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I want to buy a ultimaker but don't know if it's useful for my project . I have uploaded a PDF with a part of my project. It's very important to have this dimensions. So my question is if a ultimaker can print this. 

 

Also which settings do I have to put on cura to get a very good print? 

 

Thank you. 

Mechanic nach Tuorial-1.pdf

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If these dimensions are in mm then, "no".  Ultimaker printers can't print this.  Walls thinner than 0.2mm are quite difficult if not impossible.  If these dimensions are in meters then again, no these parts are much too large to fit in an ultimaker printer.  If these dimensions are in inches then it looks quite easy to print.

 

How thick are those walls in your drawing?  And what is the length of the longest dimension?

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How many do you plan to make?  If you will be making hundreds of these but all different then I would definitely consider buying a printer.  Probably a UM2go but it depends on what else you will print.  the um2go is probably going to give you the best accuracy.  And upgrade it to have an olson block and a 0.25mm nozzle.

 

But before you buy a printer, I would send this off to shapeways.com and have them print it.  Then also use 3dhubs to have it printed using an Ultimaker printer (preferably a UM2 or UM2go).

 

You need to see typical quality which might not be good enough for whatever this thing will be used for.

 

This part being only 7mm across should cost about $5 or 5 euros to print at shapeways.  Similar price on 3dhubs.

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I am not sure it is wise to be recommending 3DHubs these days given their recent business attitude?

 

UM2+ would be my choice, the complexity of a UM3 is unnecessary expense for creating this part.

I would second the 0.25 mm nozzle though if dimensional accuracy is most important.

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Depending on the required accuracy for a good fit (e.g. if it is for tube-couplings for gasses or liquids), I think you might be a bit disappointed with 3D-prints of such tiny models. The layer lines are going to be visible, and accuracy might not be good enough. So you definitely need to get some test samples before buying a printer. Preferably go to someone where you can watch the whole printing process from start to finish.

 

If it is for use in an architectural demo model, thus non functional, and if exact fit is not so much of a consideration, it might be good enough.

 

If you have never 3D-printed before, expect a learning curve, and plan that in.

 

If you need lots of them, all identical, you might also consider low-volume injection moulding in a cheap aluminum mould. For example the sort of things that a company like protolabs can do ("www.protolabs.com").

 

I am very happy with our 3D-printers, but we mainly print prototypes of ca. 100mm x 50mm x 6mm, and absolute accuracy is not required. 3D-design and 3D-printing is one of the best investments we did in our lab, and I am glad we made that step, even though it took a lot of effort. But we can now make things we could never have done otherwise.

 

But I would not be happy if I had to use it for printing HO-scale model cars (1:87), which are highly detailed and are very small. For such models the prints would not be detailed enough, and the layer lines would destroy the smooth curves of the cars.

 

Have a look at these models: they are printed at 0.1mm layer height and a standard 0.4mm nozzle. With 0.06mm layer height, a 0.25mm nozzle, and more patience, you can get better accuracy, but these effects will still be visible somewhat. It really depends on your requirements.

 

Maybe someone else has a picture of a small model printed with 0.25mm nozzle and 0.06mm layers?

 

horseshoeclip.jpg.f0b28c4ee645faf0935adc8b67b35887.jpg

 

anti_unwind_clamp1.jpg.60043c893e471c7cb2368b725b09f1b1.jpg

 

snake_clamp1.thumb.jpg.aebd165b44691e50a1c55abe0f07e3f8.jpg

 

 

 

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Seriously - if you need to print that thing with much accuracy you are not likely to be happy with a FFF printer like an Ultimaker.  It can do it but this part is on the small end of what an FFF printer can do.

 

Instead, look at the form2 printer first.  Or b9creator.  Have people print that thing for you first.  Especially shapeways.  Don't buy a printer until you have seen what that printer can do and held your part in your hands printed with the actual model of printer you are thinking of buying.

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On 5/16/2018 at 2:24 AM, gr5 said:

Oh wait.  I was looking at it wrong.  Okay - if those are in inches or mm then it's probably printable.

Oh ok so thats better. True. I have to order first a test of my object. I am not really sure which printer I have to buy. I will going to print all my projects at home and the form2 is not a choice because of the resin. I have a 8months baby ? its to dangerous . 

 

Ok I will order my project first and will tell you if the accuracy is okay. Thank you all for the help. Very nice. 

 

 

Edited by Viasavva

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