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AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
6 minutes ago, valcrow said:

I know there's a lot of properties and factors involved, but in your mind, what is the main factors that would make you choose GFPA6 over GFPP or vice versa?

If I'm deciding GFPP or GFPA6 it comes down to size and surface finish. If I'm looking for something with amazing surface finish I would choose the GFPP. If the part is large or the surface area that is touching the build plate consumes most of the area I would choose GFPA6 as there is no warping issues. GFPP can be tricky to print large flat parts.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
Just now, EVQT_XSTRAND_OC said:

A continuous fiber will provide higher strength and stiffness than a short fiber, allowing for printing semi structural to structural parts.

Thanks for answering that as that  is what I have been reading. But the number of printers that do continuous fibre are very limited. What would be a good resource to find the diffrerences in strength....ie. is is negligible enough to overlook. Size of parts is also a factor.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
4 minutes ago, AD_XSTRAND_OC said:

If I'm deciding GFPP or GFPA6 it comes down to size and surface finish. If I'm looking for something with amazing surface finish I would choose the GFPP. If the part is large or the surface area that is touching the build plate consumes most of the area I would choose GFPA6 as there is no warping issues. GFPP can be tricky to print large flat parts.

Naah its not that difficult if you use the smartmaterials3d smart stick ? Totally loved that ?

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

Another question that came in via a different channel: Do you also experiment with other additives to give different properties to filaments, like conductive filaments? 

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

Hi,

Are the XSTRAND products saline environment resistant ? I am thinking about boat spare parts.

Thanks

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
30 minutes ago, SandervG said:

Wow, that is pretty amazing! Was it eventually used as an end use part, in the race or just as a prototype? Do you know if they also sanded the model before coating it? I know XSTRAND has a bit of a rougher texture, which can be great depending on your use but since it is so strong, I wonder what they used to sand the surface (if they did). 

I'm not sure if it has been used or will be used. In fact this was the first one made and it was just finished with coating about 2 weeks ago so still early in the process. Yes they sanded and primer prepped the part first. Very similar process as what you would do if you were using bondo.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
23 minutes ago, AD_XSTRAND_OC said:

John, we do have 50 Gram samples. I believe Emmanuel can go into more detail into about acquiring them. Would 50 grams be enough or are you thinking more?

John, send a note to 3Dprinting@owenscorning.com and our team will be happy to  provide you some samples of material :)

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
4 minutes ago, SandervG said:

Another question that came in via a different channel: Do you also experiment with other additives to give different properties to filaments, like conductive filaments? 

So far we never tried others additives than glass. Core competencies of Owens Corning is fiberglass reinforcement, so we want to stick to it for now.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
10 minutes ago, rajilpahuja said:

Naah its not that difficult if you use the smartmaterials3d smart stick ? Totally loved that ?

well good to know thank you!

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

Tensile strength of the strongest nylon's I've seen is 55mpa.  Glass is typically 50mpa.  So how do you get xstrand with nylon and glass to be 100 mpa (my own tests with xstrand GF30PA6 yielded 80mpa which is still > 55)?  Is it a special glass that is stronger than typical window glass?

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
8 minutes ago, PromakerFr said:

Hi,

Are the XSTRAND products saline environment resistant ? I am thinking about boat spare parts.

Thanks

GF30-PP is perfect for such application. Watch out this video that we did with our partner SEAIR, a startup that is developping foil for marine application. 

 

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
8 minutes ago, gr5 said:

Tensile strength of the strongest nylon's I've seen is 55mpa.  Glass is typically 50mpa.  So how do you get xstrand with nylon and glass to be 100 mpa (my own tests with xstrand GF30PA6 yielded 80mpa which is still > 55)?  Is it a special glass that is stronger than typical window glass?

Glass fibers have a much higher tensile strength than regular glass (200-500 times stronger than regular glass) Typical value of tensile strength for fiberglass is in the range of 1900 to 2000 MPa

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
59 minutes ago, JohnInOttawa said:

Thanks for your reply.  To be clear, I don't have a problem with the premium price.  It's just an entry barrier to evaluation. 

It might help to understand that there are many, many products that have come out lately with pretty impressive claims.  It's simply impossible to justify buying a full roll of all of them. 

 

I would like to clarify though, is there a shelf life to the GF30-PA6?

Thanks

John

John, I believe Emmanuel answered your other question but as for the shelf life...you are looking at 10 years as long as the storage complies with the TDS document which states it must be stored in a dry and temperate location and should remain in original packaging.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

Wow, many thanks to everyone who participated. It's been a very interesting AMA and I hope @AD_XSTRAND_OC and @EVQT_XSTRAND_OC were able to answer most questions you had. It's quite a new subject, but hopefully everyone gained a little bit more of an understanding about abrasive materials, glass filled materials and the properties they provide. I certainly found it very interesting. 

 

But, all things must come to an end and so does this AMA. If you have any questions popping up later through the day or after reading this AMA feel free to add them below. Unfortunately, the window where Adam's and Emmanuel's brain was immediately available closed, but when they're available they agreed to answer any questions that come in later. 

 

If you are curious about their material profiles and try XSTRAND, it is now included in the new Ultimaker Cura 3.6 Beta that launched today! Visit the marketplace in Ultimaker Cura, which can be found in the top menu and go to right tab; materials. You will find Owens Corning, and a few others ?

 

And as always, if you tested Ultimaker Cura 3.6 Beta and have any feedback or questions for us? Help us by sharing them here

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
1 hour ago, EVQT_XSTRAND_OC said:

John, send a note to 3Dprinting@owenscorning.com and our team will be happy to  provide you some samples of material ?

 Thank you!  That would do nicely!

 

Much appreciated.

John

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

@JohnInOttawa You'd better tell us the results of your tests once you get those filaments, John. Lucky you! ?

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

I shall post results.  In fact, what I am hoping to do is print the exact same test part with these samples, compare it to my nylon and nylforce CF.  I somehow suspect I will be offering someone a good deal on the nylforce after that....

 

John

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

I'd take you on this deal if there wasn't an ocean between us, thus prohibitive shipping costs.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

just curious but what does a flat top surface look like close up? they look great in the photos but a close up would be nice for reference? also the layer height used for final prototypes or products themselves? rather than draft settings?

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

Can you please tell me what support material is recommend for all new materials? 

 

Stefan 

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
1 hour ago, Stefan93 said:

Can you please tell me what support material is recommend for all new materials? 

 

Stefan 

Hi Stefan,

 

There is not really a 'all new materials', so that may be a bit tricky to answer. Can you specify which material you are interested in? 

Talking about XSTRAND, 2 answers have already been provided. Adam said 'For the PA6 Xstrand you can use the PVA or breakaway supports and even HIPS.' and 'For the PP Xstrand I prefer to use PPxstrand as the supports for best results. Set gap between the top support layer and the bottow layer part to 0.10-0.15mm' 

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

First off, thank you for organising this AMA.  This was my first chance to participate in one and I found it really helpful on a number of fronts.

 

One question I meant to ask and just did not recall on the day, was, has Owens Corning run any comparative analysis on their product vs Markforged Onyx?  I appreciate that it would be hard to do this properly as the Onyx product would really have to be printed in the Markforged eco system for a fair test.  That said, it occurs to me that an apples to apples comparison would greatly clarify the case for choosing an Ultimaker S5 (or UM3 with modified feeders and print cores) over a Markforged Onyx One.

 

Probably the biggest single capital decision I face in the next 18 months, as I consolidate some of my CNC processes, is whether I can economically produce a true, equivalent-service-life  additive replacement to a CNC'ed part.  At present there aren't a lot of competitors in the continuous fibre reinforced printing, or office based metal printing, but then the bulk of what I do doesn't need reinforcing. 

 

So, for nylon or plastic based parts, If XSTRAND can do (most or all of) what Onyx does, then Ultimaker wins with layer height, dual extrusion and swappable print cores so I can move on to the next job with the same unit. 

 

Is there any way to route this question to our XSTRAND gurus?  Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

 

Cheers

John

 

 

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™
On ‎11‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 3:53 PM, JohnInOttawa said:

First off, thank you for organising this AMA.  This was my first chance to participate in one and I found it really helpful on a number of fronts.

 

One question I meant to ask and just did not recall on the day, was, has Owens Corning run any comparative analysis on their product vs Markforged Onyx?  I appreciate that it would be hard to do this properly as the Onyx product would really have to be printed in the Markforged eco system for a fair test.  That said, it occurs to me that an apples to apples comparison would greatly clarify the case for choosing an Ultimaker S5 (or UM3 with modified feeders and print cores) over a Markforged Onyx One.

 

Probably the biggest single capital decision I face in the next 18 months, as I consolidate some of my CNC processes, is whether I can economically produce a true, equivalent-service-life  additive replacement to a CNC'ed part.  At present there aren't a lot of competitors in the continuous fibre reinforced printing, or office based metal printing, but then the bulk of what I do doesn't need reinforcing. 

 

So, for nylon or plastic based parts, If XSTRAND can do (most or all of) what Onyx does, then Ultimaker wins with layer height, dual extrusion and swappable print cores so I can move on to the next job with the same unit. 

 

Is there any way to route this question to our XSTRAND gurus?  Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

 

Cheers

John

 

 

 

Maybe I can help you out on that. Onyx, by itself, is a rather mediocre PA6-Nylon filled with milled fibers. Pure Onyx parts get quite soft after some time, due to them absorbing moisture from the ambient air. Onyx with *continuous* fiber reinforcement is a whole different story though. You get exceptionally stiff and strong parts, by far better than what is achievable with non-continous reinforcement (for example up to 48 GPa flexural modulus for Onyx+Carbon Fibres, compared to 6 GPa for XSTRAND GF30-PA6). If you can directly replace a CNC milled part still depends on the specific use case, however.

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Posted · AMA: Oct 31st | Owens Corning - XSTRAND™

That helps tremendously!

 

For sure, the addition of continuous fibre reinforcement is a game changer and Markforged has the success to show for it.  Your commentary on Onyx alone speaks directly to this comparison though and adds an important consideration - how long will the part retain the properties it held at the time of printing?

 

If XSTRAND produces better results than straight up Onyx, then it means the holder of a (modified) UM3 or an S5, or for that matter any printer that can handle the Owens-Corning product, should, in many cases, be able to produce the same results, or better than the MarkForged Onyx One printer (which cannot incorporate continuous fibre).  I say 'many cases' because there are additional features like the ability to remove and replace the table while embedding parts, etc that are still rather unique and might be required for a given print.

 

For a small shop like mine that gets request for Onyx parts more and more these days, being able to offer a truly equal or better result without the capital cost means being able to compete in a new market with a printer that, unlike the Onyx One, can print with dissolvable or breakaway support, or alternatively, mixed materials (as @SteveCox3D illustrated in one of his excellent posts).

 

Much appreciated!

 

John

 

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