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Bronzefill Pirate Coin

My first print in Bronzefill, tried various polishing techniques but settled for fine grain sand paper (240 grit), rotating brass wire brush with a dremel on low speed and finally Autosol polishing paste with a rag.

The aged look is accomplished with applying a layer of black spraypaint and instantly afterwards try to wipe as much paint as possible off with a rag, this is done right before the final polishing.

 

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Targeter - fantastic print!

What is not printed in this model? Would love to try and print it myself. ;)

 

The tracks are assembled by 1x15mm nails

The axles for all wheels and rollers are either 3.3mm or 1.6mm stainless welding rod

M3 bolts and nuts for the turret

Lots of loctite precision glue :wink:

 

@Didier.. haha Great video! Is that your wife, girlfriend? How did a geek like you catch such a pretty thing :p:p

@Targeter Cool little models, how many parts per the tank?

 

Im not sure of the exact parts count, the tracks are like 180 links or so each, and the tank itself is 40-50 individual parts.

 

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Thanks, i really love how it came out, this filament behaved just as good as i hoped it would to buffing and aging, it is very cool since i could hand this print to people and most of them can not tell that it was 3D printed.

 

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Filaflex :)

Printed at 235º/60º.

0.1mm layers, 30mm/sec.

When printing the bottom I noticed some underextrusion so I upped the flow to 102% and the speed to 90% (so actually it printed at +27mm/sec)

 

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My first print in Bronzefill, tried various polishing techniques but settled for fine grain sand paper (240 grit), rotating brass wire brush with a dremel on low speed and finally Autosol polishing paste with a rag.

The aged look is accomplished with applying a layer of black spraypaint and instantly afterwards try to wipe as much paint as possible off with a rag, this is done right before the final polishing.

 

i love this.. is is the simple moment where i do admit to myself.. why did i never think of something that simply and brilliant.

really love it !!!

Ian :-)

 

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I finally got a chance to test out a first filament of Faberdashery from a dozen of 10-20m samples I ordered the other day. Printed out like a charm.

Like some would say:

 

It prints like butter

 

So I made a little something for my daughter. Go some pony on Thingiverse.

IMG 20140724 212555

 

I made the supports in Meshmixer and saved 30 minutes of printing (and no it didnt take me 30 min to do them :p)

 

removing support left some marks

IMG 20140724 212607

IMG 20140724 212616

 

So I thought of Skint that soldered 2 filaments together to finish a print and used my soldering iron to simply smooth the surface a bit while it was heating up and got them almost completely out. Its the first time I try this and it worked pretty nicely.

IMG 20140724 213051

IMG 20140724 213103

 

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@pm_dude I use a really simple 5 step process. I know 5 steps sounds like a lot, but it's a fast, simple and clean way to make a mesh from a logo and print it. I use illustrator and 3ds Max. Other modeling packages might be compatible with illustrator files, but I'm not sure.

1. I start with finding a nice high res jpg image of the desired logo I want. This works best with uncomplicated logos like the coca cola one. Lower res images work ok too, but I try to find the highest resolution so I don't have to clean up the logo in illustrator or max.

2. Next I open up the file in illustrator, click on the image once and live trace will appear at the top. Hit the live trace button once. There are settings you can mess with while using live trace, but I always just use the default. With a high res image, the default settings usually outline the logo flawlessly.

3. Save the image as and .ai file, but make sure to use legacy and select illustrator 8. I have found this works the best for importing into max.

4. Import the illustrator file into 3ds max. You now have a flat spline that you can ad an extrude modifier to.

5. Once you extrude your logo in max , you can export as an .stl file or further edit it in max i.e. adding a back to a logo that has letters that would fall apart when printing.

6...I think all of us know what to do with the .stl file next lol.

I use this as a simple way to make fun prints to give to people. I love printing these because they end up being flat and thus unlikely to fail as easily. Also since the process is so easy, I can be printing almost almost any logo I want within a few minutes.

 

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