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Ultimaker 2 E3D Upgrade Kit Review and How to

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I recently had the chance to upgrade my Ultimaker 2 to an E3D version that replaced the stock hotend and extruder with the E3D v6 all metal hotend and the Titan geared extruder. The installation was very straight forward, but it did take a couple of hours and some patience. I found Thomas Sanladerer’s guide and the E3D wiki to be very helpful while installing the upgrades. In addition, I also made a tutorial video on how to install the upgrade kit. (Links Below)

Link to Tom’s tutorial:

 

 

Link to E3D wiki:

http://wiki.e3d-online.com/wiki/E3D-v6_on_Ultimaker_2

I also made a how to video tutorial for the installation Link:

 

 

Before I purchased my Ultimaker 2 (UM2), I had been using a reprap with an E3D v6, and for me having the v6 was a big deal since nozzles were easy to swap, the v6  was able to push any material I threw at it, and it was able to reach high temps that allowed you to print materials like polycarbonate. Also, I also worked with many experimental filaments that I made with my Filastruder, and the v6 was always able to handle it. After purchasing the Ultimaker, things became more limited. While the print quality was impeccable, I missed the quick swap nozzles and ability to use many different materials with solid performance. With the UM2 before the upgrade I never had issues with ABS or PLA materials, but using more exotic filaments was an issue. The upgrade kit solved that problem for me. I got mine from Filastruder. The direct link is below.

If you are an Ultimaker 2 owner, you know that under-extrusion has always been an issue, and the Titan extruder solves that problem. The Titan extruder has a fully constrained filament path, so that means that performance while using flexible materials is vastly improved. For example, before I installed the upgrade, I was having issues with printing Taulman’s PCTPE filament (a flexible material), and now that I have the Titan, PCTPE flows through with no issues. Likewise, for the original materials like ABS and PLA, I am no longer dealing with skipped steps from a poorly designed extruder. Overall, the performance of the Titan versus the original extruder is significantly better. The Titan crushes the original in every way.

The new v6 hotend is also a huge improvement over Ultimakers hotend for several reasons. The first of which is the all metal construction of the v6. This allows the hotend to be heated up to 400°C. The original UM2 hotend had a max temp of 260°C, so this is a massive improvement that will allow you to print any high temp materials, like polycarbonate, Taulman’s Tritan, or even Ultem if you have a heated chamber. Another benefit is you can also change nozzle sizes. In addition, E3D also offers hardened nozzles for abrasive materials and the volcano nozzle for efficient printing of larger objects.

E3D also provides a sample of their edge filament with the kit. After I installed the upgrade, I did a test print and used the included sample of grey edge filament.

Here is a quick video on E3D’s edge filament:

Overall, I highly recommend the E3D upgrade kit for experienced users looking to increase the performance of their UM2. The installation itself takes some time, but should be a walk in the park for intermediate to advanced users. Performance wise, after the upgrade has been installed, I no longer have to deal with under extrusion or as much difficulty with printing flexible materials. Another great thing about E3D, is that there is a large online community that you can take advantage of. The cost of the upgrade kit is less than Ultimakers upgrade kit, and E3D’s upgrade kit has objectively better performance. You can purchase the upgrade kit from Filastruder here: https://www.filastruder.com/products/e3d-ultimaker-upgrade-kit

Edited by Guest

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Another benefit is you can also change nozzle sizes. In addition, E3D also offers hardened nozzles for abrasive materials and the volcano nozzle for efficient printing of larger objects.

Actually, the Olsson Block that is standard on the UM2+ and available as a upgrade for the UM2 is way easier to change nozzles on, and it can use any E3D Nozzle.

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WOW this reads like a E3D commercial .....

My short reaction, as before...

Unless you need real high temperatures the ED3V6 is a downgrade compared to the Olson block, as changing nozzles is a (IMHO) real pain in the @$$ compared to the Olson. Also the V6  (the 3mm bowden version) is not nice with PLA. If you want to try it... I still have a V6 laying around, you can have it for free if you want to try... I don't use it anymore (I used it dedicated for ABS, but I now have the UM3 for that)

Replacing the feeder is a good idea if you still have the old black feeder on the UM2. The titan can be a good option, I never tried it, the UM2 plus feeder is a good option  (you can buy it separately if you ask any UM reseller) And ofc there's the bondtech, so plenty options for good feeders.

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Using an Olsson block and a Matchless block for dual extrusion on an UM2+. Nozzle change is 20 sec and I can immediately continue printing, no X/Y/Z re-calibration needed.

Using E3D's V6 on a corexy printer. Nozzle change takes 2 min and requires additional pliers to hold the block. I've to re-calibrate X/Y/Z because the nozzle tip which is far apart from the mounting bracket will most likely have moved a few fractions of a millimeter.

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The whole point of the E3D upgrade kit has nothing to do with easy nozzle swapping. I 100% agree that if you are upgrading for the sake of nozzle swapping ease, then by all means get an Olsson block.

@ultiarjan I used an E3D for about 10 months previous to getting my UM2. I never had problems with PLA. Maybe you just got a defective unit? Also, if you still have that v6 for free yes I am interested please PM me, I will pay for shipping.

The point of an E3D upgrade kit is to be able to use higher temp materials (380C), gain access to E3D's volcano system (pretty big deal for fast large prints), and replace the awful original feeder on the Ultimaker 2. It's also almost half as much as the official upgrade kit (220 USD vs 395 USD), and provides a better deal for people that like to experiment, NOT for people who want the easiest user experience.

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E3D V6 is hands-down the better solution for the tinkerer that wants to run high-temperature filaments, no questions about that, and the Titan is a better feeder than the original UM2 feeder if you still use that.

If you want to replace the feeder and already have a Olsson Block, you can buy the Titan, motor and bowden coupling separately for 57,5£ and get the new TFM coupler and rigid spacer for about 15€ from your Ultimaker reseller, and print @Labern's fanshroud. That will take your feeder and hotend to similar performance to the UM2+ at a even lower price point ;)

There is no need to downgrade your hotend for regular PLA use in the process if you are not a tinkerer aiming to use high-temp polymers. (and yes, a lot of people have problems with all-metal hotends and PLA, try a search on google and you will find a lot of them.)

What i react against is E3D marketing it as a "best for everyone" kit, and using "easy to change nozzles" as a marketing thing, where in reality, i cannot even get how E3D still can supply hotends with such a crappy user experience in the area of changing nozzles.

Edited by Guest
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I'm going to argue that is not technically a PTFE liner, as it doesn't drop all the way into the heater block. E3D sells a hot end with a PTFE liner all the way down to the heater block, called the lite6.

The picture you reference does show an advantage of running E3D hardware, though. It's easy to switch between 1.75 mm filament and 3 mm filament, if you so desire. I printed a single benchy with the included 3 mm Ultimaker filament before switching my UMO+ to E3D hardware and have been running 1.75 mm filament ever since.

I haven't had any PLA problems with my E3D hardware, but that may be because I'm running 1.75 mm filament and it IS constructed differently than the 3 mm hot end.

 

And what really adds to the confusion, and possibly people claiming no issue at all with  PLA is E3D selling totally different hot ends all under the E3D-V6 name, (picture from E3D website) versions with and without PTFE liner.

E3Dv6types.thumb.png.70d24391babd2c384d053e293fc6ef21.png

 

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