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Holy C#*P! and now?


simmonsstummer

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Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

my recommendation would be to take off the fanguard and see if you can disassemble the hotend. if you are lucky, only the heaterblock has the filament attached to it. if you can dissasemble it to the heater block, take it outside and use a gas burner to burn away all the plastic. if you cannot, heat up the nozzle and use something to pry away the plastic until you can take it apart.

 

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    As said, take the fans away it's very simple. You might need to heat up a bit the nozzle.

    Then heat the nozzle, and take away the melted PLA (I guess it's PLA) with whatever you can (putty knife, screws etc..) clean as much as possible, the you might need to take the whole heater apart (be carefull with the temp sensors!)

    Here's a video showing how to:

     

    Take your time and clean as much as you can, it will be ok but will need some work and patience :)

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    great video. too bad i already unmounted the nozzle several time so i know how to operate but the video is great. Is there any way to clean the part that hold the nozzle for pla like you do it in acetone for abs?

     

     

    use a gas burner to burn away all the plastic

    like the cooking burner of something less?

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    It looks bad, but if you heat up the head, and then take off the fanguard,

    you might be able to peel the softening PLA off,

    and you might be better of with a heat gun, instead of a hot flame, a flame will be too local, and a heat gun more spread out, and more controllable

    the trick is to get the PLA soft, and not melted, when it's soft you can peel and scrape it off

    please show more pics when you take it apart, we might be able to help and prevent permanent damage.

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    Ok it was simpler than i imagined it.

    Now this is the situation:

    gallery_20815_489_892862.jpg

    If you look at the close image, you can see the problem i showed even in another topic:

    http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/7553-ultimaker-2-never-fill-well-the-tops/?p=71510

    I can only imagine that the nozzle is still a little dirt.. so..

    What i would like to do now is to clean completely the nozzle with something.

    I have an heat gun and i'll definetely make a try. In the topic above gr5 told me:

     

    You can remove the nozzle and put the entire thing in a flame to carbonize anything left in there.

    So i was curious about what kind of flame.

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    That doesn't look as bad :)

    my nozzle would look the same on my UM1 when they still had the older nozzle, that was prone to leaking,

    I usually wiped that away with a cloth when the head was heated up.

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    So i was curious about what kind of flame.

     

    I used the gas flame from a cook stove. Leave it in long enough to turn the plastic black but not much longer. As you say, don't melt the brass. There is a large temperature difference between burning plastic and melting brass so it's not too difficult. Just don't leave it in there and fall asleep.

    I moved my nozzle into the flame for no more than 10 seconds at a time. Then moved it out and touched some filament to the outside to gauge the temperature.

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    Happy new year to all of you!

    To bad my printing year is not started i i wanted...

    after:

    gallery_20815_489_605448.jpg

    gallery_20815_489_1714252.jpg

    gallery_20815_489_476825.jpg

    gallery_20815_489_71482.jpg

    i mounted all again with a great hope. Everything was clean and nice so the printing should have been excellent...

    but.. today.... again underextrusion...again weird skew filament out of the nozzle...

    gallery_20815_489_173944.jpg

    gallery_20815_489_107757.jpg

    and the print test was:

    gallery_20815_489_174685.jpg

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    I encountered the same situation with a previous failed print that left 1/16" of plastic coated around my print head. I am posting my chosen way of cleaning as a warning to avoid doing the same.

    I used a Dremel tool with a soft wire brush on lowest speed to clean the head and surrounding metal. It worked beautifully! The head looked brand new and all of the plastic was removed. However, after a few days of printing again, I noticed my surfaces were not nearly as smooth as before. I guess I inadvertently reshaped the nozzle around the opening and made it slightly rounded, like a ball point pen. This resulted in the laid down plastic forming teeny tiny concave troughs, almost like the grooves in a vinyl record, rather than flat lines.

    I tried using a fine, flat file and scraped across the bottom of the nozzle to flatten it back out. That seems to have worked. It may be a micron or two too wide because of the outer vertical slope of the nozzle, but my print surfaces are back to being smooth again.

    If I ran into the same situation again, I would probably just heat up the head and wipe away the excess plastic with a cloth while wearing an oven mitt or something. I'm keeping everything abrasive away from the head from now on!

     

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    Posted · Holy C#*P! and now?

    It would take a lot more heat than the flame from a gas stove to melt the nozzle - remember the whole piece would have to reach that temp at the same time to start the melting process and it's way too thick for that. And using the brass wire attachment on the dremel is good advice, although I would use a hand brass brush instead as its less fierce. Also, you could make a small acid bath to get rid of burnt debris on the nozzle. I am a jeweller and that is how we get rid of soldering flux etc after heating. We call the acid used 'safety pickle' - it's very weak sulphuric acid and can be kept in a ceramic slow cooker at a low constant temperature. Go to a jewellery supply store, they should be able to help. This will definitely get rid of any soot etc, after heating the nozzle and burning out the filament.

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