Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
ProfHorse

Blocked Nozzle After Every Print

Recommended Posts

Hi,

Sorry if this has come up before, a quick search didn't seem to come up with anything.

So far, the prints are going perfectly fine, but when they are done, the plastic seems to harden in the nozzle, without being retracted. When I come back later to do another print, I have to manually retract the material out, and snip the end with scissors, in order to get it to function again.

This happens every time.

I am using the default Cura settings.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this shouldn't happen. Usually after a finished print, the filament is retracted a tiny bit. Then for the next print it is extruded for that amount and some more.

What happens exactly? Does the filament remain solid in the nozzle? If so, maybe the printer thinks the job is not finished. What does the display show?

By the way, which printer are you using? I assumed it to be an Ultimaker 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this shouldn't happen. Usually after a finished print, the filament is retracted a tiny bit. Then for the next print it is extruded for that amount and some more.

What happens exactly? Does the filament remain solid in the nozzle? If so, maybe the printer thinks the job is not finished. What does the display show?

By the way, which printer are you using? I assumed it to be an Ultimaker 2.

 

It's the Ultimaker 2 Extended.

I shall try and get a picture when I next can (may be a while), but when manually retracting the filament after returning to the finished print, it has melted into a tear drop shape, tapering off to a point (hard to explain, sorry) - this leads me to believe it is setting inside the nozzle itself as it cools when finished.

The print seems to be completed - it displays no errors and displays the finished message.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondering if the PTFE coupler and nozzle are exactly in line. Get a length of filament and try and slide it into to coupler/nozzle (cold) , see if it goes in OK.

However I tend to get something like the blob on the end but it feeds OK.

IMG_20160211_154910.jpg

There is what the filament looks like immediately after retracting it out of the extruder. Normally, I would have to cut the end off and reinsert it in order to print again. Not sure what it should look like for anyone else, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll take a look when I next can (Probably be a week on Tuesday). The printer is very new, so I doubt it has been deformed or anything. Is there a chance it could have just become misaligned any other way?

Just wondering if the PTFE coupler and nozzle are exactly in line. Get a length of filament and try and slide it into to coupler/nozzle (cold) , see if it goes in OK.

However I tend to get something like the blob on the end but it feeds OK.

IMG_20160211_154910.jpg

There is what the filament looks like immediately after retracting it out of the extruder. Normally, I would have to cut the end off and reinsert it in order to print again. Not sure what it should look like for anyone else, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 0 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!