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Titus

Question about the slicing in Cura

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Dear Community,

Curious as always, I had a question about something I see happening in Cura from time to time.

For example, when slicing this calibration pyramid, I noticed that when it's closing the bottom surface, it leaves 'holes'(X% infill) where the legs of the pyramid will come as can be seen here:

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:8757

Hollow pyramid

It makes sense since if it were a bigger part, it would also just continue the mesh when going up, but especially for smaller parts, I believe the breaking point is quite often located here as it is a structural weakness. Would it be possible close these squares also, so that the legs are attached more firmly? This would require a general closing of the mess at some layers.

EDIT: Actually, there are 2 layers(0.2mm) completely closed before the holes start. But why not the entire top thickness?

/offtopic:

when printing this pyramid, putting the travel time at 60mm/s it estimated 26 minutes, at 200mm/s travel it was estimated at 28 minutes :O What could be happening there?

 

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What is your top/bottom thickness? You can also make your shell thickness bigger (nozzle size * number of layers you want).

About your offtopic, its a good question. Do you use cool head lift? If so it could be triggered more often when going at 200mm/s and so waste more time. (Just a theory)

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