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Schooling Blog; All you need to know about maintenance.

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Starting today [edit, a few weeks back] we're launching the Ultimaker Schooling blog series, that will focus on topics such as 3D printer maintenance, printing how-to's and other helpful tips and tricks. For this special blog series we’ll combine our local Ultimaker experts with our online knowledge base and will regularly present a collection of tips. If you follow along with these blogs you'll become a specialist in no time at all! Read on to discover our tips on the topic of maintenance.

Even though we’re a 3D printing business, we still learn something new everyday. And we should! It’s no wonder when you consider that it’s such a dynamic landscape where hardware evolves, software matures, companies grow and new applications rise all the time. No matter how much technology and expertise is put into 3D printing, it still feels like craftsmanship - with all the beauty and ingenuity that comes with it. A lot of our users have developed their own methods and workflows around 3D printing problems and have learned a great deal in the process. We’re passionate about sharing this knowledge with the world and we’re very lucky to have a thriving community who feels exactly the same. By doing so they not only help the makers of today, but also of tomorrow as our online knowledge base is always available. With such a great repository of expertise we can all become 3D printing specialists.

The first tips on our list are a few points which should keep your Ultimaker 2 in the best possible shape.

- Printhead

- Bowden tube, influences your retraction.

- Thumbscrews, avoid distortion.

- Fan bracket, optimal cooling.

- Skewed PTFE coupler, resolve under extrusion.

- Bearing print head, reduce friction.

- Atomic Method

- Remove clogs.

- Rods

- Add oil, prevent loose rods.

- Bed clips & springs

- avoid loss in surface quality.

- Print profiles

- slow print

- normal print

- fast print

If we would go all in depth here it would probably be the longest forum post ever.

Visit the original Schooling blog, with visual aid, and learn all you need to know about maintenance.

Looking forward to hear what you guys think.

Edited by Guest
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