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Stefania Dinea

THE ARCHITECTURE OF 3D PRINTING - 02 MASSING

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MASSING

Massing is the easiest thing to control in Revit in regards to 3D print, and the most fun to play with. As also demonstrated in the topography when a massing is present the only thing you have to think about is to keep a minimum thickness of 2 mm (in scale) for best results, other than that, volume study and fast prototyping is the game you play in this setting.

When you want to produce a one piece model, you don't have to worry about being able to extract the mass out of the site, they can be one piece, however that is another modeling option we will discuss in the next chapter: TOLERANCES AND SNUG FITT

 

image.png.e20893e6479f8f7e9a0ed5d4428a2c3c.png 

 

 

For cutting and controlling the volume you can use void forms instead of solid. Like in the example below.

 

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image.png.e76164dbd4e92c6982bdee8e2c6a4f84.png

 

So, for our tests we will run the following 4 alternatives based on the same plan layout.

 

Alternative 1

image.png.b46c10b25691d47f3f0e45e2757e04c3.png

Alternative 2

 

image.png.c67efe202a778f8f356efc1200db33a9.png

Alternative 3

image.png.0fff51ff29b2fe65421530ffd0d55780.png

Alternative 4

 

image.png.f4a69ad38cd2a7d77cfa119d6125964f.png

 

3D PRINTED RESULT:

!!!Downloadable files below!!!

image.png.c942c011f60b780fe4151640cbbbd413.png

 

You can print them together with the topography or separately. And the best part of 3D printed parts is that you can draw on it. 

 

29196261_10155253874467327_7184761931452907520_o.thumb.jpg.dfe8b1985d18294aae351286fe91b4f5.jpg

29196367_10155253874097327_4101767963240038400_o.thumb.jpg.96359bf4841d81bdb273c999701c487e.jpg

DSC04647.thumb.JPG.e1464652373f51c792b4448d4970e54c.JPG

 

Next time: 

THE ARCHITECTURE OF 3D PRINTING - 03 TOLERANCES AND SNUG FIT

 

image.png.ec81673ab643a72ac9fe8b9f8b668500.png

 

 

PREVIOUS POST:

THE ARCHITECTURE OF 3D PRINTING - 01 TOPOGRAPHY

 

alternativ 4-1.stl

alternativ 3-1.stl

alternativ 2-1.stl

alternativ 1-1.stl

 

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Edited by Stefania Dinea
missed some info
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Interesting plastic rendering..    But what size is that "model' Presumably it's at best A4 size unless you have a serious printer on hand.

Small models like that can often be hand crafted in the same or less time than printing would require  As these are throwaways or at best, V limited half life discussion objects.

  Precision is largely irrelevant given the purpose and intent of the things.

Been An architect for 35 yrs   I've seen experienced the race to the digital  age. Some has been great some... some much less than great :-)

 Like 'actors' ..architects are V easily pigeonholed early on .. Choose wisely 

Edited by danilo

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Hi @danilo, thank you for your 2 cents! I don't think the model above is meant as a benchmark model to show the general benefits of 3D printing in architecture, but just an example that illustrates how to control massing in Revit > Cura. I'm not saying 3D printing is the holy grail and the answer to everything, but it definitely can hold a lot of benefits for a firm willing to adopt it. 

 

Do you have any examples of highly anticipated technology that you saw pass by, that didn't make? Could be interesting!

 

Looking forward hearing from you,

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On 4/6/2018 at 7:52 AM, danilo said:

Interesting plastic rendering..    But what size is that "model' Presumably it's at best A4 size unless you have a serious printer on hand.

 

Hej @danilo - the model is 17x17 cm - and I am curious - what is a serious printer? a 3D systems printer has a 250 x 250 x 330 mm buildplate, an UM3 extended 200x200x300 - I seriously don't see the huge difference, except in the cost of the machine and materials. 

 

Quote

Small models like that can often be hand crafted in the same or less time than printing would require  As these are throwaways or at best, V limited half life discussion objects.

Study models are throwaway models, this model costs about 10 Euro in material (a laser cutter acryl sheet is about 50 euro), I will not go into the advantages of using just the amount of material you need, the toxicity of foam cutters, or the sustainability aspect of 3D printing, including in time management. While you spend those lovely hours handcrafting your volume, people like me continue working on their design. @SandervG may not be saying it, but I am, 3D printing is the holy grail in terms of model making in architecture - I for one do not miss those late nights putting together models for presentations, the smoke of foam cutters, the extra work turning a 3D model into a 2D lines for laser cutting, the lovely blade of cutters after a very long and exhausting day, the opportunity to cut off your finger in the wood shop and all those lovely downsides that nobody talks about in our industry. Now, even on a deadline, I leave the printers working and go home to have a good night sleep and can count that the machines did their job in the morning when I have to deliver.

 

Precision is largely irrelevant given the purpose and intent of the things.

Highly disagree - precision is very important, specially in our business and the digital age has made the new generation forget about the important of tolerances.  

 

Been An architect for 35 yrs   I've seen experienced the race to the digital  age. Some has been great some... some much less than great :-)

??? I am more interested in how you have contributed as a senior architect to the education of the new generation? Because from this post all I can see the condescending tone specific to our industry. 

 

 Like 'actors' ..architects are V easily pigeonholed early on .. Choose wisely 

I have chose to share my knowledge with this community, and deal with comments like this that add no actual value to the thing I am trying to achieve - and that is explain the 3D printing process from concept to technical design, how to deal with revit models and what are things one should consider when wanting to start with this process. I am using an ultimaker printer, and cura, hence the Ultimaker community. By every post, the models will increase in complexity. I think it is very bad, that we as architects have no where to turn to when it comes to architecture specific models. If you want to be useful,  I will be looking forward to reading suggestions of topics I should cover or things that have not worked for you. 

 

Regards,

//Stefania

 

Edited by Stefania Dinea
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 Clearly you 'have purpose' Good for you ..  distributing  Techno skills to any who will listen.

  Great!  Many will inhale the knowledge. 

'Architecture' is imo only the vehicle  here.

 

A 17 by 17 cm  Study model isn't worth the trouble to be Blunt ..No designer needs such a visual aid.. certainly as a miniature.

Size  of the plastic 'model' needs be double or quadruple that for  Client purposes.. which is the only real use I could envision.

 One could cobble up a sketch model of some curious interface for further study  perhaps.. but a pencil can suffice happily too.

Clients often request  to see/experience just they are buying !.... in detail.  Lack of imagination? whatever, it's their need and it's real.

Many clients have requested and paid for 1/4" scale models. Often of massive size and cost... without raising an eyelid.

 

 Disagree Entirely with your views on Tolerances !!   

You clearly are new at 'architecture' ?   However I won't venture that fruitless digression further.

 

Technician personalities have zero'd in  on accuracy and  tolerances .. Clinging to  precision as a Lifeboat.. in the often glaring absence of every other talent .

An old issue in Architecture .. only the technology has changed.    

 

 Teaching? Lots  of it actually, thank you for asking.

Always in the time proven Mentorship style ie; slow nurturing,  involving years. Decidedly unglamourous and often difficult.

Teaching architecture is about imparting Values, Outlook and yess even artistic Tastes.

  Technical stuff... any one can learn.. even on DIY 3d printer forums. Should they want to

 Models ? My offices supported a Models  group,  students/interns typically, that began their craft eaducation building models for study and presentation.

Quality was invariably outstanding as there was love/ commitment applied.  A lot to be learned in building (even a model) of someone's design.

 G'day.

 

I won't be revisiting this :-)

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15 hours ago, Stefania Dinea said:

and the digital age has made the new generation forget about the important of tolerances.  

Lawdy Miss Clawdy, I have seen that in every creative industry I have been involved with in the last 30 years. What was supposed to give us great power, instead, gave us great laziness. Thank you for saying that!!

 

On 4/6/2018 at 1:52 AM, danilo said:

I've seen experienced the race to the digital  age. Some has been great some... some much less than great :-)

This is not limited to the digital age, yet seems to be a big point that everyone wants to make.

 

Here is one advantage of printing over making materials and then assembling materials:

 

Get it right in the computer, set it to print, and then do other things. Let the printer work while you are not focused on that one endeavor it is performing. Checking on it? Yes. Focused on it? No. Kinda like killing two birds with one stone.

11 hours ago, danilo said:

I won't be revisiting this :-)

Otay...I will let Spanky and the rest of the gang know.....

Edited by kmanstudios

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11 hours ago, danilo said:

A 17 by 17 cm  Study model isn't worth the trouble to be Blunt ..No designer needs such a visual aid.. certainly as a miniature.

Size  of the plastic 'model' needs be double or quadruple that for  Client purposes..

Oh, lest I forget, that is why you can break models into parts that are easy to assemble and make a larger piece at the end. Still a massive time saver.

 

Cherry picking reasons for poo pooing an idea overall is not really a valid argument and creates a false equivalency. Just because you never wanted smaller models, I have seen many places that do that itself. I have seen massive, I have seen small. All depends on the end goals really, not just a single shop's experience.

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Please do not be putt off by what one old Architect thinks (mostly incorrectly from my point of view!) I value your input and am glad to be working in a practice where we see the use of 3D printing. Our small massing models are loved by our clients as they represent an easy way for the layman to understand a scheme. Completely agree with your response about time saved. One of our offices conducted a massing model experiment where we pitted 3D printer against hand modelling: the 3d printer won on both time and quality!

 

My only issue is that we use ArchiCAD not Revit so if anyone here has any helpful hints and tips for this it would be greatly appreciated, if not I guess I'll have to get to grips and share my experiences too :)

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1 minute ago, Alex L said:

if not I guess I'll have to get to grips and share my experiences too :)

 

Hi @Alex L, that would definitely be much appreciated if you could share some of your experiences. That will certainly attract more architects with tips of their own and eventually we'll all learn from each other and grow in our professions. 

 

Could you name a thing or two what you would like to learn re ArchiCAD? How is the integration with Cura? 

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@Alex L - thanks for the feedback - I would love to see an archicad tips&tricks and I am sure that there are more who would as well- I haven't opened that software in almost 7 years (to my shame)- since the industry and education drove me towards Revit. I can go through Rhino a little bit when I am done and swim through MOI as well.  However I think some of the general things can be double checked - like is topography printable, how about entourage, and/or families? 

 

Let us know ;)

 

//S

 

 

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6 hours ago, SandervG said:

 

Hi @Alex L, that would definitely be much appreciated if you could share some of your experiences. That will certainly attract more architects with tips of their own and eventually we'll all learn from each other and grow in our professions. 

 

Could you name a thing or two what you would like to learn re ArchiCAD? How is the integration with Cura? 

I guess the most important thing for us would be how to best prepare a model for export as an efficient .STL file - Things like curtain walling seem far too complicated for Cura (when opening in Sketchup they are made of many many surfaces and Cura fails to read this as an element which it can slice properly) So it would seem things like this need tuning to simple solids before exporting.

6 hours ago, Stefania Dinea said:

@Alex L - thanks for the feedback - I would love to see an archicad tips&tricks and I am sure that there are more who would as well- I haven't opened that software in almost 7 years (to my shame)- since the industry and education drove me towards Revit. I can go through Rhino a little bit when I am done and swim through MOI as well.  However I think some of the general things can be double checked - like is topography printable, how about entourage, and/or families? 

 

Let us know ;)

 

//S

 

 

You should definitely give it another try (not everyone is moving to Revit! ;) ), it is getting more like sketchup and now has integration with grasshopper which is pretty exciting - I just need to keep playing with it to get the best out of Cura. Which isn't always easy when running live jobs.

 

I will give printing meshes a go over then next couple of weeks and let you know how I get on.

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@Alex L 

 

I guess the most important thing for us would be how to best prepare a model for export as an efficient .STL file - Things like curtain walling seem far too complicated for Cura (when opening in Sketchup they are made of many many surfaces and Cura fails to read this as an element which it can slice properly) So it would seem things like this need tuning to simple solids before exporting.

 

I have printed a lot of curtain walls and windows elements and very thin details, and this topic will be included in my :how to: sections to come. I personally am not a sketchup user, and I personally refuse to touch that software 1. it's heavy on import  2. the 3D printing hassle killed it for me. However i do use a lot of rhino and grasshopper because I can import it into Revit and all that jazz. 

 

Like the hexagonal CW - that was a pain to model, not so much to print, but not impossible - now I can do it faster and more precise.Will explain in a later post.

x2.thumb.JPG.99fc6fef4cfffba4a4a2231c14847c93.JPG

 

However, I have a manual I need to look for that I usually throw at my sketchup using colleagues - and I believe I can share that with you since it's online open source.  

what I can tell you for sure is that you are correct, you need solids!!!

 

 

You should definitely give it another try (not everyone is moving to Revit! ;) ), it is getting more like sketchup and now has integration with grasshopper which is pretty exciting - I just need to keep playing with it to get the best out of Cura. Which isn't always easy when running live jobs.

 

No matter which software I use, I believe some of the tips are standard. The same method can be applied to multiple tools. Archicad I will open at one point, however -sketchup - long term personal grudge :)) I am sorry - not for me!  

 

I will give printing meshes a go over then next couple of weeks and let you know how I get on. 

 

Please do, looking forward - and I am sure the sketchup users will also be glad to have someone in their corner.

 

//S

 

x2.JPG

Edited by Stefania Dinea
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