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championjc

Gcode modification

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What kind of modifications would it take to the Gcode in CURA to do multiple outer layers at a high detail layer height and a single fill layer to match the height of the outer layers?

Also what would it take to use the dual extrusion heads to do this? using the main head for the outer layers and the second head for the fill layers.

 

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In my opinion this is a big deal because those 2 outer layers do not "stack up" on top of each other so do you take the more "inner" layer? Or the higher layer as your contact for infill?

I think kisslicer might already do this and it has a nice gui just like Cura and it is free.

 

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Cura used to offer the option to do what you are suggesting, printing the outer wall in multiple smaller, identical passes, but many of us, including Daid (most importantly) weren't really convinced that it added much, and it definitely caused problems with some geometries. Generally speaking if what you want is the highest quality outer surface, you don't really want to be printing the outer perimeters and infill at different volumetric rates, because when the fast printed infill ends, and it slows down to printing the slower perimeter again, you're going to get oozing on the outer wall until the pressure equalizes.

On the other hand, I've seen others who really liked the feature. Maybe it helps for some specific use cases. But I don't think it will be coming back any time soon.

Actually slicing the perimeter and infill at different layer heights *might* be more useful, but it is still going to suffer from the speed differential issues, and there is some suggestion that it may be a patent-protected technique at this time.

 

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my expectation for this technique of printing was faster prints without losing quality on the outer surface and the ability to print the filler with natural colored filament and reduce the cost of each individual print. I'm starting to see where this technique would require a lot of specific changes to the Gcode, print speed, etc.

 

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Layer stacking is a pay-for-feature I'm afraid (one of VERY few features that are behind a pay wall).

 

It's not bad to pay for KISSlicer, he deserves some money for his hard work. And without Jonathan from KISS I would not have been able to make the engine behind Cura. He has given me some very good tips on getting stuff done. While the actual final method of getting things done in KISS and Cura are vastly different.

It's not a full-time job from Jonathan, it's just a hobby project which makes a tiny bit of money for him.

Or, in his words "if it would bring in some more money, I could buy a better printer" as he is still using an old BfB machine.

As for "different layer heights for infill and perimeter", I have some ideas on that how to do the old "skin" setting properly (just suddenly came to me!). So I might spend some time on it soon.

Different nozzles for "quick" and "detailed" parts are a whole different story... oozing on large nozzles is a big issue.

 

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I have the same 3mm nozzle on both heads. i just thought about running different layer heights between the two to get good detail on the visible part of the object but quick infill times. as well as using natural color pla for the infill rather than using up colored pla filament.

 

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I have the same 3mm nozzle on both heads

 

You mean .4mm nozzles?

 

the way i am thinking of it working is doing two or three layers of a shorter layer height in two or three rounds of the outer edge of the object then doing one layer for the infill of equal height to the outer edge.

 

Which outer edge? For a cube, fine, all three layers stack on top of each other but for most prints they don't. So which of the 3 outer edges do you run the infill to?

 

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Daid while we are talking about speeding up infill without hurting quality...

It would be nice if for those times when someone sets the infill speed at a different rate than the print speed, it would be nice if for the last 1 second worth of travel, or the last 50mm or something like that - it would be nice if it would gradually (or suddenly) switch back to the print speed. So that there isn't this bad quality the moment it changes speeds (typically over extrusion when it starts the skin again).

 

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Daid while we are talking about speeding up infill without hurting quality...

It would be nice if for those times when someone sets the infill speed at a different rate than the print speed, it would be nice if for the last 1 second worth of travel, or the last 50mm or something like that - it would be nice if it would gradually (or suddenly) switch back to the print speed. So that there isn't this bad quality the moment it changes speeds (typically over extrusion when it starts the skin again).

 

A very small retract at the start of the next skin layer would do the job (decrease pressure within the nozzle), wouldn't it? And the other way round: an additional amount of filament when starting the (fast) infill...

But shouldn't that not better be implemented in Marlin? Some kind of latency would have to be specified for that in the Marlin code...

 

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