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cloakfiend

3D Print on Fabric test

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My first experiment with this that i saw on youtube somewhere. My friend asked me to give it a go and this is just some cloned beveled triangles arranged with enough room for flex of the thickness of the mosaic. Annoying to remove but not too bad. Easy to print. Worked first time.

 

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Heres the dirty setup. Layer height 0.2 and just wait untill the first layer is done pop on the fabric and stick it down nice and snug but not stretched. Thrn click resume...fun times. Ill pop some step by step pics next time if you like.

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Yes its very thin and nothing special so im told, my friend just bought me a bit to experiment with. Its like a net though so you have to have a clean nozzle or else it will get caught up on any dried bit amd ruin the fabric. Its quite strong though which is handy. Im doing a spikey test next! 

 

I think its the same material as a wedding veil. Silk mighy also work but is way more expensive.

Edited by cloakfiend

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Well i wasnt sure if i had applied the salt correctly, as i saw no faint mist or anything just water all over the plate so i just heated it up wiped on a few more gentle strokes and it appears to have worked perfectly! So thanks @geert_2 for that! 

 

Below is another test where i printed a few sectios.one way a few the other and a few more alternating. The trouble is that it just ends up looking like an untidy carpet or something? Anyway pics... sorry for the crappy photos my phone cam is dying. The bottom sparkles in the light though! 

 

 

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12 hours ago, cloakfiend said:

Well i wasnt sure if i had applied the salt correctly, as i saw no faint mist or anything just water all over the plate so i just heated it up wiped on a few more gentle strokes and it appears to have worked perfectly! So thanks @geert_2 for that! 

...

 

I am glad it worked well.

 

Normally I apply a few drops of very salt water on the glass (not too much, no flooding), using a pipette, and then I gently wipe it with a paper tissue until dry. It takes only 30 seconds or so.

 

I found the salt method generally works very well for wide and low objects that can be printed in a couple of hours (as typical for my dental models). But it works far less for narrow and high objects like statues that need all day to print: then edges tend to curl up. So if you would ever try it for a high statue, be sure to stay around so you can abort if it should come off. Or apply a brim or Mickey mouse ears to the model.

 

I still don't know the chemical *why* it works, since salt isn't exactly known as a glue. I guess it has to do with increased surface tension due to the salt, but that is only a guess.

 

Concerning printing on fabric: maybe the stuff used for thin white curtains might also work? It is usually quite strong. Not sure what material that is: glass fiber, nylon,...?

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