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drayson

Comparing Cura 13.04 / 13.06.4 / 13.11.2

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Hi everybody!

I have installed all of the above mentioned versions in parallel but have no idea if it is a good idea to do so... or if it is a good idea to switch always to the latest version...

So I´d like to raise a few short questions on that topic:

 

  • Which version do you prefer and why?
  • Do you change between versions depending on the task/model?
  • If yes, when/why?
  • Which benefits does each version have?

 

Maybe we could create something like a comparison chart?

@ Daid - could this also be usefull for your work or do you even have somthing like a comparison chart?

b.r.

drayson

 

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More information is always better. But what I usually need is examples. For example, if you report "13.04 retracts better then 13.06!" then I have nothing to go on.

If you on the other hand show pictures of prints with 13.06 and 13.11 with the same settings, and 13.11 strings more. And give the exact model you used. Then I can look into that.

You can get all the previous releases from http://software.ultimaker.com/?show=all

 

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Do you change between versions depending on the task/model?

 

Yes. But I almost always use the current latest version.

The "fix horrible" checkboxes are not always enough to fix a non-manifold STL and sometimes I can fix it in CAD but sometimes it is easier to slice with 13.04. That's the only reason I ever go back to 13.04 at this point.

Also I believe the Joris still prefers 13.04 for his cups because Cura 13.06 and newer I believe sometimes add little shelf like support on the layer below if the layer above will be printing "over thin air". But the joris/spiralize option on cura keeps getting better so I'm not sure about what Joris himself does at this point.

 

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Thank you for your replies - I had the impression that beside 13.04. there are several reasons for using the other versions too depending on the task (e.g. because of different support or infill strategies).

This was the initial idea behind the question.

I guess that there is somewhere a change log or something similar but my intention was to have something like a matrix version vs. feature to get an overview - maybe also with user notes...

13.04. 13.06.04 ....... 13.11.2

Slicer engine

Support strategies

"Joris"

Youmagine

...

and so on...

unfortuntely I´m not as deep in this topic as I whish to fill in such a list by myself :sad:

Anyway - thank you for your input!

 

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https://github.com/daid/Cura/blob/SteamEngine/changelog

Is the only official changelog there is right now. There has been a lot of changes between 13.06 and 13.11, and now there is a 13.12-test, with even more changes (that are listed under development)

13.04 was the last version with Skeinforge instead of the CuraEngine, so there you could find a lot of differences.

 

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Really there's 13.04 which was that most recent version with skeinforge, and then there is the current version. Unless there is a bug in the current version (which will likely get fixed in the next version) there is rarely a reason to use anything other than those 2 versions. However those 2 are different enough that 13.04 can be useful for some things.

For example 13.04 has other infill patterns such as hexagon infill.

 

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I looked into a test of triangles+hexagons as infill for Cura. However, there is a visual issue with this:

http://imgur.com/jQBKaPu

Would give you the strength of hexagons and triangles. Without adding the vibrations of the full hexagon infill. However, well, you'll most likely see the visual effect it creates.

(Also, it does not solve the "top warts" problem, which I am actually investigating)

 

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In my testing, ensuring adequate cooling was the key to getting rid of the bumps in the top surface. There's a photo I posted in George's visual troubleshooting thread.

How does Cura currently handle bridging layers? I think it does something different, because wasn't a recent version turning that on a bit too often...? But I'm not clear exactly what happens.

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Combing tries to keep the print head 'inside' the print during moves whenever possible. So for instance if you have a 'C'-shaped part that you are printing, it will move between the top arm of the c and the bottom one by tracing its way around inside the body of the C, rather than jumping across the gap.

This is a good thing in that it stops the head moving over exposed parts of the print unnecessarily, and so avoids any chance for the head to damage the finished surface by dropping a blob of plastic for instance. However, it currently has a couple of issues - firstly, it just has some flat out bugs that make retractions not happen when they should. Secondly, retraction is turned off for those internal moves, and than can lead to a lot of oozing inside the part which causes two problems: firstly, it can damage top and bottom surfaces by leaving a partial stripe of plastic that gets buried into the print, and secondly, the oozing can empty the print head, so that when it starts printing again, you get under-extrusion for a while.

 

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