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simmonsstummer

Glue stick

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I thought it was but I just finished a cookie cutter without glue and it stuck just fine. But yes pritt stick is what they are talking about. Staples finest is included with the UM2

 

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I did read here in the forum that faberdashery was a very good filament. I tried it... and I discovered that I do not need glue any more. Just with 60C for the glass bed.

Without glue the finish of the bottom surface is much better.

 

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I never noticed any improvement with glue stick. I'm printing PLA directly on the glass at 75°C. I found it sticking noticeably better than at 60°C.

 

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I'm printing PLA directly on the glass at 75°C.

In my experiments I found that 50c through 75c stuck exactly the same amount but below around 30C it doesn't stick as well.

However there is another advantage at 75C in that PLA stays above glass temp and is MUCH less likely to lift at the corners for large parts.

The disadvantage of 75C is that the bottom 3mm or so of the part gets pulled in on all corners. exterior corners are smaller (pulled inward) and interior corners are pulled outward. This is because the bottom 3mm or so of PLA never gets cold enough to be solid.

 

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In my experiments I found that 50c through 75c stuck exactly the same amount but below around 30C it doesn't stick as well.

However there is another advantage at 75C in that PLA stays above glass temp and is MUCH less likely to lift at the corners for large parts.

The disadvantage of 75C is that the bottom 3mm or so of the part gets pulled in on all corners. exterior corners are smaller (pulled inward) and interior corners are pulled outward. This is because the bottom 3mm or so of PLA never gets cold enough to be solid.

 

Off topic question, would it be better to print directly on paint tape in that case? I can understand that it's not everyone that is willing to damage the glass/spend lot of time taping.

I am curious to know which one does best at the end of the day.

We are planning to print really large parts that cover the whole printable surface.

I am talking about the PLA of course.

 

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I would say probably that heated glass is better than tape. But if you have no heat then tape is better than glass.

Also the lifting forces can be very strong so if they are too strong you have to get wider tape or the tape itself lifts.

So as long as you have a heated bed, use the glass. And if parts are still warping even after using brim feature and say 60C, then raise the temp to 75C. At 75C you will get some minor ugliness near the bottom of the part but at least it won't lift at the corners.

Another option is to print a "raft" although I have never tried that option with Cura. Raft is better developed in older technology printers I suspect. Such as makerbot. Raft is the older technology to prevent warping of corners. It worked pertty well but gave you very ugly bottom surfaces. Glass is the new method now that we are getting really good at sticking parts to glass.

 

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The original Staples brand glue stick that came with my U2 worked nicely for me. Cleanup was a breeze running under tap water. Loved it. However, when it came time to buy another stick at my local Staples store, they didn't have the same sized tube. I opted for two of the larger tubes that had the exact same label as the one from Ultimaker. These glue sticks were horrible and nothing like the one that came with my printer. The glue in these locally bought tubes dried almost instantly, without even the slightest tackiness. Even when the build plate temp got up to 75c~90c, it still wasn't tacky and my prints wouldn't stick. Just wasn't the same as the original glue stick.

That's when I decided to order a http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00L4RCTDE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1. So far, PLA sticks to the tape perfectly. Sticks almost too well as any warping can actually pull the tape up from the glass. Definitely don't put down tape on top of tape. It sticks well to the glass, but not so well to itself. Little side effect: The bottoms of my prints can have a fuzzy blue haze even after washing/scrubbing with soap and water.

ABS, on the other hand, doesn't seem to like my blue tape at all. Haven't gotten one ABS print to stick to it. A friend is bringing me some kapton tape so I can try that with the ABS. Can't wait to build a plexiglass cover and door so it retains heat during printing, hopefully cutting down on warpage. Almost never want to try ABS again :-|

 

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So I ordered Elmer's all purpose glue stick off Amazon and it works great for ABS (which didn't want to stick to my blue tape). I built an acrylic door for the front of my U2 and (for now) can place a cardboard box on top to create a heated enclosure (will convert to a proper acrylic cover soon). Not only have ABS prints stuck solid to the glue/glass (set to 110c), but they are not warping like before! I forgot and left the box on top and the door closed when printing something in PLA and it failed miserably because it got too hot for the PLA :oops:.

Anyway, just wanted to give a thumbs up for Elmer's all purpose glue stick.

 

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For pla & XT i print directly on heated glass, if its small stuff i use a brim.

I do use glue for colorfabb bronzefill, tried a few times but could not get this to stick to clean glass.

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Why would you want blue fragments and a rough surface on the bottom of your prints? Masking tape is a horrible solution compared to glue stick.

 

I have yet to have any PLA successfully stick to heated glass or heated glass with glue stick. My ABS sticks perfectly to the heated bed with glue. Blue tape is the only thing I've used that the PLA sticks to. My corners do not curl up one bit. That is why I use the blue tape. It's a bit of a pain that the blue fibers have to be scrubbed off and a little blue tint remains, but I'll take that over a warped print any day.

 

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3276003L  49598.1404205174.280.280

I'm telling you guys, spray this for 3 seconds into a folded paper towel, wipe onto glass like your cleaning the glass with it, and you're good to go with PLA...

It's $2.50 at any General Dollar store in the states. I've tried several brands...this is something totally different. I think it's so cheap, that it's just glue and propellant... no anti friz crap or perfumes... It even cleans the the glass, so no build up, as it dissolves any of the previous layers it touches.

I also no longer print with brim, I am able to lower the heated bed temp to reduce elephant footing, and I haven't had to clean the glass since I started using it. I have YET to have any corners lift.

I did find that it did not work that well with ABS, at least not as good as the slurry I usually use, but I have yet to find anything that works this good, and I doubt I ever will.

 

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You know, every time I've seen suggestions to use hairspray in the past, I imagine they meant to just spray it on the glass. I thought, "No WAY I'm spraying that stuff into the innards of my U2!" Imagine that gunking up my bearings and rods?! But now that you say to spray it onto a paper towel and act like you are cleaning the glass with it, that's different. I'll have to give it a try. I don't see myself keeping acetone around for making the slurry. The glue stick works fine with ABS for me with my covered chamber. But using a wipe-on hairspray for PLA sounds like it might be pretty cool. Not only easier to apply/remove than the blue tape, but much faster and no pattern on the bottom of my prints!

 

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Yeah, and it goes on thin, you still get that glass smooth look with no distortion like you can get with thicker glues or layers of hairspray... Just make sure you try THIS brand, just like the picture. Like I said, I've tried several brands of so-called "Maximum" hold hairspray , but there's just something different about this.

 

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I think the original way to apply hearspray was also to take the glass out, spray it outside the machine, and reinstall the glass ;)

I wonder what the baking spray does :p The butter replacement so to speak

 

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Hey guys, any recommendations on glue sticks in the UK to use? Pritt (from here in china, red tube) is useless. I'm heading home for a holiday and need to stock up.

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I have had little success with printing directly on to glass. Invariably parts would suffer from lift somewhere.

For PLA I have used cheap no-name brand glue stick which was fine for smaller parts at 65C. I tried UHU glue stick for PLA at 65C, and that was really good, but I experienced lift when I was too lazy to clean the plate and simply coated over the dirty stuff. The only drawback with UHU glue stick was that the parts would not come off easily after printing, I had to wait until the plate was cool, and for larger parts apply a large sideways force (i.e. hitting it with a plastic rod). The UHU stick glue was re-usable for at least a week, meaning that every Sunday I cleaned the glass with hot water and recoated.

For ABS (which I have been using exclusively now for the past month) I tried cheap glue stick, UHU stick, hairspray and ABS juice. The only thing that gives me consistent results is ABS juice. The drawbacks with that is that the juice comes off with the print, the plate has to be re-coated once there is no unused area left, plus cleaning the plate is a royal pain. All the old stuff has to be scraped off.

Applying juice is a little tricky. Using a brush means that the brush will becomes stiff once the juice dries. If you want to re-use the brush you have to soak it in acetone for a while. Also, using a brush does not result in an even coat. This is not really a problem, but it would be nice to have an easy-to-apply method that result in an even coat.

So currently I am trialling a very thin ABS juice (low ABS to acetone ratio) and I pour it onto the plate directly from the bottle. I move it around a little with an implement (or my fingers - but don't tell anyone) to make sure every part of the glass is wetted. Once that is done, I tilt the glass until the ABS juice sits evenly, and the surface tension is sufficient that it does not run over the edges and a fair amount of juice can be applied. It takes approximately 15 minutes to evaporate leaving a relatively even coat. I have a pump spray bottle that might make this process easier, but have tried it it since I do not know if the acetone will attack the bottle or the pump parts.

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