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ilactro7

Conductive filament

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I'm using UM2 extended+

I need ESD filament for my printer. Can anyone pls suggest me which material to be used (PC or Abs) and where to buy. 

 

Also pls clarify me that can I use 1.75mm dia role? Why there are 2 sizes 1.75mm and 2.85mm?

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If you want your parts to discharge static to reduce ESD then you want it only slightly conductive.  If it's too conductive then when the part touches the electronics you can get a spark which is bad.  Something like 10mb from one side of the part to the other is a good resistance.  For example if someone's hand is touching one side and the electronics is touching the other side - that would be good.

 

I had heard of conductive filament before but I had never heard of ESD filament before but I just googled it and I see there are some suppliers.  It's a bit expensive.

 

ABS is going to be almost impossible to print.  ABS is already difficult but when you add lots of conductive fill to it then it will be even worse.  You will need to enclose the printer and get the air temp up to at least 35C or parts will come right off the bed.

 

PLA is much better but will melt at temperatures around 55C so if this will be a product that will be in an automobile and left in the hot sun in summer then that's bad.  PLA can withstand any temperature humans can withstand but people leave things in places that can get very hot.  Like the inside of a computer maybe?

 

The UM2 uses "3mm" filament which is typically actually 2.85mm (which is good as 3mm is a little too big for a UM2).  If you buy 1.75mm filament you will need to get a conversion kit from 3dsolex or at the very minimum you might get by with just getting a "1.75 TFT" from 3dsolex.  I strongly advise you stick with normal 3mm filament.

 

There are two different common filament sizes.  Fortunately only 2 sizes.  Some printers use 1.75mm and some use 2.85mm filament.

 

Older discussion here:

 

 

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Colorfabb's Ngen is very similar and as easy to print as PLA and has a higher melt temperature - 15 degrees or so? I cannot remember; 245 temp is a good starting point, go much lower and layer adhesion may be a problem - of course all depends on other settings too.

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