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SandervG

Introductions | Team Ultimaker

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Outside of the great help you can get from our user experts, there is a fair chance either me or one of my colleagues reaches out with a helping hand as well. We all like to get involved and there is a lot we can all learn from each other. How can you recognize these fortunate people that pop up with their fancy titles?

Outside of the seemingly infinite knowledge, you can recognize Ultimaker people by the 'Team Ultimaker' title under their user name.

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In this post, I would like to invite my colleagues to introduce themselves and write a few words about their expertise. And in the end, we all get to know each other a little bit better :)

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I'll start with introducing myself, perhaps that would set the proper example ;)I'm Sander van Geelen, the community manager at Ultimaker.

Basically, it means I look after you guys. I try to make this a healthy, fun and growing environment where you can even learn something on occasion. You should be able to learn everything about Ultimaker in our community of experts!

So if you have any questions or feedback, make sure to reach out to me. You can either tag me (@username) or send me a DM.

For Ultimaker I also design our booths for the shows we go to.

I've worked for Ultimaker for 5 years now, from back in the days where we shipped a dozen of Ultimaker Originals per week. Laser cutting the frames and making the drive bolts ourselves. It was an awesome time, times have definitely changed, but Ultimaker has always remained to be awesome!

mmmm.. I know things! For example.. 3D printing, and will probably be able to help troubleshoot Ultimaker Original's and Ultimaker 2(+)'s.

On a more personal note, I have a background in illustrating so in my spare time, I still like to draw.

And I like gif's.

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Hi, everyone! I'm Elisa, the social media specialist at Ultimaker, which basically means that I'm the person behind most posts on the Ultimaker channels, and also the one replying to your comments and messages there -with the support of our fantastic community manager!

I'm pretty new to Ultimaker and still learning loads every day about how everything works around here, so feedback is more than welcome.

Following Sander's example, on a more personal note, I can tell you that I'm Spanish and currently living in Amsterdam. I am a journalist -even if my career path has taken different routes- and enjoy writing and, especially, having endless discussions about the most random topics :)

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My name is Ruben, I'm a 26 year old software developer working at Cura. I've been at Ultimaker for 3 years. My day-to-day task consists of processing bug reports, fixing bugs and developing new features for Cura. I like to think of myself as the one guy that knows about all components of Cura: Front-end, back-end, translations, profiles, etc. Basically being very broad. Nowadays I'm not the only one any more that knows both front-end and back-end, but I'm still quite knowledgable about Cura and the go-to guy for a lot of colleagues.

I'm quite an idealist when it comes to open source software, and a champion of keeping Cura open. So I'm doing the best I can to keep the process open, keep Cura usable for the whole of the 3D printing community, and involve the community. The other influence I try to exert on Cura is to make it more stable (as opposed to featuritis) through automating tests and taking care of bug fixes.

Aside from work I like to play bass guitar, write subtitles for films and of course to program. I'm afraid no music of mine has been published on the internet, but you can see my subtitles online and of course my hobby programming projects, though I'm afraid that I tend to not finish most of those.

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Hello, I'm Marco and am 45 years. I started at Ultimaker in December 2015, so almost 2 years already, as a senior software engineer.

At this moment I'm one of the DevOps working on the Firmware of the UM3 and to improve all aspects (software, procedures, little bit hardware ) that come with it. And I'm learning more every day!

Having an interest in electronics (automating trains H0, Domotica), gaming (MMOs mostly), listening to music (trying to make some with an electrical guitar), watching movies / reading books (mostly sf) and naturally programming keeps me a busy bee.

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Hi, I'm BagelOrb a.k.a. the engine guy a.k.a. Tim a.k.a. that dude with the beard which is better than that of SandervG.

I work on the inner workings of the slicing engine which actually generates the gcode from the 3D model data. This requires a lot of knowledge of both hardware and firmware and of course of Cura itself.

In the next couple of years I will be researching slicing advanced geometry which goes beyond the scope of an STL: texture information, infill density heatmaps and similar 3-dimensionally defined data which cannot be captured in a surface mesh alone.

In my free time I like turtles.

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My name is Jaime, 27 years old. I currently work as a software developer for Cura, but have worked on Embedded (UM3 Firmware) and the UltiScanTastic®™, a structured light 3D scanner. I've started working for Ultimaker 5 years ago, which makes me the second software developer to be hired by UM (Daid being the first).

I "suffer" from the same problem as Ruben; If you're with a company like Ultimaker for an extended period of time, you tend to become the generic problem solver. I'm usually involved in a lot of projects at a time, ranging from Intellectual property to in depth software engineering.

As for hobbies; I play a lot of RPGS (Tabletop & LARP), which also includes a lot of crafting. I build my own costumes (cloth & leatherwork) and assorted props (I even made a fortune telling "haunted" robot).

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My name is Jaime, 27 years old. I currently work as a software developer for Cura, but have worked on Embedded (UM3 Firmware) and the UltiScanTastic®™, a structured light 3D scanner. I've started working for Ultimaker 5 years ago, which makes me the second software developer to be hired by UM (Daid being the first).

I "suffer" from the same problem as Ruben; If you're with a company like Ultimaker for an extended period of time, you tend to become the generic problem solver. I'm usually involved in a lot of projects at a time, ranging from Intellectual property to in depth software engineering.

As for hobbies; I play a lot of RPGS (Tabletop & LARP), which also includes a lot of crafting. I build my own costumes (cloth & leatherwork) and assorted props (I even made a fortune telling "haunted" robot).

So Jaime, tell us, where does the Nallath moniker come from?

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You can't just mention that, and not tell more... I am still disappointed I didn't get to see it in action.

Yeah, i should say a bit more about that. So the scanner project started of as my graduation project. In total I spent almost 2.5 years on this. The project got as far as a zero series (25 prototype units) before it got put in the fridge. The idea was to have a structured light 3D scanner in the same spirit as the UMO; A kit that you have to assemble yourself with lasercut plywood and 3D printed parts. It was estimated to be around 2000 euro and would have a rotation table. The first upgrade kit for it also got some work done, as this was Ruben's graduation thesis. The frontend software is also based on Uranium (which is also why the split between Uranium & Cura exists in the first place).

We're still trying to finish the project in our own time, but it's hard; After 40 hours a week, those 3-4 hours we can put in it without getting a burnout, isn't setting a great pace. Uranium is a whole lot more stable these days, so it's speeding up a bit, but not as fast as I would like. I'd love to find someone that can properly "adopt" the project so it can be finished. Seems like such a shame to not do anything with it (I do understand why UM shelved it, as we had & have bigger issues to solve with our "main" products).

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