Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
luizzanotello

4mm Thick "Wall" Print keeps failing

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

I have made three consecutive tries printing the attached file with black ABS (2.85) in an Ultimaker 2 Extended, and I keep running with an error exactly at the same point of the print every time (you can check the failed print bellow too).

FILE / Cura configuration:

http://imgur.com/a/ggzOI

Failed print:

http://imgur.com/a/kHB13

I have printed the same file with PLA (of course with a few different configurations) and it worked fine.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

Best,

Luiz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's just basic underextrusion. I would try printing either a little slower or a little hotter. I can see underextrusion in that wall and also underextrusion near the top and then it basically stops extruding at all and makes a stringy mess.

I'm not sure what is causing your underextrusion - there are so many possible causes but I'd start with speed and temp. Especially temperature. What temperature did you use? I usually go for around 245C. Once I clogged a nozzle because I printed too hot (254C that time - yes exactly 254) and I let it sit a little too long in the nozzle (a minute?) at that temp and it baked into a gummy mess. I was able to get it out by heating the nozzle alone over a gas flame to about 200C and removing with a toothpick.

ABS has a much narrower temperature range than PLA. PLA is pretty good from 180C to 240C.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's just basic underextrusion.  I would try printing either a little slower or a little hotter.  I can see underextrusion in that wall and also underextrusion near the top and then it basically stops extruding at all and makes a stringy mess.

I'm not sure what is causing your underextrusion - there are so many possible causes but I'd start with speed and temp.  Especially temperature.  What temperature did you use?  I usually go for around 245C.  Once I clogged a nozzle because I printed too hot (254C that time - yes exactly 254) and I let it sit a little too long in the nozzle (a minute?) at that temp and it baked into a gummy mess.  I was able to get it out by heating the nozzle alone over a gas flame to about 200C and removing with a toothpick.

ABS has a much narrower temperature range than PLA.   PLA is pretty good from 180C to 240C.

Thank you! I will try that out. I thought it was weird for it to be only an under extrusion problem, since all the other parts worked fine (and it literally always fails at the same place). I was wondering wether it had something to do with the new algorithms for generating the gcode from Cura (since I have never run into such problems around a year ago, with a deprecated version of the software).

I have printed it at 240C (for this specific ABS the specs said from 230 to 245C). I will try raising it to 245C and lowering a bit the speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah - you didn't mention about the firmware. Cura 2.* does some weird things with print speed. Consider making all the speeds the same. I don't think this is the issue but other less critical surface ugliness I've seen caused by speed changes. Again I don't think this is your specific problem but definitely have a look at *all* the print speeds in cura 2.*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • Taking Advantage of DfAM
      This is a statement that’s often made about AM/3DP. I'll focus on the way DfAM can take advantage of some of the unique capabilities that AM and 3DP have to offer. I personally think that the use of AM/3DP for light-weighting is one of it’s most exciting possibilities and one that could play a key part in the sustainability of design and manufacturing in the future.
        • Like
      • 3 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!