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Artiz

Replacing UM2 Mainboard (PCB)

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I thought I would add this topic mainly because I couldn't find any tips or guidance regarding changing over the PCB on my still under warranty UM2 Ex.... and to say I was looking for HELP doesn't really cover my initial anxiety.

I think it's safe to assume it's the same PCB for all UM2's but happy to be corrected... which goes for anything else I might get wrong here...

My problems started with a Z switch error which escalated to a new mainboard replacement... supplied very quickly by Ultimaker (thanks very much). Being a newbie and not having any electrical/techy experience I was freaked out by replacing the Z switch let alone a main board switch over. DIY warranties are still a whole new concept to me.

Anyway having been 'down' to the PCB before after replacing sensor/heat cartridge... like everyone else... taking the bottom cover off hardly needs describing... nor should removing the power cable.

With the UM2 on it's side and the back left metal cable guard removed you can now remove the 4 allen screws which attach the board. Take care with the black spacers which can drop off (into oblivion) as you remove these screws.

Might be a good idea to take your own photo now and also a good idea to have a particularly observant look at where everything goes. I placed the new board just above (on the side of the machine) so that I could then simply remove from the old and replace straight into the new... easy stuff!

TIP... don't forget that the cables must be sitting behind or on the bottom of the board rather than trapped between the board and the bottom of the machine. It's therefore easier to replace the heat cartridge/sensor wires first (which can be a bit fiddly) before finally adding your stepper motor connectors.

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Lastly check all cables and connections making sure you have not damaged/broken anything.

I then put one of the screws back in nearest to the switch before carefully standing the UM2 up, connected the power and switched on... having previously 'factory reset' I went through the initial set up procedures but not sure if this was the best idea... I just didn't want to put everything back together and then find a problem meaning I'd have to take it all apart again. I then turned off, removed power and replaced the board correctly.

Finally I connected the USB and ran the latest Firmware again for good measure.

P.S. I also fitted a new Olsson block at the same time but that's more than covered elsewhere... it did however cause some separate/puzzling printing issues which have now been resolved.

Hope this helps...

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Those are great instructions for replacing the board, Artiz. We also have instructions available on fbrc8.com: https://fbrc8.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/206495413-How-to-Replace-the-Main-Electronics-Board-UM2-

You definitely always want to update the firmware on any new electronics board you receive; the standard firmware on the board is an older version of the Ultimaker 2 firmware, so if you have a 2+, or Extended, or Original+, it will be firmware for the wrong machine altogether at worst, and an outdated version of your machine's firmware at best.

In addition to the difference in the green terminal blocks on the board (as you showed with your two boards) the other thing people might see as different between an older board and a newer one is the presence of a black relay switch near the connector that controls the rear fan. The original version of the boards had the rear fan running 100% of the time. There was a switch at one point to make the rear fan only power on when the printhead is at 40 C or hotter.

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Those are great instructions for replacing the board, Artiz. We also have instructions available on fbrc8.com: https://fbrc8.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/206495413-How-to-Replace-the-Main-Electronics-Board-UM2-

You definitely always want to update the firmware on any new electronics board you receive; the standard firmware on the board is an older version of the Ultimaker 2 firmware, so if you have a 2+, or Extended, or Original+, it will be firmware for the wrong machine altogether at worst, and an outdated version of your machine's firmware at best.

In addition to the difference in the green terminal blocks on the board (as you showed with your two boards) the other thing people might see as different between an older board and a newer one is the presence of a black relay switch near the connector that controls the rear fan. The original version of the boards had the rear fan running 100% of the time. There was a switch at one point to make the rear fan only power on when the printhead is at 40 C or hotter.

 

Your instructions are far more comprehensive so that should do it... thanks for posting up!

P.S. That last bit of info is also very important from fbrc8-erin regarding the fan... I thought there may still be something wrong because the fan kept switching off/didn't come on etc... so good to know!

Edited by Guest

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Glad to help! We've got instructions up for replacing a lot of parts--there's instructions for just about all of the hot end parts, as well as the whole XY axis if you ever find yourself needing to replace the belts.

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