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svetsch

Complete heated bed kit for Ultimaker

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Well that's completely different. Before your tape wasn't sticking well enough. Now it's the part. Could you show a photo of the part? Or a cad drawing? did you use Brim? Lots and lots of brim?

Brim makes a huge difference sometimes but it's important to get high flow or very good first layer - you can't have any air gaps. The PLA is held down by the van der wals force (I assume) and once you lift the corner it's over. The Brim helps this quite a bit.

Also there are things you can do to the model. For example, solid infill is the worst thing you can do as those solid inner layers pull very very hard as they shrink. So a more open part (e.g. 20% infill or put vertical holes in the part as part of the design) can help quite a bit.

Also having the bottom 5mm be completely vertical or sloping inward helps. Like a pyramid so that the stresses are pulling, but not lifting. Having the bottom few layers angle outward (for example a curved corner along the edges is bad) makes it lift easier.

 

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I went back to using the blue tape and added clips along the outside edge of the tape after stretching it as tight onto the acrylic surface as I could. I finally got one of the flattest prints I've been able to get using this setup.

Non-solid infill isn't an option, as the walls of this part are only 3mm thick and are required in order to maintain torsional stability. It's basically a very shallow box.

The print from the tape is on the left below. The print on glass, using PVA glue is on the right.

Solar Cell Casing

I'm wondering if I should have mixed the glue stronger than 3 to 1. I really liked that smooth bottom surface. I wish I could get the same print surface that I have on my CubeX because hairspray works crazy well on that surface. It seems like a ceramic surface. I printed a skull overnight on the CubeX and had a hard time removing it this morning. Unfortunately, the tolerances are too tight on this solar cell casing to switch to using the CubeX for printing them, at this point. I designed it to adjust for the print error on the Ultimaker, because I had 5 lbs. of red filament for the Ultimaker. I'd have to re-work the model measurements by trial and error to get it just right on the CubeX. Plus, the CubeX version of red is more like red-orange. Yuck.

Just for fun, here's the skull I printed overnight on the CubeX.

Skull (2) (1024x938)

 

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Non-solid infill isn't an option,

 

You can't put holes in the bottom? In the middle of the big flat area?

Anyway - did you use brim when printing on glass?

I also have a hard time getting my models up off the blue tape. It is a pain in the neck and I pretty much always tear it to hell and it can take a while. I'm looking forward to testing printing on glass.

 

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No, the design needs to be solid on the back because of the wiring and solar cell electrical contacts inside. This folding panel will produce 4 AMPS of current, which is enough to seriously hurt somebody. Anyway, the glue might not be thick enough or the cheap mirror glass I'm using might be crap. I'm not sure. I plan to try printing on glass again with different glue when I have time. When I do, I'll follow up with a report.

This is just a band-aid fix, really. What I really want is a real kit for a HBP. Having prints stick perfectly and then simply pop loose when the bed cools is just so appealing.

 

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Oh sorry, yes, I've tried a brim a number of times. The brim sticks really well, but the part actually peels away from the brim and still warps. In other words, it leaves the brim attached to the tape, even though the part itself curls up. And yes, the brim distance is set to zero. :)

I think part of the problem is that this particular roll of red filament from UltiMachine is too wet. In order to get it to flow right, I have to print it at 245C, which is crazy for PLA. Since those are ABS temperatures, it seems to be warping like ABS.

 

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Thanks for the suggestions gr5. I can see where making the brim thicker might help a lot. I'll try that. As it is, the part is so big that I can't fit a 20 line brim around it, so I had to reduce it to 6 or so.

This is probably a stupid question, but how can I set the flow higher for only the first few layers? I only see one setting and it appears to set the flow for the entire print.

 

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If you have an ulticontroller you can set the flow but only *after* it starts printing. It's in the "tune" menu which suddenly appears when you start printing from SD card.

You can do almost anything withoug the UC but this is probably one of them. I don't think there is a flow control through Cura print window.

A hack would be to just level the bed a little closer to the nozzle than normal (or spin the Z screw several clicks (maybe 5?) after the print starts). You want lots of juicy, fat, oozing flow. I usually also print the first layer hotter so it flows into the cracks of the tape and also nice and low so it gets pushed into the tape.

Never do a second layer on brim as this can cause lifting/warping (a new hot layer on a cold layer will eventually cool and shrink and pull). But it's fine to do bottom layer .3mm.

 

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what also helps a lot, I think, is to put a strip of tape over the brim as soon as it is finished. Especially on the fan side.

With solid pieces, like buildings, I put on duc tape all around. Be careful that you don't push to hard on the build plate, the springs will give in and will leave uneven deposition of the plastic.

 

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That's often enough. I think you just need a heated bed :( at this point.

 

Yeah, I really do need a heated bed.

Has anyone looked into or tried this kit on their Ultimaker?

http://www.amazon.com/printer-Heated-Aluminium-Borosilicate-Reprap/dp/B00CW9NDJ2/ref=sr_1_3?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1383582934&sr=1-3

I already have this 12V 30A switching power supply:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009EIANT2/ref=oh_details_o01_s04_i02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I believe that would work for the platform, right?

 

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Hello,

I just finished setup my own heated bed using an 6mm aluminium plate and the common reprap PCB heating plate.

Before, I tried also the glass one, but it didn't heated that well.

Now, it works well. But I found it rather difficult to choose all the parts and to find store to get them, specially the correct aluminium plate.

Now I would be interested to help other getting their own heated bed.

For that, a good solution would to sell a kit containing:

* The aluminium plate with all holes done for Ultimaker

* The PCB heater

* A 30A car relay

* All the cables

* The small parts (diodes, resistors, thermistor, etc...)

* Optionally, everything soldered together

In other words, everything except the 30A 12V power supply that you can find everywhere.

My question: How much would you willing to pay for that kit?

 

However much you want for a complete kit. I built my ultimaker from a kit, I built in the dual extrusion and I'm a little tired at this point. I would love something plug and play at this point. Please, someone put together a real kit that is as easy to install as possible. I would pay $300 for something like that or around that... really at this point I'd go higher... there's so much different info out there it's confusing and I have heated bed envy looking at all the platforms that have something they can just order.

 

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Im doing the same thing:

- 24V 15A Industrial PSU: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/LED-Lights-Devices-Switching-Power-Supply-24V15A-AC-DC-PSU-360W-110-220-230V-/181317124619?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item2a3757c20b

- MK3 Alu heatbed: http://reprap.me/alu-reprap-heater-board-mk3.html

- Voltage adjuster/Buck (down to 19V for the UM): http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/131065094245?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

- DC/DC Solid state relay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/190836925629?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2648

Plan is to adjust the 24V down to 19V for the UM board using the buck

Have the UM board control the SSR via the heated bed port, SSR is connected to heated bed and directly to the 24V PSU

 

 

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Im doing the same thing:

- 24V 15A Industrial PSU: LINK

- MK3 Alu heatbed: LINK

- Voltage adjuster/Buck (down to 19V for the UM): LINK

- DC/DC Solid state relay: LINK

Plan is to adjust the 24V down to 19V for the UM board using the buck

Have the UM board control the SSR via the heated bed port, SSR is connected to heated bed and directly to the 24V PSU

 

You can take off the MOSFET put it on a remote PCB feed 24v into that take a wire off the gate pin onto the UM board were the FET came from. No extra cost apart from a tiny bit of strip board. :) simples.

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Im doing the same thing:

- 24V 15A Industrial PSU: LINK

- MK3 Alu heatbed: LINK

- Voltage adjuster/Buck (down to 19V for the UM): LINK

- DC/DC Solid state relay: LINK

Plan is to adjust the 24V down to 19V for the UM board using the buck

Have the UM board control the SSR via the heated bed port, SSR is connected to heated bed and directly to the 24V PSU

 

 

You can adjust the voltage in the power supply itself, no need for the buck.

I tried one of those cheap SSR and it got to hot.

I ended up using a normal relay.

 

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I have been using Ultimaker for while and have been working on developing a heat bed solution for it.

After several iterations I finally got something that is pretty neat I think.

features of my kit:

1. Complete integration of pcb heater onto the aluminium plate. The heater coil is sealed onto a 2mm Alu plate to provide maximum heat transfer and significant reduction of weight.

 

2. Fast heating - from 20C to 100C in 5 minutes (24V 10A 240W DC power supply).

 

3. Integration of power cable and thermistor cable into a single cable plugging onto a pre-soldered 4 pin connector.

 

4. SMT pre-soldered LEDs indicator and Thermistors.

 

5. Standard Ultimaker screw hole pattern for drop in replacement and 6 extra holes for mounting onto other repraps. Support 3-point mounting.

 

 

I ordered a small batch from factory and listing them on ebay:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Heated-Bed-Kit-for-Ultimaker-Reprap-3d-Printers-MK2-PCB-Aluminium-plate-/161157442118?

Your comments will be very welcomed.

Jason

 

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Nice, Jason. Please post a link to a recommended power supply also so people can estimate total cost necessary. You kit should include a 4.7K through-hole resistor to be soldered onto the UM Original board.

Do you print directly on the aluminum plate or do you put kapton tape on it? Or blue tape? Or glass on top?

 

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As I was one of those who could not wait until the official kit arrives, I've built my own heated bed. It offers the possibility to print on the surface of choice. I started today with 3mm Aluminium with Kapton tape. Great stuff! The PLA I printed on it is sticking very well (maybe even too good). I could easily lower the print temperature for the first layer.

Ok, as you guys usually want to have a photo... :grin: Here it is:

Heated bed for Ultimaker Original by Dim3nsioneer

 

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