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I'm looking for information on the CPE filament by UM, Product & Safety data sheet.

thanks

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I have just noticed this new filament that popped up on the website. I'm wondering if it's a remodelled PET that came and went from the store a while ago. It comes with a PTFE insulator and says higher printing Temps.

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I got this info from Ultimaker support:

----

Printing with CPE has its pro's and con's, please see below:

Con's:

You need to print CPE on higher temperatures just like ABS. (240/250)

Printing on higher temperatures will cause the PTFE to wear out faster and that is why we included one when you purchase a spool of CPE.

CPE has just like ABS the tendency to warp, a heated camber may help reduce this.

Pro's:

CPE is just as strong as ABS.

It does not have any dangerous fumes or strange odeur.

It has nice bright colors.

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I got this info from Ultimaker support:

----

Printing with CPE has its pro's and con's, please see below:

Con's:

You need to print CPE on higher temperatures just like ABS. (240/250)

Printing on higher temperatures will cause the PTFE to wear out faster and that is why we included one when you purchase a spool of CPE.

CPE has just like ABS the tendency to warp, a heated camber may help reduce this.

Pro's:

CPE is just as strong as ABS.

It does not have any dangerous fumes or strange odeur.

It has nice bright colors.

Ok many thanks ;)

but questions remain...

- TG ?

- Strength to chemicals ?

- optimal print setting ?

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I got this info from Ultimaker support:

----

Printing with CPE has its pro's and con's, please see below:

Con's:

You need to print CPE on higher temperatures just like ABS. (240/250)

Printing on higher temperatures will cause the PTFE to wear out faster and that is why we included one when you purchase a spool of CPE.

CPE has just like ABS the tendency to warp, a heated camber may help reduce this.

Pro's:

CPE is just as strong as ABS.

It does not have any dangerous fumes or strange odeur.

It has nice bright colors.

Ok many thanks ;)

but questions remain...

- TG ?

- Strength to chemicals ?

- optimal print setting ?

Have no idea. I'm an amateur in this game, so I'm starting to think this spool won't the first I try out right now...

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I got this info from Ultimaker support:

----

Printing with CPE has its pro's and con's, please see below:

Con's:

You need to print CPE on higher temperatures just like ABS. (240/250)

Printing on higher temperatures will cause the PTFE to wear out faster and that is why we included one when you purchase a spool of CPE.

CPE has just like ABS the tendency to warp, a heated camber may help reduce this.

Pro's:

CPE is just as strong as ABS.

It does not have any dangerous fumes or strange odeur.

It has nice bright colors.

Ok many thanks ;)

but questions remain...

- TG ?

- Strength to chemicals ?

- optimal print setting ?

 

hello,

I can not to have good results with températurre between 240/250 °

the best settings on my OU are

Layer thickness: 0.04 mm

Print speed: 40mm / s

t ° nozzle: 223 °

t ° carpets: 60

flow rates: 110%

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hello,

I can not to have good results with températurre between 240/250 °

the best settings on my OU are

Layer thickness: 0.04 mm

Print speed: 40mm / s

t ° nozzle: 223 °

t ° carpets: 60

flow rates: 110%

 

Have you tried putting heat bead to 80°C and flow to 100% with higher temperatures? Can you share images with your print?

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