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Jeff123

Minimum volume for adding infill?

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Hi all. I'm planning to print a short, flat disc. 3mm high, 6 inches or so in diameter. I've read a lot about warping, but most of the articles discuss long, flat parts. I'm wondering if I won't have as much trouble because my part has a circular perimeter. It will have a large surface in contact with the build plate, which I know can be an issue.

Can I even add infill to such a thin component? If so, is there a benefit to printing with, say, a waffle or honeycomb infill? Both of those designs seem like they could limit flex/curling along my horizontal plane.

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The shorter, the easier (so 3mm isn't too bad). Rounder is easier as well. And the less infill the better for warping.

I guess the main thing is that the bottom layer squishes well into the glass but here's everything you ever wanted to know to get your parts to never ever warp off the glass:

 

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Hiya,

you'll find that if the material is susceptible to warping that the thicker the part the worse the issue becomes.

it's like a tug of war. on one side there is the adhesion to the bed and on the other side is the shrinking of the layers. the more layers the more pull is created. with that in mind you can add direction of the pulling force. if you have a a straight wall then then you will find that the pulling direction is strongest along the length of the wall.

longer the wall, the more pull is created that way.

understanding that you then should be able to appreciate that discs/circles fair a lot better. add some brim and you shouldn't have any dramas.

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