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ProfHorse

Blocked Nozzle After Every Print

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Hi,

Sorry if this has come up before, a quick search didn't seem to come up with anything.

So far, the prints are going perfectly fine, but when they are done, the plastic seems to harden in the nozzle, without being retracted. When I come back later to do another print, I have to manually retract the material out, and snip the end with scissors, in order to get it to function again.

This happens every time.

I am using the default Cura settings.

Thanks!

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Well this shouldn't happen. Usually after a finished print, the filament is retracted a tiny bit. Then for the next print it is extruded for that amount and some more.

What happens exactly? Does the filament remain solid in the nozzle? If so, maybe the printer thinks the job is not finished. What does the display show?

By the way, which printer are you using? I assumed it to be an Ultimaker 2.

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Well this shouldn't happen. Usually after a finished print, the filament is retracted a tiny bit. Then for the next print it is extruded for that amount and some more.

What happens exactly? Does the filament remain solid in the nozzle? If so, maybe the printer thinks the job is not finished. What does the display show?

By the way, which printer are you using? I assumed it to be an Ultimaker 2.

 

It's the Ultimaker 2 Extended.

I shall try and get a picture when I next can (may be a while), but when manually retracting the filament after returning to the finished print, it has melted into a tear drop shape, tapering off to a point (hard to explain, sorry) - this leads me to believe it is setting inside the nozzle itself as it cools when finished.

The print seems to be completed - it displays no errors and displays the finished message.

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Just wondering if the PTFE coupler and nozzle are exactly in line. Get a length of filament and try and slide it into to coupler/nozzle (cold) , see if it goes in OK.

However I tend to get something like the blob on the end but it feeds OK.

IMG_20160211_154910.jpg

There is what the filament looks like immediately after retracting it out of the extruder. Normally, I would have to cut the end off and reinsert it in order to print again. Not sure what it should look like for anyone else, though.

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I'll take a look when I next can (Probably be a week on Tuesday). The printer is very new, so I doubt it has been deformed or anything. Is there a chance it could have just become misaligned any other way?

Just wondering if the PTFE coupler and nozzle are exactly in line. Get a length of filament and try and slide it into to coupler/nozzle (cold) , see if it goes in OK.

However I tend to get something like the blob on the end but it feeds OK.

IMG_20160211_154910.jpg

There is what the filament looks like immediately after retracting it out of the extruder. Normally, I would have to cut the end off and reinsert it in order to print again. Not sure what it should look like for anyone else, though.

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