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kmanstudios

Gyroids and how to do them

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Well, that is what I am calling them. Best name I can come up with. Feel a bit like the old Chinese guy in 'Tremors' that can only come up with 'graboids' for a name.

 

First, appropriate thanks to @smartavionics for even putting this infill into Cura because most of the infills will block light getting into the shell and/or letting light pass through.

 

Second, a lot of people think I am a bit of the putz becauses I am just blunt. Ain't a mean bone in my body, but, well, just blunt. Should have seen me 4 years ago before the Asperger's diagnosis and then getting help in modifying some of that. Sometimes I over compensate and then people get weird because they want to read other intentions. So, why bring this up> Instead of focusing on my communications limitations, try to see the information I want to share from nearly 30 years of CG work and 40 years as a commercial artist. I take a lot of my experiences as a traditional artist and reinterpret into CG aspects, including printing.

 

So, this is an expansion of a reply sent in a private message. And, I want to share the information with anybody that wants to play. It does require some modeling capability and planning.

 

To get this effect as seen in this image:

Dancer.thumb.jpg.061424727ffc2383e589b8081cf26ff8.jpg

I do the following:

  1. For the transparents, I am using one shell. But, because I am using a 0.8 nozzle, it is a very thick shell.
  2. I am also using big layer heights. 0.3 to 0.53 depending on materials
  3. This is solved by creating a copied mesh and cutting away the parts that I do not want. In this case, the dress and not the body. Then manually 'thickening' of that mesh in all directions. I am using 3DS MAX to do this with the 'push' modifier. This will push the vertices/faces. in the direction of the 'vertex/face normals.' this means a thicker 'shell' around the main model. In this case I am pushing the faces and vertices just a small amount of 0.5 or less to encase the model in Cura after merging into placement.
  4. When importing, I use 'per model' settings to select mesh type and then 'modify settings for infill of other model." Edit: Again, thanks, in this case, to @ahoeben and @bagel-orb for this getting put into place. I think I got that correct.
    1. This lets me change density of infill for specific areas. In this case, the dress.
  5. Then I merge and slice.

 

Then for solid models like this image:

GyroidedSolid.thumb.jpg.1e35ee168ea216dad510d39f2d2fbb03.jpg

I do this:

  1. For the solids, I am using default shells as I am not worried about transparencies. But, in this case, still using the 0.8 and still getting 'hairy' prints. I just honestly have not taken the time to work that out as I am trying to get as many prints before surgery.
  2. Still using layer heights. 0.3 to 0.53 depending on materials. Will get around to using 0.4 nozzles soon on these. But the 0.8 make the print much faster. Also, kinda like the 'beading effect.'
  3. Infill overlap is basically a horizontal expansion on the infill and will not expand vertically
  4. Again, this is solved by creating a copied mesh and cutting away the parts that I do not want. In this case, the dress and not the body. Then manually 'thickening' of that mesh in all directions. I am using 3DS MAX to do this with the 'push' modifier. This will push the vertices/faces. in the direction of the 'vertex/face normals.' this means a thicker 'shell' around the main model. In this case I am pushing the faces and vertices just a small amount of 0.5 or less to minimize the amount of 'infill poking out' from the main model.
  5. When importing, I use 'per model' settings to remove all shell structures of that pushed model. This will only print the very small mount of infill.
  6. Then I merge and slice.

For this model:

ThinWalled.thumb.jpg.ed6b1bea0efa75dc57c5b20ceee4b092.jpg

 

I am just using the 0.8 single shell. But the walls are thin because it is a 'hollowed out' model. Nothing special other than choosing the infill colours or density.

So, there ya go. That is it in a nutshell.

 

Edited by kmanstudios
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yep. nothing more than that. Or, let the patterns be manipulated by region. For instance, in the dancer, I used an overall pattern in the model as a whole, but used the model settings to dictate a denser pattern to alter the light passing through areas.

 

But, it is basically the same thing. Just one is internal and, if chosen, one external. Infill expansion will not protrude except horizontally, thus needing the extra model to create a specified area in all directions for infill poking through uniformly.

Edited by kmanstudios

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Do I understand it correctly that for the first model (the red dancer) you split the original model into multiple models? Thus into a sort of "shell model" and an "infill model" (or multiple infill models). And then adjust each one separately to your desires? And then have them printed all in one shot with different colors and settings?

 

Does your method also work with fine layer heights (like 0.06mm...0.1mm), 0.4mm nozzle, and double wall shells? Or would that diffract and reflect the light flow too much? For example if you wanted to smooth the edges with acetone like cloakfiend's method?

 

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40 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

Do I understand it correctly that for the first model (the red dancer) you split the original model into multiple models? Thus into a sort of "shell model" and an "infill model" (or multiple infill models). And then adjust each one separately to your desires? And then have them printed all in one shot with different colors and settings?

Here is an image of how I set up the dancer file:

GyroidsHowTo.thumb.jpg.da680e951166002dd039aa536c18602b.jpg

 

The Master model is all intact.

The model for modifying has the body removed and then 'pushed' out along the vertex/face normals so that it encapsulates the parts I want.

 

With the modifier model, I tell it to use a different density. This way I do not have to worry about the proper meetup of two separate models and can control whether it as more or fewer walls.

 

The main system has an infill of say 8% gyroid. Then I use the modifying model to use, say, a 30% gyroid. Both of these are just numbers for example and will depend on the model employed.

 

The only control I have found for colours is that you can specify shell colour and and infill colour.

 

44 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

Does your method also work with fine layer heights (like 0.06mm...0.1mm), 0.4mm nozzle, and double wall shells? Or would that diffract and reflect the light flow too much? For example if you wanted to smooth the edges with acetone like cloakfiend's method? 

Would not know about transparents, but would work with solid models in the example above.

 

In transparent materials, I use a large bore nozzle and one wall at larger than normal layer heights. This increases the transparency by eliminating air gaps between walls.

 

But the only way to really to tell would be to experiment. Basically I followed this example:

http://taulman3d.com/t-glase-features.html

 

Once I found this, it became the template I worked from.

 

As for smoothing the surface, I would think that applying any chemical to the materials would cloud it. Personally, I like the way the layers work with the light. And, most people who have held the physical models seem to like the look as well.

 

I have not gotten around to using my XTC-3D yet to see how that would help.

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Ive seen xtc work well with transparent filament, some dude was making lenses and although small looked pretty good. There is also light cured resin and nail varnish to try. Also a thick layer of superglue might work (it sands clear and can be polished!). Might cloud up though? Maybe superglue remove. I remember that melting plastic. So many things to try....when i have time, lol.

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15 hours ago, kmanstudios said:

Here is an image of how I set up the dancer file:

GyroidsHowTo.thumb.jpg.da680e951166002dd039aa536c18602b.jpg

 

The Master model is all intact.

The model for modifying has the body removed and then 'pushed' out along the vertex/face normals so that it encapsulates the parts I want.

 

With the modifier model, I tell it to use a different density. This way I do not have to worry about the proper meetup of two separate models and can control whether it as more or fewer walls.

 

The main system has an infill of say 8% gyroid. Then I use the modifying model to use, say, a 30% gyroid. Both of these are just numbers for example and will depend on the model employed.

 

...

 

Thanks for the clarification.

 

I think the gyroids add an extra dimension to the typical fluidness (I don't know a better English word) of your designs. It fits well together.

 

I wonder how long it will take before industrial designers are going to try gyroids in overmoulding, in their injection moulded tooth brushes, decorative vases and statues, and sex toys indeed? Sort of gyroids, because you can't injection mould cavities with deep undercuts of course. With misty, translucent materials the effect might work. I haven't seen anything like this yet, apart from marbles.

 

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35 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

I haven't seen anything like this yet, apart from marbles.

I am sure someone will figure it out. Until then it is a unique opportunity for 3D printing.

 

36 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

Thanks for the clarification.

You are welcome :)

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@geert_2 asked about transparency and printing them.

 

I saw this post elsewhere and though I do not think it would be good for what I am doing above, I think it is a good thing to consider for other projects.

 

https://hackaday.com/2018/12/11/true-transparent-parts-from-a-desktop-3d-printer/?fbclid=IwAR3uP3W0fAE_ej6bp8VvflOeXPvFEv7yyHoH-jEt8jJBPWlaoNjq9E33tVg

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On 12/12/2018 at 9:42 AM, kmanstudios said:

@geert_2 asked about transparency and printing them.

 

I saw this post elsewhere and though I do not think it would be good for what I am doing above, I think it is a good thing to consider for other projects.

 

https://hackaday.com/2018/12/11/true-transparent-parts-from-a-desktop-3d-printer/?fbclid=IwAR3uP3W0fAE_ej6bp8VvflOeXPvFEv7yyHoH-jEt8jJBPWlaoNjq9E33tVg

 

Thanks for that link. Remarkable that they achieve best transparency by doing exactly the opposite of what is usually recommended: very thin instead of very thick layers. I am going to try that next time I print in transparent PET.

 

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