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daveholbrook

Printing Floor Plans - Settings help

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Hi,

 

I've had my Ultimaker 2 for around 3 months now and have only really printed small high quality models.

 

I'm about to print some floor plans (as shown in the image) and wondered if anyone had any experience in similar sort of prints and/or suggestions on what would be the best sort of settings for such a print.

 

I just wanted some advice as to what may be good settings for large thin/tall walled prints, to get me started on a first print and then I can adjust and tweak from there.

 

Floor Plans

 

Thanks,

 

David

 

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Hi David,

This is exactly what I'm doing these days, too.

Maybe, the thread here might help:

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/4319-prints-quality-improvements/

To make the long story short:

Speed: 50mm/s

Brim: Yes

Head: 240C

Layer: 0.1mm

Outer walls: 0.8mm

Flow: 80% - very important! Put it more, and you get underextrusion, dunno why.

Bed: 60C - do not get over this.

Filament: UM Blue.

The result: perfect, I'm happy! :D

Another precaution: you must carefully slice the model in Cura using Layers view and play with the advanced settings of "Fix horrible" in order to get the desired result.

Good luck!

 

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Hi Dave, for 1:200 scale I normally use 1.61 for my wall thicknesses. IE 4 times extruder width. I use Slic3r for slicing and if I specify 1.60 it only gives me 3 times extruder width!

If I start with a 1:100 scale then I use 3.22 so that if I do need to scale down to 1:200 then I can simply do that in the printing software and know the walls will be right.

Actually I tend not to do internal walls so I guess you could try 0.8mm for those and see how you go.

Generally I find that layer thickness of 200 microns is fine although sometimes I use 100, depends on the end requirements.

If you have no holes in the walls, eg windows, then you could start at 60m/s speed but if you do hav e windows then you will almost certainly need to drop down to 30 m/s or 20 m/s. Of course this will be influenced by the surface quality you need.

Temp. wise if I am running 200 microns at 30 m/s I will use 210 down to 200 depending on the PLA colour. At 60 m/s I would be using 220 temp.

At 1:200 scale I tend to turn off retraction.

If you do not care about what colour you use, Colourfabb's Dutch orange gives amazing right angled corners.

HTH

 

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... I normally use 1.61 for my wall thicknesses. IE 4 times extruder width. I use Slic3r for slicing and if I specify 1.60 it only gives me 3 times extruder width! ...

 

To get rid of this behavior, set the nozzle diameter to 0.39 and the issue is all gone. Please note that Slic3r use the extrusion widths to calculate the flow rates, hence this trick will not affect the printing parameters.

When you print objects with thick walls, there will be no problem to alter the wall thickness by 0.01 mm, but if they are thin (e.g. 1.6 mm!) you may end up with... 2 thinner walls :)

 

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