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snowygrouch

extrusion amount depends on temperature

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I dont know what slicer you are using, so cannot comment on that side of things.

But I do know that 205 degrees is quite low for trying to print fast. The problem tends to be that

is doesnt matter what the extruder wheel does, if the hotend is too cold you cannot melt enough plastic

in time because the mass flow rate is faster. The hotend takes a while to heat up, and has only quite low

thermal mass (the metal bits are quite small) so you can only store so much heat energy there. When you try to pass plastic through, you remove heat energy from the hotend. If this gets fast enough, you can remove the heat faster than you can put it back. This means the plastic will not get fluid enough to squeeze through the tip quickly.

I suggest you increase your print temp at high speeds and try again.

C.

EDIT: Whoops looks like Joergen already pretty much answerd that in your other post. Nevermind.

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When you start using higher temperatures, you need a fan blowing between the aluminum plate and the bottom wood plate to prevent plugging on longer prints. I believe Snowygrouch has one on his personal web page you can download and print. See the link in his signature above.

not necessarily... the new V2 hot end severely limits the amount of energy that can heat the upper portions of the hot end. also, the big alu plate acts as a great heat sink, which doesn't need additional cooling. long prints at high temperatures (i.e. 30h at 260C) will not cause any troubles. letting the printer idle while hot for more than 30-60 minutes is more likely to cause problems.

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When you start using higher temperatures, you need a fan blowing between the aluminum plate and the bottom wood plate to prevent plugging on longer prints. I believe Snowygrouch has one on his personal web page you can download and print. See the link in his signature above.

not necessarily... the new V2 hot end severely limits the amount of energy that can heat the upper portions of the hot end. also, the big alu plate acts as a great heat sink, which doesn't need additional cooling. long prints at high temperatures (i.e. 30h at 260C) will not cause any troubles. letting the printer idle while hot for more than 30-60 minutes is more likely to cause problems.

On that I can tell a bit more. I have a V2 hotend in my TITAN machine, which has no alu plate but a wood plate instead. And a tiny gap between that wooden plate and a PLA printed part on top of that. I've printed at 210C without any issue on it. I wouldn't dare taking it to 260C, but I think it shows how well the Peek and the airgap work for cooling.

Like this:

http://daid.eu/~daid/IMG_20130112_225156.small.jpg

(The black on top of the wood is PLA)

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When you start using higher temperatures, you need a fan blowing between the aluminum plate and the bottom wood plate to prevent plugging on longer prints. I believe Snowygrouch has one on his personal web page you can download and print. See the link in his signature above.

not necessarily... the new V2 hot end severely limits the amount of energy that can heat the upper portions of the hot end. also, the big alu plate acts as a great heat sink, which doesn't need additional cooling. long prints at high temperatures (i.e. 30h at 260C) will not cause any troubles. letting the printer idle while hot for more than 30-60 minutes is more likely to cause problems.

I have the new hotend. Before I added the fan for the aluminum heat sink, I got plugs nearly every day at 225-230c. Since adding the fan, I haven't had a plug, period. So, in my case, it made a huge difference. In fact, I only have the fan on the heat sink now. I took off the other one. When I stopped using that one, my prints stopped warping. Since I mounted the heat sink fan on the right side, I could still put the other fan back on the left, if I needed it later for dual extrusion or whatever. I actually created my own heat sink fan, even though the one snowygrouch has is great.

If an alternative to Thingiverse ever appears, I'll upload a bunch of my own designs. I'm not putting them on Thingiverse though. They've ruined that site by claiming ownership of anything which gets uploaded.

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