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nicolelaure

Fisher Price Explorer Wheels

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Hi all,

I previously found this post but it has gone stale and nobody on the list has come back to my messages. Starting a new one to see if I can get traction :).

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/3184-who-can-print-6-fisher-price-explorer-wheels-for-me?page=2

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IMG-20170608-WA0023.thumb.jpg.caabcb9118aa819d57e6d63f96b49b43.jpg

I too am looking for the CAD files to print 6 new wheels for my Fisher Price Explorer. Really hoping that somebody can please help me with this. I live in London.

1. Can somebody create the CAD files for me, I cannot get them from the previous person

2. How did they manage to get he wheels off

3. Pushing the boat out for a new steering wheel too if somebody can help with that

4. Do you think 6 new wheels will hold the weight of a child?

Thank you so much in advance, I really appreciate it.

Nicole

sml_gallery_10836_77_43489.jpg.2bfa2a7ba66c62e444eefda638d6798e.jpg

IMG-20170608-WA0024.thumb.jpg.35c50294fd8f749ebe2e368d9d4842ab.jpg

IMG-20170608-WA0023.thumb.jpg.caabcb9118aa819d57e6d63f96b49b43.jpg

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It would also be best to provide a sample wheel for whoever will model the part to measure. For that you will have to remove the wheel, which I bet will not be easy since they would be designed to be be very secure to keep small children safe.

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I don't know the size of this car. But if it would be rather large, it might be cheaper, easier and safer to buy a completely new toy?

It might take days to get a few wheels 3D-printed, and cost a lot in shipping. And they are likely to be less strong than injection moulded wheels.

To estimate the costs, you could have a look at pricing at specialised 3D-printing services, like Shapeways (UK), Materialise (Leuven, Belgium), or 3D-hubs. They give quotes based on dimensions, material, size and volume. I guess you should expect a few hundred euro?

Another solution, which you can easily do yourself, is remove one wheel, make a silicone mould of it, and cast it in flexible polyurethane. There are a lot of very good tutorial videos on mould making and casting on Youtube, including all required material specs, etc. This would probably be the cheapest option if you want to keep this old toy. And it would be the most educative.

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Im going to go ahead and assume this toy has sentimental value of some sort? Otherwise I agree with @geert_2, It wouldn't be worth it (and Im all for fixing broken stuff, second hand, etc.)

It looks to me like the pins holding the wheels in the first picture yoou posted, were removed (possibly cut or drilled out?) and replaced with something shiny (like a crew or bolt?)

Like that picture also illustrates, printing replacement wheels is definitely doable... The steering wheel is somewhat larger, and more complex, still doable... But again, is it worth the effort?

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