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OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

In 1990 I was using Autocad on DOS (before windows). I know that product line is not obsolete because I bought some items from that same company about 6 months ago. The Autocad data, however, is obsolete. The sent me a solid model. Running that same DOS based Autocad on my current computer (too fast) would be a chore. Point being, data progresses.

My hunch is CAD will move towards a more standardized format. The company with the most users will set the standard. OS has a pretty good model to get lots of users. I would be more worried about using Solidworks.

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Zumfab

Here is a link to Onshape FAQs Read what they have to say about security. I think you will find it interesting.

Dave

https://www.onshape.com/faqs

 

I do not see anything about server location, jurisdiction and applicable laws or actual talk about forms of security in there. They have a great story, but without any substatiation I cannot imagine trusting a company with valuable and vital company data like that.

For the rest I agree with gr5. Nothing more fickle than internet companies. Cloud companies are great when they work and do what they are supposed to do. When things go awry, they can be your worst nightmare. People love the cloud, but generally seem to overlook the consequences and risks that go along with the concept. You are not a buyer any more, you are renting. This means that sooner or later, the services you pay for will end without any control over them. You are not a buyer any more, you are renting.

Banks are easily accountable when they lose your money, unless something major happens. This, I am not too sure. Running a healthy business is about taking some risks, while mitigating others to an acceptable level, but adding single points of failure does not seem wise.

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Zumfab I'm guessing you are going to stay with your current CAD software and keep paying you annual maintenance. I'm also guessing that you do thousands of Euros in CAD billing every year. This program is not for everyone.

I am a retired hobby machinist that just has fun designing model marine propulsion systems for RC model tug boats.I don't have thousands of dollars wrapped up in CAD software. I do pay $300 per year maintenance for the CAD program I use the most.

If Onshape does all they are talking about on there website and on there forum they can save me that $300. There are a lot of things I can already do with Onshape that I can not do with the CAD program I use the most.

Yes there are risks with using a cloud based program. I accept these risks because I will never have hundreds or thousands of CAD drawings at risk

From the number of users I see on the forum I think there a large number of people that are also willing to take the risk and some of those people are power CAD users.

Dave

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Zumfab I'm guessing you are going to stay with your current CAD software and keep paying you annual maintenance. I'm also guessing that you do thousands of Euros in CAD billing every year. This program is not for everyone.

 

I am just trying to understand the qualities, risks and limitations of this alternative :) Any new service deserves a good hard look, so anyone interested can take an informed decision.

You are right, by the looks of it and the information that we have so far it is probably not for me. Though I do think I might suggest it to a friend, as my priorities and preferences are not those of everyone. As long as you are aware of what you are getting into, why not?

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Hmmmm. Created an account to try this particular 'offering' despite having a complete eversion to any design process which is "cloud based" as you're utterly beholden to the providers future whims, despite their glowing startup promises, your internet connection and their implementation over it, to provide a fluid working environment compared with software running locally. The two just do not tally.

Essentially, anything "cloud based" read - 'on other peoples remote computers via the internet' - can never be as easy and as quick as something running locally on your own machine.

But. I am interested to see how 'agreeable' their particular take on CAD is, given their pedigree and given there is no 'standard' for CAD, just each manufacturers particular take on how they think CAD should be implemented. Just like each manufacturer has their own take on how schematic capture and pcb layout software should be done. If it's intuitive and easy to get going with, I'd suggest they offer something stand alone and not "cloud based"

First impressions, having logged in just now, I suspect I'll probably quite quickly junk this particular offerring, but I'm willing to prod and poke it a while longer until (I suspect) it will eventually completely irritate the heck out of me. I'm happy to be proven otherwise, but I doubt that'll happen. I just so do not like the idea of any "cloud based" design for so many reasons. :smile:

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Essentially, anything "cloud based" read - 'on other peoples remote computers via the internet' - can never be as easy and as quick as something running locally on your own machine.

 

I disagree. They can tweak both hardware and software. They are experts. I am pretty good, but I am not an expert. They can also afford much better hardware.

+There is only one hardware and software vs what ever hardware/version of software the user is using in a traditional CAD offering. Therefore, you don't need an army of tech support folks.

But I do like ur attitude. Let us know how it goes. The above is all in theory. :)

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Zumfab

Here is a link to a webpage where Onshape details there security. https://www.onshape.com/security

I found it interesting, I hope you do also.

Dave

 

Though my objection to cloud based services remain, they do seem to make the right noises here. Using a professional payment partner could be explained as both as a positive and a negative, but the apparent awareness of potential internal and external communication risks is a plus.

Admittedly nitpicking, that encryption could be your friend or foe. As long as they are in business it should work out, but what happens when they are in trouble and the people with the passwords go home remains to be seen. Even if you could somehow procure a court order to grab the physical servers, your data might still be inaccessible. Not very relevant for hobbyists, a potential nightmare for companies. Though I do very much realise I am looking for trouble ;)

It's basically the question that matters with all cloud services, "what happens when it ends?" I expect barely a soul thinks about that when they purchase games through Valve's Steam.

 

Essentially, anything "cloud based" read - 'on other peoples remote computers via the internet' - can never be as easy and as quick as something running locally on your own machine.

 

I pretty much agree with you. Normal design operations can hardly be faster when the data has to be shipped across the world. However, I do see some value in a server park that can spring in when simulations need to be done or other complex procedures are needed.

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

Zumfab

Here is a link to a webpage where Onshape details there security. https://www.onshape.com/security

I found it interesting, I hope you do also.

Dave

 

Though my objection to cloud based services remain, they do seem to make the right noises here. Using a professional payment partner could be explained as both as a positive and a negative, but the apparent awareness of potential internal and external communication risks is a plus.

Admittedly nitpicking, that encryption could be your friend or foe. As long as they are in business it should work out, but what happens when they are in trouble and the people with the passwords go home remains to be seen. Even if you could somehow procure a court order to grab the physical servers, your data might still be inaccessible. Not very relevant for hobbyists, a potential nightmare for companies. Though I do very much realise I am looking for trouble ;)

It's basically the question that matters with all cloud services, "what happens when it ends?" I expect barely a soul thinks about that when they sign up for the large cloud services you see today that purport to sell you something rather than rent.

 

Essentially, anything "cloud based" read - 'on other peoples remote computers via the internet' - can never be as easy and as quick as something running locally on your own machine.

 

I pretty much agree with you. Normal design operations can hardly be faster when the data has to be shipped across the world. However, I do see some value in a server park that can spring in when simulations need to be done or other complex procedures are needed.

 

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Posted · OnShape (The modern day Solidworks?)

I can say from using Onshape for a while how that I do not see a big difference in how a part model reacts in my Chrome browser to one running in CAD software on my win 8.1 computer.

I can also say that when I make a change to a part model in my browser that another person that I have shared the project with and is online in OZ can see that change in less time than I can figure. I know this because I was also talking to him on Skype and he verified the change right when I made it.

Dave

 

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