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Slow slicing


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Posted · Slow slicing

Hi!

I bought a new computer today with Windows 8. First I encountered the problem with not being able to download Arduino drivers. I used this guide: http://mytechblog.com/tutorials/arduino/install-arduino-drivers-on-windows-8/

Using Cura (14.03) is really slow now. It takes a really long time for models to get ready. At first I thought it was stuck but saw that it moves really slow. Is this a Windows 8 related problem? Is this because my new & cheap computer sucks? Or is it some kind of bug?

This is the computer:

 

http://uk.hardware.info/productinfo/200656/asus-r512ca-sx134h#tab:specifications

http://www.mediamarkt.se/mcs/product/ASUS-R512CA-SX148H,90952,510478,973317.html?langId=-16

 

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    Hmmm... I don't know about today's Celeron processors but some time ago they were just a nightmare. I think slicing requires some computing power. I would go for an i7 or at least an i5... Daid certainly knows more about minimum requirements...

     

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    It takes a really long time for models to get ready.

     

    Which step is slow? The part where it does the little progress bar up under the icon near the top of the screen? Or the part where it loads layers and does the "10% complete" progress text? Or is the model not even visible for a long time? Or something else?

     

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    There are so many different versions of Intel processors, that it can be difficult to compare them. But as a rule of thumb, celerons are the slowest processor familly, then comes the i3, the i5 and the fastest would be the i7.

    Further, the U at the of the number means "ultra low voltage". These processors are made for netbooks and small notebooks. They use less power but they are also much slower than non U processors.

    So basically you got the slow version of the slowest processor familly....

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    The "Save toolpath" between "Load" and "Share on Youmagine". The progress bar is really slow.

    Loading the layers goes fast, just as fast compared to another computer that doesn't have any problems with the "Save toolpath" loading. Could it be something with drivers not properly installed?

    Just saw znib's respons. I guess you get what you pay for :) I had to buy a computer pretty urgent and didn't want to pay too much.

     

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    Only Daid can tell for sure, but if save toolpath really just saves what is already calculated to the disk, I would not expect it to cause much load on the CPU. So maybe there is another problem, not the processor. I'm just guessing, but maybe you have a virus scanner running which slows down disc access?

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    Save Tool Path is the same as save gcode and requires that the model be sliced before it is enabled.

    I believe slicing requires a lot of floating point calculations and that is something the Celerons are not particularly good at..

     

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    Wow! I guess it just needed some sleep & love because now the Save toolpath loading is fast! I'm baffled!

    Edit:

    And I did try to restart the computer before, like 3 times.

     

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    I use a 2 year old Dell workstation laptop with Intel I7, win7 pro and 16GB Ram. Cura slicer use only 3GB and about 10% cpu..

    It´s not a big problem but I often wondered why

     

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    I guess it doesn't use more than 3GB because it simply doesn't need more. :-)

    And the reason it only uses 10% CPU is because the slicer is probably single threaded. An i7 normaly has 8 logical cores (4 physical cores with hyperthreading). A single threaded program can only run on one of those 8 cores, the other 7 are sleeping. So the theoretical maximum for its CPU load would be 12.5%

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    Posted · Slow slicing

    Cura uses a single thread to do all it's math. And is CPU/Cache bound.

    What does this mean? Simple. The cheaper the CPU, the slower Cura is in preparing the model. In general, newer generations CPU, more GHz, and more Cache help in getting it faster.

    More cores won't do anything. With 1 exception, 2 cores help in making the GUI more responsive, as the GUI runs in a different thread.

    Note that speed is relative. This laptop seems to have about the same CPU specs as my old WinVista laptop. It's not that slow to prepare, but for big models it can take a while. Still, it's faster then the 10+ minutes we where waiting 1.5 year ago :smile:

     

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