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dbp123

Newcomer need some help please

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I am having some trouble with my printer

When I set the temperature in the control panel to 250 for pla it heats up fine, but when I start to print it starts to print ok for the first couple of layers of print but then it seems to stop extruding and if I go back to control panel the temp would have dropped back to about 150 which is causing the pla to clog up extruder

Is there a way to set the temp to stay at 250 as default

Hope someone out there can help

Dave

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1: don't heat up to 250 - that's too hot. I'm using 225 now, which works well on my machine. Starting with the machine cold, heat up to 230 and watch for plastic oozing out of the nozzle - a few (or maybe 10) degrees above the temperature that it starts doing that is a good place to start.

2: if you're slicing with skeinforge, check the Temperature module. For now, just set all the values to the same number.

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I'm not sure which settings cause it, but Skeinforge can put an M104 S0 somewhere at the start, this disables the heater at the start. Which is quite bad.

Printing PLA at 250C is a bit high, when I tried 250C it started to smell pretty bad. At 230C PLA flows like crazy, and at 190C you can print. So depending on the speed you want to print you can use anything in between.

People say that SkeinPyPy is pretty good:

https://github.com/daid/SkeinPyPy/downloads

(And I'm not just saying that because I made it :p)

SkeinPyPy assists you in upgrading to Marlin, which gives better print results. And all the defaults are fine and safe so you can start printing without any configuration tinkering really.

There is a bug in the Beta4, during the "First run wizard" in the final step, the heatup button does not work (Known and fixed for the next version)

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My favourite colour is the Robot Silver from Faberdashery. I've printed lots of things with it. I really should setup a gallery page too.... Or upload some pictures of my prints to Thingiverse. I too have a glow in the dark Yoda on top of my desk here at work... The force is strong with that one.

I also quite like the bling-bling gold actually.... In some lighting it looks like a dull orange colour, but when the light hits it right it can actually look like gold. One of my favourite prints so far is the Start Trek TNG communicator badge (thing 14345). I used NetFabb to slice it into two parts and printed the bottom oval part in Gold and the chevron in Robot Silver and glued them together. They were done at 0.02mm layer height. In the right light it looks just like the real thing.

I've printed a few things with Crystal Clear... Don't expect the results to look clear. I usually use it for things where the colour isn't important - like some transformer coil forms that I recently printed. When it extrudes a single thread is indeed crystal clear, and a single thin layer is completely transparent... but when you layer the plastic it becomes more of a translucent white because it's not homogeneous. This is what I expected from it anyway. It's still not a bad effect and can have some uses.

The most recent thing I printed was a stand of my own design for my Galaxy Tab tablet in Galaxy Blue. I'm not really that impressed with it. The aluminium particles don't really stand out too much. Basically, I think the blue isn't quite transparent enough for it to work well. I want to build a highly detailed USS Enterprise model in many parts and I was intending to use this to print the blue stripe of the engine nacelles in Galaxy Blue with LEDs inside. Not sure it will look as nice as I picture though.

I just uploaded snaps of some of the 3d printed things on my desk here at work:

https://picasaweb.google.com/102544598518008997408/3dPrints?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Cheers,

Troy

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