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Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question


Ayman1612

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Posted (edited) · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question, what is the function of the communication cable, what does it do, if I disconnect it, what happens?

 

58F84BA4-E661-4AE1-9050-66602CD65AD4.jpeg

Edited by Ayman1612
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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    The cable is needed to heatup the print cores, measure the temperature, switch the print cores, power for the fans.

    When you disconnect it your printer will not work anymore.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    Hey,

    I don't know if this helps but I have a list of components of the printcores here:

    https://github.com/Ultimaker/Ultimaker3/blob/master/BOM/subBOM Ultimaker Print Core AA 0.4.pdf

     

    There is a single fan in the front, and two radial fans at the side of the printhead. 

    https://support.ultimaker.com/hc/en-us/articles/360011527340-Check-the-Ultimaker-3-front-print-head-fan

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question
    2 hours ago, Smithy said:

    Thank you very much, you helped me a lot, I have one last question when to use filament 1.75 and when to use 2.85?

     

     

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    For your printer the UM3, you always use 2.85 filament.

    Other printers use 1.75, so it is depending on the printer itself.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    According to what I see, there is a heatsink and there is also a 25 watt cartridge heater, what is the difference in roles?

     

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    Is it possible to put 2 AA type nozzles?

     

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    Sure you can put 2 AA print cores in the printer.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    What is the difference between j (heatsink) and F (heater cartridge) what is the role of each of them? I would love to know and sorry if I dug you up

    2DF15F21-C8CE-4AD9-A898-7F25B1EFAF0C.png

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    I don't understand your questions or why you are asking about such things.

    But anyway....

    The heater cartridge heats up the nozzle to be able to melt the filament.

    The heatsink cools the upper part of the print core which is important that only the nozzle itself is hot.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    , thank you very much, last question and this is it, when do I use both nozzles together Aa and Bb??

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    You use both nozzles when you want to print with two materials  i.e. two colors.

    The BB printcore is only for PVA filament, which is a support material.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    For your first few 100 prints I recommend you try to stick with PLA only as that is the easiest material to print with and you will gain an understanding of what is dependable and what isn't.

     

    PVA is tricky as you need to keep it incredibly dry.  Some dessicant is not good enough.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question
    8 hours ago, Smithy said:

    You use both nozzles when you want to print with two materials  i.e. two colors.

    The BB printcore is only for PVA filament, which is a support material.

    What does support material mean? Like what is the role

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    You can't print over air.  Portions of a model that are less than about 30° from horizontal need support to print on.  Usually, that support is the same material as the print and so it can become welded to the print and requires later post-processing to get rid of the support and to finish the surface of the model where the support was attached.

    If you have a dual extruder printer then you can load a different material into one of the extruder/hot ends.  That "support material" won't stick nearly as well and is much easier to remove.  If you were to use PVA - it is water soluble and a good soak will get it off but as @gr5 points out it is fussy to keep in printable condition.

     

    If you you print a model with say PETG and the support material is also PETG then you will need to invest in a hobby knife (Exacto knife), a set of pics, and a good pair of needle nose pliers, to poke and prod and pull at the support to divorce it from the model.  A set of micro-files will help you to clean up the model.

    Here you can see the support is cyan colored.  On the right the Support Interface is a darker blue.  The center support is there for the roof of a blind hole and is tough to get out.

    image.thumb.png.e85e29765b3aef0c14b030110bf82957.png

     

    Here is my tool set.

    Not shown are the band-aids for use when the knife slips.  Also not shown is the extensive list of dual-purpose swear words for when either the knife slips or I accidentally cut off part of the model instead of the support.

     

    DSCN2976.thumb.JPG.a266012a46ff04abcc57b458d036c94a.JPG

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question
    19 minutes ago, GregValiant said:

    You can't print over air.  Portions of a model that are less than about 30° from horizontal need support to print on.  Usually, that support is the same material as the print and so it can become welded to the print and requires later post-processing to get rid of the support and to finish the surface of the model where the support was attached.

    If you have a dual extruder printer then you can load a different material into one of the extruder/hot ends.  That "support material" won't stick nearly as well and is much easier to remove.  If you were to use PVA - it is water soluble and a good soak will get it off but as @gr5 points out it is fussy to keep in printable condition.

     

    If you you print a model with say PETG and the support material is also PETG then you will need to invest in a hobby knife (Exacto knife), a set of pics, and a good pair of needle nose pliers, to poke and prod and pull at the support to divorce it from the model.  A set of micro-files will help you to clean up the model.

    Here you can see the support is cyan colored.  On the right the Support Interface is a darker blue.  The center support is there for the roof of a blind hole and is tough to get out.

    image.thumb.png.e85e29765b3aef0c14b030110bf82957.png

     

    Here is my tool set.

    Not shown are the band-aids for use when the knife slips.  Also not shown is the extensive list of dual-purpose swear words for when either the knife slips or I accidentally cut off part of the model instead of the support.

     

    DSCN2976.thumb.JPG.a266012a46ff04abcc57b458d036c94a.JPG

    If I understood correctly, I can make a support with a material other than pva, but it will be difficult to hide the support later?

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    Support is always waste material, which is meant to be removed after the print is finished.

    With single extruder printers (only one nozzle), it's the same material as the "main" print, with dual extruder printers (like the UM3, two nozzles), you can chose a different material for support, like PVA, which is water soluble (so you just can submerge your finished print in a bucket of water and after some hours the support is gone itself), or breakaway, which has to be removed manually, but is easier to remove than normal print materials.

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    How do I define where I want support?

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    Cura does support mostly automatically.  It's more that you tell cura where you *don't* want support.  Cura is somewhat smart about positioning the support but sometimes makes dumb decisions.  The first level of control is that you can select "support everywhere" or "no support" or "support touching buildplate".  With the last option it won't put support in holes half way up your model but will suport things that have only air under them.

     

    Also you can set the support angle. overhangs at 45 degrees are trivial to print.  As the support angle gets steeper, it is more likely you need support.  I like to skip support up to around 80 degrees (where 90 degrees is a horizontal surface).  So that's a setting in cura you can mess with and see what happens in PREVIEW mode.

     

    There are fancier features like "support blocker" where you can click on areas of the model where you don't want support.

     

    As was mentioned above, if you do a single nozzle print, you have to remove the support later and it scars the surface.  It's this ugliness that people tend to hate about support.  With dissolvable support you can have perfect looking overhangs.

     

    95% of my prints don't need support.  I design my own parts so I can usually think of a way to avoid support.  Also you don't need support for "bridging".  Think of printing the wall of a house with a doorway.  The top of that doorway doesn't need support (cura thinks it does, but it doesn't).  Because it can print the layer at the top of the door opening by stringing filament straight over the opening.  This doesn't work if the door isn't square and has a crooked top.  I'm sure you don't understand my previous sentence - you need to just start printing things and learn and then this makes more sense.

     

    Here's a guide that is more visual, less words, and will help you understand and it's extremely easy and quick reading (spend like 10 minutes!) - skip down to the part that says "create a span" and now my above paragraph makes more sense:

    http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/38-designing-for-3d-printing

     

    These other 2 guides are also worth reading some day

    http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/23-a-visual-ultimaker-troubleshooting-guide
    http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/30-getting-better-prints

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    Do you have a page or something else that explains each part of a 3D printer and what its role is like the motor belts, how the head of the printer moves, such an explanation page. As if knowing each part of its role

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    Posted · Hello, I am new to 3D printers, I have a question

    For first orientation, you could try this:

    https://support.ultimaker.com/hc/en-us/articles/360013053880-Ultimaker-3-PDF-manuals

    the site also contains a lot of information and possibly is exactly what you're looking for.

     

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