Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts

Recommended Posts

As many of you already use Robert's great feeder:

 

I thought it would be a good idea to collect feedback in one place.

Here is mine:

I have a newer UM2 which uses a very strong feeder spring. In oder to use Roberts feeder one has to use a 35mm M3 screw with it. With a 30mm screw you'd have too much tension on the spring and a 40mm screw is too long an would touch the ball bearing.

One thing is weird though. I tried quite a few variations of spring tension but I am unable to have the feeder stepper spring back when there is too much back pressure. It always grinds filament.

Interestingly my problem with top surfaces on objects got worse with the new feeder which is weird because the feeder is great in so many ways.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think each printer is its own beast, as I have no issues now with grinding after this upgrade.

I have had different small issues, but fixed them.

With the screws I just bought new ones and cut them as required. On the tensioner, I had to make a countersink as it was rubbing against the back of the machine.

I had an issue with wear, where the filament enters into the feeder. I had a small round smooth insert, and placed in and it fixed this :). and if it wears again I can just print a replacement and pop back in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...

I tried quite a few variations of spring tension but I am unable to have the feeder stepper spring back when there is too much back pressure. It always grinds filament.

Interestingly my problem with top surfaces on objects got worse with the new feeder...

...

 

Mmmmhhh, i have only made positive experiences with the feeder.

According to this: Don't Over-tighten the Material Feeder!!!

there could be a correlation between these two issues.

You certainly have noticed that |Robert| has uploaded several variations of the yoke in several lengths.

A shorter yoke helps to reduce the spring tension and this has potentially positive effects to the consistenty material transport.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At some point I made the yoke too long, it might be what's causing the issue. Also, the spring in older machines are stiffer than the newer machines. Unless they've gone back to the stiffer spring again with the latest iteration of the feeder which showed up recently.

I think the feeder is good, does that count as feedback? :p

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not complaining... I love it and I will keep using it.

I am using the shorter yoke, the longer one would press the ball bearing too hard against the knurled bolt (at least with the spring and screw that I have here).

My UM2 is roughly 3 months old (it had the semi-old feeder without a metal grommet).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I Like that feeder a lot.

 

I just added a filament guide to the yoke because I sometimes have the filament sliding out of the bearing.

IMG 20141201 231255

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/um2-iroberti-s-feeder-v6-yoke-and-hub-with-guide

 

I dont know why but it didn't fit on every UM2. Could be due to the long yoke.

 

Edit:

I can't find M3 screws easily around here so I use these instead:

one 6-32 5/8" for the bearing

one 6-32 1 1/2" with bolt for the sprint tension. I have to loose the holes a little and the bolt doesn't fit the design hole but fit between the yoke arms.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, I am new to this forum and a new UM² owner. I printed with it for about 10 hours now and don't see any issues with grinding filament (stock feeder). So I'm not sure I want to dismantle my printer if it works well with something I don't know will work :-) I bought the printer from someone and has a total of 270 print hours.

In what material should the new feeder be printed? I have ABS, PLA and XT

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never change a running system ;)

You can print the feeder in any material you want. PLA is pretty sturdy for example. Since there is no need for high temperature resistance, you don't need ABS or XT (which are harder to print with compared to PLA).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some expierence with 3D printing since I had (and still have) a k8200 for over a year. I just asked the material choose because the original feeder is ABS I believe and this one gets small particles into the bowden after some time. Maybe PLA is more resistant to this "grinding" wear of the filament against the feeder.

I find XT very easy to print, I don't have more issues with XT then with PLA. I don't have allot of printing time/experience on ABS.

But yeah like I said I don't see any issues so far with the original feeder (yet). But maybe I should print the parts already for when it starts to act up, then I have the replacement parts at hand :-)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never change a running system ;)

You can print the feeder in any material you want. PLA is pretty sturdy for example. Since there is no need for high temperature resistance, you don't need ABS or XT (which are harder to print with compared to PLA).

 

I would advice against printing the body (any feeder part that comes in contact with the fillament) with XT or ABS, just print in PLA so in case you ever do get some wear, you'll only end up with poluting particles of pla (low melt point) in you bowden/hotend. This is ofcourse less likely when you use the little piece of bowden in the bottom of roberts design.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beginner here. I had UM2 for about a month, so my experience/knowledge is not so great.

Few days ago I swapped to Robert's feeder hoping to solve underextrusion which is progressively getting worse.

1. I definitely like the "openness" of the design. Much easier to clean, to see what is going on and to insert filament. Especially for beginners this is a ++++++.

2. I am still trying to find the correct tension for the spring/length of yoke. I am getting a lot of feeder-stepper-clicking when trying to print faster. 35mm long screw may be the answer to reduce the tension further (thanks Niko).

I never touched the tension on the original feeder and currently it is (still) performing better than Robert's feeder on the extrusion test (also less clicking with the stock feeder).

3. One thing that I keep fighting with is the position of the tension adjustment screw. I am using a pan-head screw and it is difficult to squeeze a screwdriver into position due to the spool holder. Yes, I know the position can't be changed easily, I will need to look for a screw with a different head :-)

Hopefully I will be able to tweak the tension more to improve the performance further.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think its really required for UMO is it, as is much of a muchness. UMO is easy load, there are also no temperature issues as the stepper is separate. I was under the impression for flex need a little oil in the bowden, or direct drive conversion if you run into issues.

Note, i may be wrong about this as i'm relatively new to printing!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most importand reason to use Robert's feeder is that it does not grind itself into small bits of black plastic that wind up in the extruder and put black specks into the prints before causing nozzle clogs.

The OEM Ultimaker 2 feeder is a total POS.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really dislike contaminating the bowden cable with oil.

 

It's not a problem. First of all you shouldn't need oil with "flex pla" but you *do* need it with rubbery materials like ninjaflex. The oil doesn't make the print look any different. Any light mineral oil will work. You can not tell the difference in the print. The oil doesn't make the print different - it just makes it easier for the filament to slip through the bowden.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 1 reply
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!