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Increasing build-plate temp. to 130-140oC


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Posted · Increasing build-plate temp. to 130-140oC

Hi Everyone, 

 

I have an Ultimaker Original.

 

I want to raise the build-plate temperature to around 130 degrees Celsius for a specific material.

The specs say that the temperature range is 70-100oC.

 

Have anyone raised the temperature higher and if so, how?

 

Thanks,

 

James

 

 

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted · Increasing build-plate temp. to 130-140oC

    Hi!

     

    The max temp you can set is actually 135°C I think - on the original firmware.

    But that doesn't mean that the bed can reach 135°C because it is just too weak.

    I think under normal conditions it will be about 110-120°C (after a long waiting time..).

    And only if you turn off the fans! If they are on the temp will drop dramatically.

     

    Things you can do to reach 130°C-140°C:

    1. insulate the bed somehow (put insulation material between the bed and the aluminium plate) - this will probably only give you 5-10°C higher temps on your bed

    2. raise the environment temp - this helps a lot (I built an heated chamber for my UMO+ that can reach 90°C - and I think I could easily reach like 150+°C on my bed). And I think nothing gets harmed when the temp is that high but I am not sure

    3. buy a new (230V) heated bed - probably the best idea. There are some beds that can reach 200°C. Then you also need another power supply but all in all not that expensive

     

    I hope this helps you,

    Chris

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    Posted · Increasing build-plate temp. to 130-140oC
    21 minutes ago, Christoph13524 said:

    ...

    2. raise the environment temp - this helps a lot (I built an heated chamber for my UMO+ that can reach 90°C - and I think I could easily reach like 150+°C on my bed). And I think nothing gets harmed when the temp is that high but I am not sure

    ...

     

    Most consumer electronic components are designed for a long-term maximum operating temperature that you can still touch, although barely, about 60°C. This is heat due to power dissipation in an environment of 25°C. Especially electrolytic capacitors, diodes, small transistors, chips, LEDs,... are sensitive. Power transistors and -amplifiers, and resistors, can usually withstand a lot more. Above that temperature the components usually don't die immediately, but their life shortens a lot. And power drivers need to be able to release their heat. I don't know about Ultimaker electronics, but I don't think they use military grade or dedicated high-temp electronics? So I don't think putting the whole printer in a heated cabinet is a good idea. I would suggest: heat the bed and print chamber, but keep all the rest cool: electronics, displays, drivers, power supplies...

     

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    Posted · Increasing build-plate temp. to 130-140oC
    4 hours ago, geert_2 said:

     

    Most consumer electronic components are designed for a long-term maximum operating temperature that you can still touch, although barely, about 60°C. This is heat due to power dissipation in an environment of 25°C. Especially electrolytic capacitors, diodes, small transistors, chips, LEDs,... are sensitive. Power transistors and -amplifiers, and resistors, can usually withstand a lot more. Above that temperature the components usually don't die immediately, but their life shortens a lot. And power drivers need to be able to release their heat. I don't know about Ultimaker electronics, but I don't think they use military grade or dedicated high-temp electronics? So I don't think putting the whole printer in a heated cabinet is a good idea. I would suggest: heat the bed and print chamber, but keep all the rest cool: electronics, displays, drivers, power supplies...

     


    I did not just put my printer into a cabinet but I totally modified my UMO so now it has a heated chamber. I have a water cooling and much more to make this work. 

    if you are interested..

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