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kmanstudios

136 hour print in progress

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11 minutes ago, mike-truly said:

Very nice.

 

Don't keep us in suspenders!  Hurry up!... (and wait).

 

(I wish I had 2 Ultimakers!).

 

LOL....I have to admit that I am getting a bit anxious to see it myself. So, close.......so close..... LOL

 

The first pic will be it all printed with support out the wazoo. I have no idea how long it will take to sa.....sumbitch!!

 

For some reason I just had a power failure that hit both machines at the same time. Even though on a UPS, it was severe enough to kill the job. 135 hours into the job......:'(

 

There is not an emoticon that expresses my frustration.

 

Here is where it died......GGGRRRRrrrrrrr

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Am going to try to priont missing pieces and then put them together.

 

But, seriously Team-UM...this is why we need a way to recover. Anything can go nuts. Fortunately I am an experienced model builder who has kitbashed many models, but this is very frustrating as I cannot do that with the other print that was an 11.5 hour print and died at 35 minutes to go.

 

:(:(:(:(

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Bummer indeed... sorry to hear that.

 

Very nice looking print there though!  It will look fine when you splice it together.

 

Hadn't really thought about the power outage issue as I haven't had that happen yet to a print.  Was your UPS not able to keep the printer going or was the UM so sensitive to the spike that it killed the print?  I've got a big UPS but don't currently have the UM2+ plugged into that... will rectify that when(if) my current print finishes.

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It is entirely possible that the battery inside has reached or passed its life expectancy. The surge suppressors worked fine. But I do not think it was the Printers as the UPS is supposed to condition the power as if comes out of the unit into a clean sine wave.

 

But, it is about 15 or more years old, and I am sure that plays a part.

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I'm so sorry about the power failure. Some other brands of 3D printer will automatically resume printing after a power failure. Perhaps Ultimaker could add that capability. I hope you can complete it. I'm looking forward to seeing it.

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1 hour ago, kmanstudios said:

It is entirely possible that the battery inside has reached or passed its life expectancy. The surge suppressors worked fine. But I do not think it was the Printers as the UPS is supposed to condition the power as if comes out of the unit into a clean sine wave.

 

But, it is about 15 or more years old, and I am sure that plays a part.

Then you can be sure the batteries are dead... Usually these are lead-acid batteries, similar to those in a car. Except that they are usually of a sealed gell-type that does not need refill, instead of the liquid types in the car. At least, as far as I have seen (I had an UPS for a server). In a car the batteries usually live 6 to 8 years. But near the end they lose capacity anyway, like all rechargable batteries. So you should replace them at least about every 5 years. It is a good idea to regularly test them, every six months or so: switch off the power (pull the plug) and look how long they provide power under realistic load conditions. Write down the survival time and load conditions, so you can exactly repeat the test. Near the end of life, time will go down very fast. Then they basically provide only protection against spikes and too high or too low voltages.

 

But even with UPS, spikes could still kill a print. I have had that in winter last year, when the air was so dry that I would cause huge "lightning- sparks" whenever I touched anything, sometimes up to 3 cm. So I had painfull arms all day.  :)  When touching the UM2 frame, and causing a spark, it would lock up. Sometimes it would continue printing, but I could no longer use the buttons, sometimes it stopped.

 

Yes, and I agree: a faillure-recovery would be a good thing. With the ability to continue on the same print, if the outage was not too long (so things didn't cool down and the model didn't come off), or the ability to print only the remaining part in a new print. Selectable per your preferences.

 

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@geert_2 thanks for the further insight. And, I agree on the way you put it about the print recovery. I think I just need to get a new UPS. I want to run my two machines off it. 1500W should do, yes? Oh yeah...ouchies on the shockies....oof!

 

@cloakfiend I know whatcha mean. I was building a model of the U.S.S. Constitution that required all the knots in the rigging to be tied by tweezers.Yes, tweezers......sigh.....had more than one or two mishaps on that one with all the spindly parts poking out and grabbing on shirt sleeves and such....... |And yeah, I am going to show you just what I mean.....ain't 3D printing, but it is a lot of patience ;)

DSC00129.thumb.jpg.fd3745265c81f71daf28b8f9b44e6673.jpg

DSC00141.thumb.jpg.27c342da3ca052761a285dcfef807993.jpgDSC00110.thumb.jpg.10c972a96b09a3522abd5e44b60de679.jpg

 

So, yeah, I do feel your pain. But, I do have good news and bad news.

 

The good news is I did get the very last printed by way of finding the spot to print from in Cura and then reslicing just that area. Came out with a very, very nice match for the surfaces to glue to each other.

 

The bad news is that it will probably take at least another 24 hours to get all the PVA out of the nooks and crannies and washed off for finishing. Fortunately, at 0.1mm, it is a very clean surface to start with and very little squidgies to x-acto off. I am so glas I found out how to print without the priming tower and still get a decent print. :)

 

@JimT, yeah, I know about other printers and their ability to recover and start back at the point of failure. That is why I am hoping it is on the horizon for UM.

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Dad is the GT grad...I will be starting college this fall here in Brooklyn City tech. Going into Computer Engineering Technology and such with robotics and all. Will be doing what amounts to a minor in physics.

 

And, thanks for the kind words on the Constitution.....that thing was tough. And I went nuts detailing everything on it.

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12 hours ago, kmanstudios said:

DSC00141.thumb.jpg.27c342da3ca052761a285dcfef807993.jpg

...

The bad news is that it will probably take at least another 24 hours to get all the PVA out of the nooks and crannies and washed off for finishing.

 

...

I have wondered if washing off the PVA would go faster if you use an aquarium with good temperature control (~35...40°C), and a powerfull circulation pump? That should remove PVA-saturated water from the model. The only risk is that the pump would get clogged by chunks of PVA, so the entry should be located carefully, and maybe protected with a big sift, like a big kitchen sift? Such a setup uses standard components and doesn't cost too much, compared to 3D-printing equipment.

 

Beautiful ship by the way.

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2 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

I have wondered if washing off the PVA would go faster if you use an aquarium with good temperature control (~35...40°C), and a powerfull circulation pump? That should remove PVA-saturated water from the model. The only risk is that the pump would get clogged by chunks of PVA, so the entry should be located carefully, and maybe protected with a big sift, like a big kitchen sift? Such a setup uses standard components and doesn't cost too much, compared to 3D-printing equipment.

 

I have used a small 12V pump that just circulated the water, and manually kept it with warm water circulating. It does make some difference, but not as great as I'd hoped. The main issue is parts floating, or air pockets as these areas never dissolve, or else parts going gooey and sticking to the walls or lid. Also parts like to end up in the dead areas out of the main flow, and once thats the case the dissolving isn't much faster than normal still water.  

 

The pump getting clogged hasn't been an issue, although I did wonder before. The suction from a pump isn't massive, I put the intake nearly on the bottom so theres not space for a large clump to be pulled through. You could always put a basic filter on the end, fish pond pumps must have this?  

 

Now I am just resigned to removing as much as possible by hand, and then leave overnight in water. Else im testing the new breakaway material, which can be more suitable in a lot of cases. 

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I just basically keep going back to it and picking at the parts with a clay tool or dental pick or even an airbrush needle to get into fine places. At a certain point, I will put a bit of dish washing soap in the water just to really help it get into small cavities and then a final rinsing to remove all the gunk off the surface. Learned to do that with traditional models. And, a @Oj00 said, part of the problem is when it comes to areas that just do not get moist, so I turn it a bit too. Besides, in me teeny Brooklyn Apartment, I am already pushing the space limitations.

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13 hours ago, kmanstudios said:

@geert_2 thanks for the further insight. And, I agree on the way you put it about the print recovery. I think I just need to get a new UPS. I want to run my two machines off it. 1500W should do, yes? Oh yeah...ouchies on the shockies....oof!

...

In some UPS you can easily replace the batteries, just like in your car. Might be worth checking out if you can borrow some for testing. But in my UPS 15 years ago, that didn't work well: they would not fully recharge, probably due to a little bit different voltages, even if only a few tenths of a volt? There could of course be other problems too in the UPS, such as damaged capacitors and worn-out electronics.

 

I do not know the official formula to calculate required UPS-capacity, but based on common sense, I would follow this logic, less or more: count the total power consumption of equipment to protect, in Watt. Define the time it has to survive a power-outage in hours. Multiply this by a factor 3 to account for inductive loads (power factor), battery wear after a couple of years, occasional power surges in the load (like when switching on something), and some safety margin. That should give you a rough idea. And then you might get shocked by the required capacity, size and cost, and lower your standards a bit...  :)

 

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So, here we are: It is printed and glued together:

Pieces before gluing.

01.thumb.jpg.a2425737c196600c50a0ecc96bfd8d34.jpg

Glued:

01A.thumb.jpg.19c9b67e8c0b96073ffc98ded28bd3d0.jpg

The rest are with a bit of primer on to (A) show flaws a bit better than the raw filament print and (B) prep the surface for the final sanding and painting. The first image shows the slight deviation of the two parts that came together. Will be easy to patch.

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That weird yellow spot is the piece that it is sitting on so the runners can dry without sticking to a surface. It is not part of the model.

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Thanks y'all :) I will be printing one of the companion pieces to it today. I have actually printed two versions and did not like the way it actually looked once real and in hand. I also made a piece or two too flimsy so, waiting for the other one to print tonight.

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Here is the first of the critters that I have made that I like. It has been printed a time or two and then changed for a variety of reasons. This was printed using the standard 0.4 AA core. But I told the line width to be 0.26mm. That is the minimum before you get warning colors. Layer height is 0.1mm. |I did not do much to the settings beyond that. Cura seemed to understand the relevant changes and adapted the other parts in the settings tab to compensate. Default temp, default speeds, etc. The only things I changed were the support settings and infill. Printed in Colorfabb Shining Silver and used the basic PLA settings to start with and only made the adjustments mentioned. Took a while to print and have more to print (More of the same critter with minor variations). This will probably be the last update until I finish with it as it is a full concept piece and until it is finished, I would like to keep it under wraps. It is a silly concept, but I like it. Kinda like it needs to be complete from this point on to make sense......well, as much as it ever will.

Critter_01.thumb.jpg.46087d55300ef15935385fa4d7dd26f2.jpg

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Critter_05.thumb.jpg.b226baa429df2d24759a8f136a67559a.jpg

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