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engr

Order sequence of parts in Cura & UM3

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I want to print a part using custom-made prime towers. Therefore, I want to print this sequence for each layer:

 

  1. Prime Tower 1 (with Material 1)
  2. Part (with Material 1)
  3. Prime Tower 2 (with Material 2)
  4. Part (with Material 2)

 

Using per-model-settings, I can easily set the material. However, Cura insists on printing Prime Tower 2 last.

I have tried different orders of loading parts. I have tried moving things around until I felt like Abbott & Costello with the shell game.

Is it possible to force this as I require?

I've searched the forum, but haven't find this exact question.

5a333a4b2267c_2017-05-0810_55_08-Cura.thumb.png.a078cc169e20d9f8e3aea225de4fb27c.png

5a333a4b2267c_2017-05-0810_55_08-Cura.thumb.png.a078cc169e20d9f8e3aea225de4fb27c.png

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Hi @ahoeben, ok I am confused. Surely what @engr wants is correct.  Why does Cura print material 1 and then material 2 without priming the 2nd nozzle - and then prime nozzle 2 when you are going to prime and print material 1 next?? It makes no sense to me.

Because what you call "priming" is not seen as priming by Cura. The 2 "custom prime towers" are not prime towers, but just regular objects. There is no way to tell Cura in what order objects must be printed.

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Have you tried printing your object without primetowers (with the latest version of Cura)? In most situations, that works really well (if you use the provided printing profiles, and use Ultimaker materials).

Not so with polycarbonate. And PVA cannot be applied to PC, although PC can be applied to PVA. Here's a pic of what happens with my custom tower of PC. If I don't prime a sacrificial part, then this hairy mess happens on my good part.

5a333afb9ee04_primetowerPC.png.dc6ddda1938fb13ca91a97369e01fe41.png

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Hi @ahoeben, ok I am confused. Surely what @engr wants is correct.  Why does Cura print material 1 and then material 2 without priming the 2nd nozzle - and then prime nozzle 2 when you are going to prime and print material 1 next?? It makes no sense to me.

Because what you call "priming" is not seen as priming by Cura. The 2 "custom prime towers" are not prime towers, but just regular objects. There is no way to tell Cura in what order objects must be printed.

@tomnagel is correct. And I want to use two custom prime towers in order to prime both nozzles but keep the material separate. The Cura-generated prime tower uses the same tower to prime both nozzles.

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Hi @ahoeben, ok I am confused. Surely what @engr wants is correct.  Why does Cura print material 1 and then material 2 without priming the 2nd nozzle - and then prime nozzle 2 when you are going to prime and print material 1 next?? It makes no sense to me.

Because what you call "priming" is not seen as priming by Cura. The 2 "custom prime towers" are not prime towers, but just regular objects. There is no way to tell Cura in what order objects must be printed.

Silly me, I assume my brain did not register the word "custom" when I read it

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I have not had that happen with my PC prints. Are you printing more than one object with PC at one time?

 

In this specific case, no, but usually yes. What do you mean by "that"... do you mean the prime tower isn't hairy like in the photo?

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I have not had that happen with my PC prints. Are you printing more than one object with PC at one time?

 

In this specific case, no, but usually yes.  What do you mean by "that"... do you mean the prime tower isn't hairy like in the photo?

 

Any hairiness at all. With PC, I have experimented with Supports, but my main prints have been done without supports and therefore no priming tower.

When I do use priming towers, there is some gook around it as it is there to wipe off the crap before printing.

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