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devilflash

Easy shell tool

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Hi everyone!

I got some 3D model I would like to print but sadly it doesn't have a thickness. I do have to add it manually for each piece.

I'm quite inexperienced in modelling but I tried with 3DS max the shell modifier tool to add the proper thickness...it works for simple geometry but I've got lots of overlapping polygons, inner shell extruding through outer shell and many other issues for more complex geometry.

Does anyone know a simple tool, or maybe a step by step tutorial to create a good thickness for 3D model in order to get them ready to print?

I've a Mark7 Iron Man Armor to print size 1:1 :D

Thanks you for any tips/tutorials/tools/videos you can provide

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Hi devilflash,

I've had to do the same for the Mark3 Iron Man suit for a friend and we did use the shell of 3ds Max.

Over time we managed to simplify the process a bit but overall here is what we did:

For every part we wanted we took the surface only (our model was nice outside but not valid for a wearable suit inside):

- We made our objects Editable Poly

- Use the selection tool with Ignore Backfacing on and By Angle (depending on the case but usually something around 20 worked well) to easily select the faces of the surface.

- Detach every surface we wanted to be considered as separate objects.

- If the object was very high in polygon we sent it in MeshLab to reduce the number of faces using Quadric Edge Collapse Decimation. Export as obj and bring it back in 3dsMax.

- In some cases we created a lid around the surface of about 3mm.

- Use the shell modifier. We used about 1.5mm (inward only) and used the Straighten Corners option. You will probably notice spikes here and there. These are the places you need to go fix.

Hope this helps

PM

Edited by Guest

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