Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
tonino

what the differences beetwin ultimaker 2 and ultimaker 1 ?

Recommended Posts

The Ultimaker 2 is a refinement of the original model, designed for even greater accuracy, consistency, and reliability. The original model continues to be sold, and is still a good printer :-)

I've been working with the UM2 for a couple of days now at the Maker Faire, and the main differences I see include:

- the frame is cosmetically nicer - being cut from dibond material which is a metal skin over a dense core.

- the printer has a heated bed, and now homes to the bottom, back, left corner.

- new metal hot end with a smaller hot zone for better control over oozing and faster more accurate retraction

- smaller, quieter direct-drive extruder mechanism that is controlled from the integrated matrix-display control panel: there is no longer a gear wheel you can grab to extrude by hand :-(

- new, single board integrated electronics that is passively cooled, so has no fan, which makes it quieter.

- physically shielded motors and electronics

- integrated rgb LED strip lighting

The bottom line is that the new printer looks smarter, runs quieter, and prints with a little more accuracy. We've been printing Emmett's gear bearing (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:53451) and barspins 3D printable wrench (

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:139268) and had them work straight off the bed with basically no clean up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you print directly on the glass? No more hassle with the blue tape would be a REAL improvement. Glue stick?

How much power does the machine draw? if you run it a lot, a heated bed can make for quite an electricity bill.

Do the two fans cool the top part of the hotend as well as the object?

I think having injection molded pieces holding the linear bearings is an improvement on the gantry if there is a way to tension the belts.

Bed leveling seems to be simplified too.

What is thew processor on board?

I have not followed the latest developments of CURA. Is it up to the challenge of running the printer?

Is the extruder an improvement? Have some doubts as to the impossibility of advancing the filament by hand....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ultimaker 2 is a refinement of the original model, designed for even greater accuracy, consistency, and reliability. The original model continues to be sold, and is still a good printer :smile:

I've been working with the UM2 for a couple of days now at the Maker Faire, and the main differences I see include:

- the frame is cosmetically nicer - being cut from dibond material which is a metal skin over a dense core.

- the printer has a heated bed, and now homes to the bottom, back, left corner.

- new metal hot end with a smaller hot zone for better control over oozing and faster more accurate retraction

- smaller, quieter direct-drive extruder mechanism that is controlled from the integrated matrix-display control panel: there is no longer a gear wheel you can grab to extrude by hand :sad:

- new, single board integrated electronics that is passively cooled, so has no fan, which makes it quieter.

- physically shielded motors and electronics

- integrated rgb LED strip lighting

The bottom line is that the new printer looks smarter, runs quieter, and prints with a little more accuracy. We've been printing Emmett's gear bearing (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:53451) and barspins 3D printable wrench (

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:139268) and had them work straight off the bed with basically no clean up.

 

What is the maximum move speed? How has moving the extra mass of the extruder to the print head affect things? How much heaver is the print head vs the original? Are the linear motion components basically the same?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The print head is about the same mass or lighter; the speed capabilities are about the same; perhaps offering better print quality at the same speed. Retraction distances are shorter which saves time and helps with print quality.

The extruder is still a Bowden model - just not geared as the current one is: it has a small directly driven feeder bolt on the back panel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Do you print directly on the glass? No more hassle with the blue tape would be a REAL improvement. Glue stick?

The UM people were printing directly on glass with glue stick and with the bed at a "low" temp. I think around 50C. The heat helps it stick.

>How much power does the machine draw? if you run it a lot, a heated bed can make for quite an electricity bill.

Don't know, but if you print PLA - you mostly can keep the temp low.

>Do the two fans cool the top part of the hotend as well as the object?

No. There is a 3rd fan not visible in any photos. In the back. It's even smaller than the 2 side fans. It cools the upper region of the hot end to keep heat from rising up and causing a partial melt followed by a clog.

>I think having injection molded pieces holding the linear bearings is an improvement on the gantry if there is a way to >tension the belts.

Belt tensioners hidden inside. Built in.

>What is thew processor on board?

Arduino. Same thing. With Marlin.

>Have some doubts as to the impossibility of advancing the filament by hand....

Me too, but I watched it happen many times and it worked. I think it should be the MAIN control on the display when it isn't printing instead of the feedrate. So if you do nothing, turning the dial controlls extruder. It should not be burried in menus.

But the concept of skirt and never needing to level again helps a lot.

One thing to note - the current is controllable now in Marlin to all the steppers. So the current to the extruder is set to a value that will skip steps before grinding filament. So you can have it "auto load" the filament where it sucks the filament in and sends it right into the head and lets it skip steps for a few seconds and you are primed with no filament grinding.

- George

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Have some doubts as to the impossibility of advancing the filament by hand....

Me too, but I watched it happen many times and it worked. I think it should be the MAIN control on the display when it isn't printing instead of the feedrate. So if you do nothing, turning the dial controlls extruder. It should not be burried in menus.

 

The new menu implementation has a totally different menu when you are printing then when you have the "main" menu.

Basic menu structure is:

Main menu: "print" - "material" - "maintenance" (shown when you turn the printer on)

Print menu: Select a file on SD card. (After selecting the file you enter the printing menu)

Material menu: "change" - "settings" (Allows you to start the material change procedure, and adjust material settings)

Maintenance menu: Allows you to re-run the bed leveling wizard, as well as going into an advance menu where you can do stuff like heating up the bed and turning on the fans.

Printing menu: Allows you to goto the tune-printing menu, as well as aborting the print.

Tune menu: Allows you to tune speed, temperatures, fans and retraction settings.

I still need to make some final tweaks, as there is still a "..." menu somewhere that takes you to a "not implemented" screen. But I'm quite happy. Also, the material settings are things like print temperature, bed temperature, filament diameter, material flow and fan speed. You can adjust these, or select presets (and add presets later on, still need to finish that bit)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's too easy to leave the nozzle hot with the printer not printing and end up burning and sometimes getting a clog. Personally every 30 seconds I turn the "big extruder wheel" by hand to keep this from happening if the nozzle is hot.

It seems like there should be something similar. Perhaps the extruder should *always* be running when not printing - maybe at a very very slow speed. I don't know. I just know that going down 2 to 4 submenus is going to be a pain versus reaching over and spinning the "big wheel". 5 seconds versus .5 seconds. It adds up.

Also when I start a print, if I have recently primed the nozzle, all is fine, but if it has been 5 minutes and noone turned the "big wheel" then 3mm of "priming" before printing is not enough. So I usually turn the wheel just before I start a print.

Although I also increased the 3mm to 6mm in my start gcode (and slowed down the extrusion speed). So maybe it doesn't matter anymore.

- George

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My big wheel is hard to get to now so I hardly ever manually turn it. At the end of a print my GCode pulls the filament right back out of the heat. If I have to stop a print then I already go in and move the Z down with the ulticontroller so it's only 2 menu steps from there to turn the extruder back to my usual starting point. I prefer this method to manual now so I think everyone will get used to it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think UM2 XY is quieter because of the mounting and because of the material used. Wood makes for a great sounds board - think violin, guitar.

 

This helps, but the feeder is also a big noise factor of the UM-Original. And the noisy noisy fan...

But. I do have an almost silent modified UM-Original on my desk right now. TMC260 stepper drivers are awesome. But that's something for the far future.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This helps, but the feeder is also a big noise factor of the UM-Original. And the noisy noisy fan...

But. I do have an almost silent modified UM-Original on my desk right now. TMC260 stepper drivers are awesome. But that's something for the far future.

 

...and he is teasing again... :roll: :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daid is just providing information that there are better stepper drivers out there that are quieter.

I believe Eric Zalm is working on a whole new Marlin with all new hardware. Possibly including these newer steppers. He doesn't work for Ultimaker as this is probably more for the reprap community but I'm sure UM will jump on this as soon as it's "product worthy". In other words, a few reprap people will get it first, but eventually maybe it will be in the UM3D or maybe a UM Original PCB upgrade or UM2 upgrade. Who knows!

If you really need to know what the status is you should talk to him, not UM.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Our picks

    • Introducing Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta
      Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta is available. It comes with new features, bug fixes, and UX improvements. We would really like to have your feedback on it to make our stable release as good as it can be. As always, you can download the beta for free from our website, for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.
      • 95 replies
    • Print Core CC | Red for Ruby
      Q: For some users, abrasive materials may be a new subject matter. Can you explain what it is that makes a material abrasive when you are not sure which print core to use?
      A: Materials which are hard in a solid piece (like metals, ceramics and carbon fibers) will generally also wear down the nozzle. In general one should assume...
      • 30 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!