's thread - I was assuming you were the original poster who has a UM but if you have some other brand printer maybe 2.95 is fine. It's fine to post on forums without owning an ultimaker but put that in your description and start a new post to avoid confusion. Anyway in any UM printer 2.95 is very very very close to causing massive clogs in the bowden/fails but might be okay. Measure that in 5 or 6 places a meter apart to see if it varies a lot. 3.001mm and it will get stuck in the bowden after being compressed in the feeder.

Non ultimaker printers are fine. I sell a larger diameter bowden if you are interested.

Actually the best test - next time it fails - remove the bowden at both ends and cut the filament at both ends (3cm from outside the bowden) and slide the filament through the bowden while U shaped and see how much friction it is. The feeder can push about 5kg of force but you want all that force going to the head and not wasted in the bowden.

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