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3D Scanner inside the printer

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I'm thinking of a 3D Scanner inside the printer that can be used in the Ultimaker Original and Ultimaker 2.

Something like David's Scanner http://www.david-3d.com/

Things needed:

- turntable with a stepper motor that can be placed on the bed

- bracket that holds a camera and a laser

- software or modified firmware to lift the bed step by step while scanning

(- background with dots)

Of course the turntable and bracket has to be quickly removable when you want to print

What do you think of the pro's and con's of a setup like that?

Pro's:

-easy construction

-high resolution scanning possible (I think)

- cheap

-....

Con's:

- limited volume that can be scanned

-....

I would like to see your comments

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Love the idea! Some parts could even be printed if accuracy allows for it. I'm in for working on this one!

@cons: volume is limited, but if you pick the parts so that it could also be mounted outside of the frame(i.e. design/sell a bigger housing) than you have both the easy and cheap, and the larger stuff!

 

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Depends on your definition of high resolution. With a laser in most situations you will get an accuracy of about 0.5 to 1 mm, unless you start using high end (industrial) lasers & camera's.

Cons:

 

  • Every time you move the scanner from your printer, you will have to re-do the calibration process. This can take about 5 minutes.
  • With no moving laser, there are large parts that are 'un-scanable'
  • The printer is white. Which is the worst color for 3D scanning background ever.
  • It's not that cheap. You will need a decent camera (100-150 euro), a laser bandpass filter (80 euro), a semi decent laser (20 ish euro) and a rotation platform (20-50 euro).
  • Distance of the camera to the to-be scanned object is small, which forces you to use cameras with a large angle, which tend to have a lot of fish eye effect. This is killing for your quality.

 

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I don't understand why you want to put it inside the printer...

The turntable can stand everywhere (no size limit there), the calibration panel is just 2 panels at a 90 degr. angle, so they will stand by themselves and are easy to store. The camera can be on a tripod..

You will have to buy the software anyway.

 

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The idea is if you put it inside the printer 1)you can make use of the bed, so you can let it go up 1 step at the time, so you can make accurate scans

2) you can put a black cloth over it so you have a dark box to scan in.

3) by using the case of the Ultimaker you can make the bracket and turntable removable but mount it in a way the parts are always at the same position. Making it easier to calibrate.

But maybe I'm wrong. The whole scanning stuff is new to me.

About the background: you can make a black cardboard or plastic background

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The idea is if you put it inside the printer 1)you can make use of the bed, so you can let it go up 1 step at the time, so you can make accurate scans

2) you can put a black cloth over it so you have a dark box to scan in.

3) by using the case of the Ultimaker you can make the bracket and turntable removable but mount it in a way the parts are always at the same position. Making it easier to calibrate.

But maybe I'm wrong. The whole scanning stuff is new to me.

About the background: you can make a black cardboard or plastic background

 

So... you mount it in a box? Little reason why it needs to be an Ultimaker. Ikea has lots of cheap options that would fit better. The UM casing is also a bit small for a scanner.

(The bed has little added value, as moving up/down moves you out of the focus or visible range of the camera)

 

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Maybe a 3d-scanner inside the printer could be used (somwhere in the future) to monitor the printing.

It could detect failed prints where you get rat-nests, shifting, clogged nozzle and similar problems to stop the print.

With really high resolution you could detect underextrusion, too?

 

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Yes, but it's not a trivial thing to do. I'd put my money with 'ordinary' computer vision algorithms if you want that sort of stuff.

All 3d scanning algorithms have several tradeoffs; Complexity, robustness, number of frames required, processing time, accuracy and resolution.

In order to get scans that are good enough to detect under extrusion, you would need a pretty awesome resolution and accuracy. It would also need to be extremely robust, as false positives / negatives are a big no-no. This usually means that you require either a ton of frames and/or a ton of processing time and or huge complexity. But then again, even a ton of frames is kind of a no-no, and the same can be said for a ton of processing time, leaving only one thing to be unoptimized; The complexity.

 

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And it won't scan all area's of the model visible to the camera. The results would be far better with a projector (or rotating laser, but that creates a whole range of extra problems)

 

With the use of the turntable I think the only side that is not scanned is the underside. But I think that will always be a problem...

 

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