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Printing with 3DKtop heat resistant filament – Material not listed in 'generic'


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Posted · Printing with 3DKtop heat resistant filament – Material not listed in 'generic'

Hello guys – first timer here :)

I want to print a heat resistant part out of 3dkTOP Material which is produced by a company in 3dk Berlin. The problem I have is that the material Station won't detect the material since it has no NFC Chip. I also tried to set it up manually but I can't find a 'generic Material' which resembles the 3dkTOP... According to the company the next closes thing seems to be ABS – should I set the the Material to ABS and then Modify the settings in CURA (250 print temp and 100 plate temp) for the print or is there a way to import a custom profile to the Material Station?

Kind regards,

Julian H.

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    Posted · Printing with 3DKtop heat resistant filament – Material not listed in 'generic'

    I'm not sure but that's what I would do - use generic ABS and modify the temps in the settings.  You probably will want to play with the fan also - you probably want the fan to be on but as low as possible.  On an S5 that's probably around 2 or 3% fan - I'd experiment as my printer seems to prefer a lower fan speed than most profiles I've seen for higher temp materials like 3dktop.

     

    However the material station complicates things.  A lot!!  The firmware for the material station/S5 combination likes to do a sort of "cold pull" when you are done printing.  This means it cools the core to an exact temperature and then has the feeder pull extremely hard until the filament pops out of the core.  The "cold pull temp" (it appears to be called "break temperature") might need to be different for ABS versus 3dktop.

     

    Just now I looked and I see it's in the material settings - this is from the material settings for ABS (table below) - it's called "break temperature" and is set to 85C which is scary low for ABS (and 3dktop) - I'd be tempted to up that to 100C.  The only way I know to edit is to export ABS and then edit the file and import it into a new material.

     

    I'd probably do a cold pull (look up how to do this - it involves removing the bowden tube) starting at 85C and slowly increase the temp - I'm guessing you get a nice pull around 100C for 3dktop - and then use that temp for the "break temperature".

     

    Then I'd just try it and if it gets stuck in the printer I'd just heat it up manually and pop off the bowden and pull it out that way but that's me - most people don't want to have to potentially take apart their material station!  I'm not afraid to do that.

     

    Anyway - maybe you should talk to your reseller about modifying the break temperature and ask them what to do if you can't get the material out after the print is over.  If they don't know anything about this then I would avoid 3dktop (or find a better reseller?).  Absolutely positively it's fine to remove and put back your bowden but taking apart your material station can violate your warranty if you don't get permission from your reseller first.

        <setting key="no load move factor">0.95</setting>
        <setting key="maximum park duration">7200</setting>
        <setting key="standby temperature">200</setting>
        <setting key="heated bed temperature">80</setting>
        <setting key="break preparation temperature">230</setting>
        <setting key="break preparation position">-16</setting>
        <setting key="break temperature">85</setting>
        <setting key="surface energy">70</setting>
        <setting key="break speed">25</setting>
        <setting key="break position">-50</setting>
        <setting key="end of filament purge length">20</setting>
        <setting key="end of filament purge speed">0.5</setting>
        <cura:setting key="material_shrinkage_percentage">100</cura:setting>
        <setting key="build volume temperature">36</setting>
        <setting key="print temperature">230</setting>
        <setting key="flush purge speed">0.5</setting>
        <setting key="anti ooze retract position">-4</setting>
        <setting key="adhesion tendency">0</setting>
        <setting key="flush purge length">60</setting>
        <setting key="anti ooze retract speed">5</setting>
        <setting key="break preparation speed">10</setting>

     

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    Posted · Printing with 3DKtop heat resistant filament – Material not listed in 'generic'
    5 hours ago, gr5 said:

    I'm not sure but that's what I would do - use generic ABS and modify the temps in the settings.  You probably will want to play with the fan also - you probably want the fan to be on but as low as possible.  On an S5 that's probably around 2 or 3% fan - I'd experiment as my printer seems to prefer a lower fan speed than most profiles I've seen for higher temp materials like 3dktop.

     

    However the material station complicates things.  A lot!!  The firmware for the material station/S5 combination likes to do a sort of "cold pull" when you are done printing.  This means it cools the core to an exact temperature and then has the feeder pull extremely hard until the filament pops out of the core.  The "cold pull temp" (it appears to be called "break temperature") might need to be different for ABS versus 3dktop.

     

    Just now I looked and I see it's in the material settings - this is from the material settings for ABS (table below) - it's called "break temperature" and is set to 85C which is scary low for ABS (and 3dktop) - I'd be tempted to up that to 100C.  The only way I know to edit is to export ABS and then edit the file and import it into a new material.

     

    I'd probably do a cold pull (look up how to do this - it involves removing the bowden tube) starting at 85C and slowly increase the temp - I'm guessing you get a nice pull around 100C for 3dktop - and then use that temp for the "break temperature".

     

    Then I'd just try it and if it gets stuck in the printer I'd just heat it up manually and pop off the bowden and pull it out that way but that's me - most people don't want to have to potentially take apart their material station!  I'm not afraid to do that.

     

    Anyway - maybe you should talk to your reseller about modifying the break temperature and ask them what to do if you can't get the material out after the print is over.  If they don't know anything about this then I would avoid 3dktop (or find a better reseller?).  Absolutely positively it's fine to remove and put back your bowden but taking apart your material station can violate your warranty if you don't get permission from your reseller first.

    
        <setting key="no load move factor">0.95</setting>
        <setting key="maximum park duration">7200</setting>
        <setting key="standby temperature">200</setting>
        <setting key="heated bed temperature">80</setting>
        <setting key="break preparation temperature">230</setting>
        <setting key="break preparation position">-16</setting>
        <setting key="break temperature">85</setting>
        <setting key="surface energy">70</setting>
        <setting key="break speed">25</setting>
        <setting key="break position">-50</setting>
        <setting key="end of filament purge length">20</setting>
        <setting key="end of filament purge speed">0.5</setting>
        <cura:setting key="material_shrinkage_percentage">100</cura:setting>
        <setting key="build volume temperature">36</setting>
        <setting key="print temperature">230</setting>
        <setting key="flush purge speed">0.5</setting>
        <setting key="anti ooze retract position">-4</setting>
        <setting key="adhesion tendency">0</setting>
        <setting key="flush purge length">60</setting>
        <setting key="anti ooze retract speed">5</setting>
        <setting key="break preparation speed">10</setting>

     

    Thank you so much! Your comment really helped a lot! 🙂 Print is in the works right now!

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